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Thread: Cleaning of slow shutters

  1. #51

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    The best way is to strip her down. many people have been successful with the 3 bath dunk method. soaking in naptha over night. That does get most of the crud out and does work. people have reported they get another 3 or 4 years of reliable service after that (we once had many DIY sites).

    But the problem isnt really that the wash doesn't get everything.. its the relube that is the main problem after such a wash. Bottom pintels of gears arent easily accessible so they get lubed. Grease in critical areas that are buried under other parts are ignored. Even in the ultrasonic bath, that does a better job cleaning but like I pointed out, its the relube that will be lacking.

    If you arent going to strip it, send it out for a professional cleaning. If you have nothing to lose... DIY by dunking or ultrasonic.

    Whatever you chose to do, get the manual so you at least have an idea what and where to lube and with the right oils n grease. You can find tons of information on teh web if you spend the time to research it.

  2. #52

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    Feb 2015
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    Sheridan, Colorado
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    1,130

    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Graves View Post
    I'll stick with Mark and Carol Flutot's recommendation and store all my shutters on either T or B.
    And the rationale for this is?????????

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    2,500

    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Ron View Post
    The best way is to strip her down. many people have been successful with the 3 bath dunk method. soaking in naptha over night. That does get most of the crud out and does work. people have reported they get another 3 or 4 years of reliable service after that (we once had many DIY sites).

    But the problem isnt really that the wash doesn't get everything.. its the relube that is the main problem after such a wash. Bottom pintels of gears arent easily accessible so they get lubed. Grease in critical areas that are buried under other parts are ignored. Even in the ultrasonic bath, that does a better job cleaning but like I pointed out, its the relube that will be lacking.

    If you arent going to strip it, send it out for a professional cleaning. If you have nothing to lose... DIY by dunking or ultrasonic.
    I agree completely, anyway let me add the soaking cannot be done with old Compound shutters, as "The paper iris blades must be treated carefully.".

    Also I want to mention that I "repaired" a 1960s Compur by spaying inside a farly technical lube without disassembling (through the cocking lever groove), and result was perfect, six month later it continues perfect, like new I would say. I did that as an "experiment", in reality more to test the lubricant that other, and I'm really surprised. It is something I'm not encouraging to do, perhaps only as a last choice, extreme care has to be taken to not reach the blades. I used Interflon Food Lube, this is "dry lubrication film" using MicPol, this is an special kind of polarized teflon with a penetrating solvent, the solvent evaporates and a very durable teflon film is formed on surfaces.

    For what I'd recommend that lubricant is for cameras, it left my Norma working like a very well tuned violin, a pleasure, and it's H1 safe for food machinery.

  4. #54

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    Nov 2017
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    New Mexico
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    60

    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Which version of Interflon Food Lube are you using? Where did you buy it?

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    2,500

    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Rapidrob View Post
    Which version of Interflon Food Lube are you using? Where did you buy it?
    The standard version "Interflon Food Lube" : Interflon Food Lube : https://www.interflon.com/intl/en/pr...flon-food-lube

    There are high temperature versions: Food Lube HT, and the grease versions, there are a lot: https://www.interflon.com/intl/en/se...y%5D=food+lube

    The dry film version the one that simply says "Interflon Food Lube".

    I purchase it in the EU to the local branch. In the USA you should ask to https://www.interflon.com/intl/en/offices/486/usa

    Interflon USA, Inc.
    555 Route 78, Suite 403
    Swanton, Vermont
    05488 USA
    (877) 346-5823

    South East Operations
    Servicing Texas, Arkansas,
    Oklahoma and New Mexico
    Interflon America L.L.C.
    222 West Las Colinas Blvd,
    Suite 1650 - East Tower
    Irving, TX 75039
    lschalkwyk@interflon.com
    (214) 505-3203


    It is not a cheap lube for general industrial lubrication of chains etc, I use it for special applications, like for dynamic weighting machines, this is weighting at 15 products/second speed with 0.3% accuracy, there consistent low friction is requiered.

    They are specialized in technical sell, so they tend to send a tech-sales man if they can, so you may have to say that you know the product and only wanting a 0.5L spray. In 11L cans it is half the price per liter than with sprays, a 0.5L spray may cost $38 (+shipping) perhaps, just a guess, but it is used in very, very low amounts for critical jobs. I found similar products from other good brands being inferior for my critical applications, but I've not tested all brands...

  6. #56
    Mark Sawyer's Avatar
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    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Graves View Post
    I'll stick with Mark and Carol Flutot's recommendation and store all my shutters on either T or B.
    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    And the rationale for this is?????????
    Carol Flutot has been repairing LF shutters for decades, in a camera repair business opened by her father in 1945. It's the only repair shop I know that specializes in LF shutter repair, and has an excellent reputation, including among many members here, and generally a long waiting list for her services. Another shop employee taught camera repair, and a third did repairs for Kodak. All have decades of experience. So I tend towards giving Carol the benefit of the doubt on this subject.

    But that "Mark" character just pretends he knows what he's doing...
    "I love my Verito lens, but I always have to sharpen everything in Photoshop..."

  7. #57

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    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    And the rationale for this is?????????
    The rationale is that Ms Flutot may have replaced a lot of shutter springs in his professional record, and it is assumed she is not giving bad advices to repair more shutters.

    Sure she knows what models that have no problems with springs, and what models or serials can have a problem. It can happen that some serials of a model can have a bad batch of springs, and other serials won't have never a problem.

    This is something I've seen in my job, with machines having 3,000 springs and not a single failure in 10 years, and at one time something goes wrong in the thermal treatment and a machine starts braking 5 springs every day after a year of usage, and you have to relpace all springs in the machine.

    Has Ms Flutot to tell what exact serials that have springs that are prone to fail ? does she know it exactly?

  8. #58
    Jac@stafford.net's Avatar
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    Dec 2012
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    Winona, Minnesota
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    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Sawyer View Post
    But that "Mark" character just pretends he knows what he's doing...
    Mark is Tom's brother, correct? Regardless, Mark's got to be clairvoyant or experienced. Good advice for a long time, or is experience just a cheap trick?

  9. #59

    Re: Cleaning of slow shutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Wouldn’t you be wiser if you directly asked this question to a camera repair shop or lens manufacturer?

    I think it's a good idea

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