Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 61 to 66 of 66

Thread: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

  1. #61
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,912

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Thanks. Still quite awhile away, but I make multiple travel options in advance due to fires almost always affecting one place or another. The northern Winds are also an option - easy to find solitude there. And of course, there are still remote bucket list destinations in the Sierras. We even get those Moab ads here on SF channels. But I've done ten day hikes in some of those canyons without encountering anyone else. The cyclist mob seems to have their own particular routes.

  2. #62

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sheridan, Colorado
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    [QUOTE=Drew Wiley;1427509]The northern Winds are also an option - easy to find solitude there. [/QUOTE

    Anyplace along the Divide between Teton National Forest and the Wind River Reservation is superb. The only problem is getting in there. I've tried several times to get into the Brown Cliffs / Alpine Lakes / The Fortress Area with no luck -- over the Divide, over Hay Pass, etc. I won't pay the ludicrous Reservation access prices. Maybe in my next life!

    But my friends and I have gotten into some incredibly remote areas around there. The last time I was there -- near Green Lake -- some idiot didn't put out a campfire -- ten feet from the trail. It exploded and burned the entire sides of several mountains. The Wind Rivers are the most beautiful mountains between the Canadian Rockies and the Andes. Pretty soon there won't be any forest left in the West, so I'm glad I got out there when I could.

  3. #63
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,912

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    It's quite a drive from here, so I've never gone in through the Reservation either. Did a two-week loop two years ago in the southern section, with complete solitude half that time. Good timing for pictures too. Have done several trips in the central part, again quiet except for Elkhart Park and headed toward Titcomb Basin. Some of our canyons in the Sierra are actually a lot harder to get into than anything in the Winds, but that story of a solo hiker getting his foot trapped under a rock back around the Brown Cliffs, and slowly starving as he wrote a diary about it, is certainly poignant. I did some shortcut travel near there once, but not quite that far east.

  4. #64
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Humboldt County, CA
    Posts
    6,456

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    What I'm implying is that there were trails everywhere at least 12,000 years before you or I were ever born.
    My concept of wilderness is slowly evolving -- changing from the 60s and 70s romantic notions of wilderness being "untouched by man", towards a deeper, fuller understanding of its history. A recent good read was 1491 -- a description of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus, and all.

    When I was managing part of a US Forest Service wilderness area (attempting to manage the human impact on said wilderness to be more precise) we took a trail out of the system (stopped maintaining it and took it off the map) in order to create a large hole in the wilderness that was trail-free. I was already maintaining 150 miles of trail -- didn't mind having 6 miles less. Back then (all of the 80s), we'd spend 10 days out in the wilderness at a time, working on the trails and maybe see 4 hikers...many times no one. And that was when I finally got all the trails and signage up to our wilderness standards...tread 16 to 18" wide, trees bucked out and trail brushed out to 3' on each side, signage at all trail junctions (and only trail junctions), springs monitored, and all that stuff. Slightly toned down from the regular standards -- taking the use and conditions in the Yolla Bolly Mtns. into consideration.

    Since then, those wilderness trails have gone 25+ years without serious maintenance...and a few fires. My last few one-week backpack trips (missed last season) I have seen no one out there...and the trails are disappearing in many places. Becoming a 'wilderness' again!
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #65

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sheridan, Colorado
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    My concept of wilderness is slowly evolving -- changing from the 60s and 70s romantic notions of wilderness being "untouched by man", towards a deeper, fuller understanding of its history.
    Maybe it's the wilderness that's been evolving. It sure is different than it once was. Some wilderness areas -- such as the Maroon Bells -- require you to get a permit and then take a shuttle bus!

    I'm lucky that I have a lot of old Forest Service maps, because many of the less popular trails have been removed from the new maps, due to no maintenance, due to lack of funds. The trails can still be used, of course, if you known where they are/once were. It was recently reported that half of the Park Service budget for last year went to fire fighting. You could say their budget went up in smoke.

  6. #66
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,912

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    I grew up right on the edge of a canyon rugged enough to protect itself, provided someone doesn't dam it (which has been proposed more than once). And every year, I don't feel like I've had a real break unless I can spend at least a week with no sign of human presence around - no trails, fire rings, even stone ducks or tree blazes. I have a reasonable success rate at that, though it typically involves trail use too, to get deeper in. I don't mind ancient reminders of man being there long before. I've pretty much avoided all the "freeway" trails out here, like the Muir Trail, though I've crossed enough sections of it over the years to be familiar with most of it. Trails per se are important around here on the coast during tick season. Head off through the brush and you'll get them.

Similar Threads

  1. Large format camera and vintage lens question
    By DHodson in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 1-Nov-2016, 06:54
  2. Large Format Backpack?
    By Matthew A. Kierstead in forum Gear
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2002, 03:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •