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Thread: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

  1. #21

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by Pere Casals View Post
    If you stop down to f22 (from sunny 16), the speed changes to 1/30, not 1/15, so the thing ends in 4s with ISO 50 and a Yellow

    And you can also add exposure compensation on bellows extension... Anyway if stacking 3 ND filters + Yellow better if they are of top quality, Hoya HD3 or the like, or using a ND32 or ND64, IMHO 4 stacked filters are a lot of filters.
    And, at small apertures you are into diffraction. That plus the questionable quality of many ND filters does not get you the best results.

  2. #22

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by durr3 View Post
    I am going in circles here ....... I just want to shoot with this lens until I can get the shutter to be reliable. What do you guys suggest I try? I do not have to shoot at 1 sec. I just want to get a decent exposure. I will be shooting this coming Monday and will not have time to find other film.
    It is not the end of the world....I have other lenses, but I wanted to try out this Verito.
    Send it out for service. Or replace the shutter.

  3. #23

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Talk about beating a dead horse. The guy can EASILY get to a slow shutter speed (assuming that is what he wants) using the film he has with a couple of the filters he already has -- and without having the stand on his head and spit nickels. I know that, and you know that. Now he knows it, as well.

  4. #24

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    And, at small apertures you are into diffraction. That plus the questionable quality of many ND filters does not get you the best results.
    Yes... stacking bad filters is not always a good idea, it may deliver same effect than an uncoated lens, I gess.

    There is another sound solution: using my ISO 0.5 DIY emulsion

  5. #25
    Jac@stafford.net's Avatar
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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    Talk about beating a dead horse. The guy can EASILY get to a slow shutter speed (assuming that is what he wants) using the film he has with a couple of the filters he already has -- and without having the stand on his head and spit nickels. I know that, and you know that. Now he knows it, as well.
    Stacking filters is, in my experience, a bad idea.

    And to the the subject of diffraction brought up by Bob S. at physically small apertures I call bullsh*t. For our large formats we have no worries up to F/22 for reasonable, ordinary enlargements.
    .

  6. #26

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by Jac@stafford.net View Post
    Stacking filters is, in my experience, a bad idea.

    And to the the subject of diffraction brought up by Bob S. at physically small apertures I call bullsh*t. For our large formats we have no worries up to F/22 for reasonable, ordinary enlargements.
    .
    At /22 good, modern 4x5 lenses are diffraction limited. If this is important or not... this will depend on what one wants, and if it's better or not to stop beyond /22 because DOF vs sharpness is a technical matter. Bullsh*t is manure, so not a photography term.

  7. #27

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    A still unsolved problem for me is when using heavy ND filters, that stray strong internal reflections could happen at some camera/light angles, (that were not light leaks, lens well shaded) somehow light bouncing in the optics or camera... You might see this if a bright light (like the sunset, very bright lights/reflections/beach sunshine/desert) on or slightly off lens axis... Usually a broad flare covering much of the neg...

    Stacking filters is out for heavy ND's...

    Steve K

  8. #28

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by LabRat View Post

    Stacking filters is out for heavy ND's...

    Steve K
    Funny, I've never had a problem using a 3.0ND (NOT 0.3ND) -- 10 f-stops -- in addition to a UV, plus a Polarizer, plus a Yellow or Orange, etc. I guess I'm just lucky.

  9. #29

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    Re: ND filters to slow down exposure - help

    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    Funny, I've never had a problem using a 3.0ND (NOT 0.3ND) -- 10 f-stops -- in addition to a UV, plus a Polarizer, plus a Yellow or Orange, etc. I guess I'm just lucky.
    Stacking filters has a variable effect, it depends on:

    > Fiter quality, Hoya HD3 have less troubles than inferior Hoyas.

    > Scene, sun in the framming is not the same than a subject in the shadow.

    > Focal, sun in the scene delivers more relative parasite light with a long focal than with a wide.

    > Clean filters vs not perfectly clean ones.


    A polarizer in the stack is very good if sun is in the framming. As direct sunlight comes strongly polarized the Pol will remove a big share of it, reducing parasite light to a fraction. I guess placing the pol in the outer side of the stack may be the best, as direct sunlight is reduced from the begining of the bouncing chain.

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