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Thread: Fresh dry plates in a variety of sizes

  1. #51
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
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    Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    Exactly, Corran, which is why I specified EV(100), the standard measurement and what my meter reports. My spreadsheet converts to EV(0.5) or EV(0.25), and gives the correct exposures for those values.


    Can't wait to hear the reports!
    Newly made large format dry plates available! Look:
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  2. #52
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    I am glad to see examples and explanations. ISO 2 isn't that bad...better than the Efke IR film with a filter on anyway! I might have to take a lunch break while shooting one of the plates in some of the dark woods I find myself in though .

    What kind of reciprocity issues do plates like this generally have?
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  3. #53
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    Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    Good question re: reciprocity. I've asked that question myself and on my to-do list is to figure out how to test reciprocity.

    In the meantime, from having used them, exposures up to ~45 or more are fine...of course that takes advantage of the forgiving nature of B&W. Beyond that they tend to start looking really thin and I usually swag it with 50% extra exposure time. So I want to characterize reciprocity.
    Newly made large format dry plates available! Look:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/Pictoriographica
    .. because my wife is happy when I can cover my photography expenses!

  4. #54
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    Not bad! 45s at ISO 2 is about the same as 1 second on my normal films - so that gives me some idea of whether or not reciprocity will be a problem in different situations.
    Bryan | Blog | YouTube | Instagram
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  5. #55
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    I just got the last one - really looking forward to trying this out. I have been considering attempting wet plate, and probably will at some future point, but this looks interesting.
    One quick question - I am wondering - if exposed and developed "properly" - if one might be able to achieve the "look" of ambrotype with dry plates...?
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/52893762/bigger4b.jpg

  6. #56
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    Thanks for the support, Randy. That is, literally, the last box. I have no more 4x5 boxes to pack plates in. However, I've just about finalized an order for new boxes which should ship to me in about 3 weeks. Until then, I have to figure out an alternative way to pack them.

    I must admit I panicked because that box was in a different stack in my fridge and I couldn't find it at first. But you are good to go. I just packed it up and will drop it off at the post office tomorrow.




    Another update. I used the last of the current batch of emulsion (batch 004) coating a few Whole-Plates, Quarter-Plates, and 5x7's. They are gorgeous. I think I figured out a way to pack them up at least for now just so I can get them into the hands of folks to try out, and just need to set up the listing in Etsy. The whole plates are cut to exactly 6.5 x 8.5, 5x7's the same, quarter plates are 3 1/4 x 4 1/4. I also coated some "sixth-plate" sized 2 1/2 x 3 1/2, 35mm frame size (which I'm playing with in my Nikon), and some "ninth plate" (2 x 2 1/2) size. I made the small ones because I got a new glass cutter and was playing around with it <grin>.

    In addition, I revamped my subbing layer because I wanted to improve the frilling. It's not bad now, but I'm always trying to improve and this is one of the things on my list.

    Here's what I have available in non-4x5 sizes that I'll put up on Etsy later. I'm offering in packs of 5 this time just so I can divvy them out to more folks. If they become a regular offering, I'd be interested in hearing your suggestions on how many to sell per box:

    2 packs of 5-count Whole-Plates
    1 pack of 5-count Quarter-Plates
    2 packs of 5-count 5x7

    If you're interested in the smaller stuff, just ask (I didn't count).

    Also prepared the next batch (005) of emulsion.


    -Jason

  7. #57

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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    Quote Originally Posted by Nodda Duma View Post
    ...I'd be interested in hearing your suggestions on how many to sell per box...
    This is IMHO... as you are (for the moment...) in artisan level production a value you can offer is flexibility, so offering boxes with an standard number of plates is good, but it would also be good if you can also ship any number of plates. Perhaps somebody would order 3 to learn if they like it, or somebody my want 14 because it is what fills a budged... this also would allow you to understand the box size people like, for standard boxes. Offering flexibility is a value that a big manufacturer may not be able to deliver, but in your case it is a chance to show customer care, just my view, I can be wrong...

  8. #58
    Foamer
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    I think I have a temporary solution. I (and probably most of us) have spare boxes lying about. I could mail you an empty for you to load, and then you just ship it back after I pay.


    Now on to another thought. The plates are ISO 2. Using "Sunny 16," that gives me an exposure with my f3.5 Petzvals as "f16--f11--f8--f5.6--f4" or roughly x4 stops. Now, one over the film speed equals 1/2 second exposure with f16. SO, four stops up from 1/2 = 1/2--1/4--1/8--1/15--1/30s. So in sunny daylight my exposure will work out to be ISO 2, f3.5, 1/30s, correct? Might have to add one stop (1/60s) because the ground is all snow covered here.


    Kent in SD
    The first five days after a weekend are the roughest.

  9. #59
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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    I had probably 20-30 4x5 boxes that I threw away when I moved, darn.

    Personally I think 5 to a box for the larger plates sounds fine.
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  10. #60

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    Re: Fresh 4" x 5" dry plates

    A quick comment on the "can you get similar aesthetic to wet plate?" question. My answer, based on my own plates, would be "yes and no".

    Similar:

    1) Artifacts: these come mostly from the initial pouring of the plate. Any artifacts would largely be "baked in" by Jason when he pours your plate. As he is getting better and better at this, it's likely you will see fewer and fewer pouring artifacts. Some artifacts are possible from development methods (frilling, etc., largely from temperature differentials) but to be honest I haven't seen many of these with the slightest bit of care in development. Of course you could try to get these intentionally, but as that's not my goal, I can't offer any advice for that.

    2) Color-blindness: as these aren't color-sensitized, you're getting a UV- and blue-sensitive emulsion, more or less what wet plate produces.

    Dissimilar:

    1) The "grain" on wet plate collodion is different, as the silver crystals (as I understand it) are much finer and closer to the surface of the emulsion. So the same scene, shot on both wet plate collodion and dry plate gelatin emulsion, will be subtly, or perhaps not-so-subtly different because of the physical structure of the image.

    2) The reflective characteristics of a tintype/ambrotype/what have you are different from a dry plate printed out. That having been said, there are many alternative methods of printing, including onto metal, and I'm sure you can get fairly close.

    One other thought: because of the band of spectrum the basic emulsion is sensitive to is so far up in the blue and higher end, the speed of the plates is affected considerably by the quality of the light. The plates will be noticeably faster under direct sunlight than, say, most artificial lights or even indirect sunlight. So be prepared for that if you decide an outing at -15F is looking less attractive than some time playing inside with studio lights. Don't Ask Me How I kNow This (DAMHINT).

    I encourage everybody to take advantage of Jason's cottage industry and try them out! Easy enough to do, and then you'll know. And who knows, you may get hooked enough to try making them yourself...

    Robert

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