Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 74

Thread: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sheridan, Colorado
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    That reminds me of an approach that I use to reduce weight while backpacking. Specifically, you can carry a lighter tripod than you might if, after setting up the tripod you drape the shoulder slap of your camera bag over the tripod. This not only holds the tripod down, it stabilizes the tripod. Perhaps best of all, if the top of the camera bag is left open, all of your lenses and other gear are within arms reach -- with no need to bend.

  2. #22
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,193

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Quote Originally Posted by neil poulsen View Post
    The best photo backpack I have was intended for hiking, with just cloth sides, etc. It's also the most comfortable. I cut a large, thick piece of foam to fit on the inside and then did cutouts to hold my camera and lenses. It works fine, and it's relatively light-weight.

    I've found that the protection provided with "photographic" backpacks comes at the cost off substantial weight. I also find photographic backpacks to be less comfortable. I use them for smaller outfits. But in my view, they have a downside.
    Of course, that is exactly what the now discontinued PhotoBackpacker system was all about. The bag was a Kelty Redwing variant and the protection and organization was provided by the semi-rigid boxes. There is still a need for this type of product line, but the market is apartently too small for someone to step in and replicate it. Yet I would think that the concept could be applied to DSLR/Mirrorless formats too.
    Drew Bedo
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  3. #23
    4x5 rookie
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    22

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Thats why I suggest the F Stop bags. That seems closest to that solution. Especially their largest ones.

    Roy

  4. #24
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Humboldt County, CA
    Posts
    6,510

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Quote Originally Posted by xkaes View Post
    That reminds me of an approach that I use to reduce weight while backpacking. Specifically, you can carry a lighter tripod than you might if, after setting up the tripod you drape the shoulder slap of your camera bag over the tripod...
    True, but I tend to use my tripods a little roughly and appreciate the extra strength when scrambling off-trail. Plus I am tall -- so while the old Gitzo Reporter Performance is more than I need for the 4 pounds on the tripod (4x5, lens, filmholder and darkcloth), it extends to 56" without the center column, so I don't have to bend over with the head and camera on it (my eyes are about 67" above the ground.) The center column goes up another 24" (a two-part center column), which is silly high. The pod weighs about 5 pounds (w/o head), so I think that matches the camera weight nicely. And still does a decent job with the 5x7...but I also have a Gitzo Studex, the next size up for, everyday use.

    My 8x10 equipment is not really pack-able. Size and weight of my 8x10 equipment is already at my limit for hiking...and at 62, slapping on a sleeping bag, shelter, and a hunk of bread for a several nights out is just not an option (unless with pack-animal help).
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    60

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    So when you say "I need to carry 4 lenses" you're telling us you've never been on a hike before?

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Between the mountains and the sea, somewhere in the Antipodes
    Posts
    48

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    I second Vaughn's comments regarding using a quality backpack designed for hiking rather than photography. Their harness systems are much better for carrying loads on multi-day walks. I personally use old Photobackpacker and Gnass gear cases for camera and lenses (up to 6) and carry them along with all the other necessary hiking gear in either a One Planet or Macpac 90 litre pack. Using this system I've carried a 4x5 camera on trips of up to 10 days. It is a little more challenging in the post Quickload world but still perfectly possible.

    If you want see what is possible with regard to large format wilderness photography, do some research on the work of Tasmanian photographers Peter Dombrovskis and Chris Bell and Rob Brown from New Zealand. Truly inspirational.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sheridan, Colorado
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    True, but I tend to use my tripods a little roughly and appreciate the extra strength when scrambling off-trail. Plus I am tall -- so while the old Gitzo Reporter Performance is more than I need for the 4 pounds on the tripod (4x5, lens, filmholder and darkcloth), it extends to 56" without the center column, so I don't have to bend over with the head and camera on it (my eyes are about 67" above the ground.) The center column goes up another 24" (a two-part center column), which is silly high. The pod weighs about 5 pounds (w/o head), so I think that matches the camera weight nicely. And still does a decent job with the 5x7...but I also have a Gitzo Studex, the next size up for, everyday use.

    My 8x10 equipment is not really pack-able. Size and weight of my 8x10 equipment is already at my limit for hiking...and at 62, slapping on a sleeping bag, shelter, and a hunk of bread for a several nights out is just not an option (unless with pack-animal help).
    That's sort of funny since I use the Gitzo Reporter Performance myself. Great tripod, for super high and low shots. And the reversible center column is great for close-ups VERY close to the ground. For me, the big plus is that it is not nearly as heavy as what some people insist on carrying. With a Ballhead #2 (AKA 275) I'm good to go. And with my camera bag draped around the legs, it is super stable. The only problem I've ever had is using the camera with longer lenses in high winds, the problem is with the bellows and the dark cloth staying in place. And like you, most of my hikes are off-trail -- to get away from the crowds, among other things. I normally carry about a dozen super thin, lightweight Mido film holders and around eight to 10 lenses -- my four Minolta macro/micro lenses are all very small and lightweight, but I usually only bring two of them at a time.

  8. #28
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Humboldt County, CA
    Posts
    6,510

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Used a Gitzo #2 Ballhead with a set of Studex legs for years until that pod and camera (5x7) gear got ripped off from my truck in '95. Finally back to a ballhead for the 4x5 and Rollei.

    I usually carry 5 to 6 film holders (and one lens) -- and if it is a two or three night trip, that might be all the film I take. Make 'em count!
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    41

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    Hi everybody. I'm think if I can purchase a camera insert bag which is much more lighter than camera backpack (about 500g). And purchasing a professional hiking backpack. Put all necessary hiking equipment + camera equipment in the insert bag. It provides good protection to my camera equipment, and good for hiking.

  10. #30
    Angus Parker angusparker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, USA
    Posts
    730

    Re: Large Format 4x5 Camera Hiking Backpack Question

    F64 pack is great for LF and if you use it for 4x5 you just might have enough to room for clothes, food and a sleeping bag strapped somewhere outside but I agree that a dedicated hiking pack would be better. Amazon sells a ton of small cases with foam which would probably be a good bet for the camera and another one for two lenses and the meter.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. Large format camera and vintage lens question
    By DHodson in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 1-Nov-2016, 06:54
  2. Large Format Backpack?
    By Matthew A. Kierstead in forum Gear
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2002, 03:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •