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Thread: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

  1. #1

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    1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    I just came across an eBay listing for one of these monsters. The seller says that only eight (8) were ever made.

    Can anyone confirm this?

    Thanks,

    Dan

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    I just came across an eBay listing for one of these monsters. The seller says that only eight (8) were ever made.

    Can anyone confirm this?

    Thanks,

    Dan
    I don't know, here it says 10 units http://www.diyphotography.net/milita...format-camera/

    probably you also saw that...

    Nice dialyte !!!

    It would be interesting to know the differences with the 1800 tessar

    It can be interesting to see if it will be sold. It's not owning it: it's using it !!


    This Pleogon, aerial Biogon (Not the same kind of lens, also huge, 30kg)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Has been offered for more than one year, at some point offered for the half.


    (Sorry Oren for the ebay link)
    Last edited by Pere Casals; 25-Mar-2017 at 02:03. Reason: Please review the sticky on eBay links in our News subforum

  3. #3

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Thanks for the reply and links. If I saw the diy link I forgot it quickly.

    The 1800/14 tessar type Apo-Nikkor is heavier (cataloged weight 8,860 g vs. the dialyte's 6,430) and its angle covered is 40' narrower. Coverages at infinity are 1137 mm (dialyte) and 1135 mm (tessar).

    The coverage claimed in the ebay listing is at 1:1. With respect to general photography, pure fantasy. The coverage in the diy piece is realistic but the illustrations aren't. If the guy is coating plates, he's going to be shooting black/white, not color.

    About posting links to ebay listings here without breaking the rules. First save the link to the listing on www.archive.org, then post a link to the link on archive.org.

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    Thanks for the reply and links. If I saw the diy link I forgot it quickly.

    About posting links to ebay listings here without breaking the rules. First save the link to the listing on www.archive.org, then post a link to the link on archive.org.
    Thanks for the tip...



    So I guess you also arrived to project site http://www.lightcatcher.it/en/#Gallery

    You may contact Kurt Moser http://www.lightcatcher.it/en/#Contatti he should know about that, a 1780 owner should, I guess.


    Not a joke of camera !!!

    One great think about the 1780 (or the 1800) is that one does not transport the camera in a backpack, one rides the 6x6 AWD camera, yeah !

  5. #5

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Let's not leave out the Fujinon A 1200. It was designed as an APO macro lens. It weighted in at an impressive FIVE pounds and needed FOUR AND A HALF FEET of bellows to focus at infinity! If you wanted a 1:1 magnification, you'll need NINE FEET of bellows. But it was really too long for most photographers, so it was not produced for very long. This was a special order lens so it is nearly impossible to find -- let alone to afford. The Fuji literature lists the minimum aperture as f90, but the picture in their literature shows f128. Apparently less than a dozen were made.

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Joe, the A 1200 may have been an apochromat but it was intended for general photography, not, as packaged and sold, for graphic arts applications. Apo-Nikkors and similar lenses from other makers were made for graphic arts applications. When those uses went away many process lenses were scrapped but some escaped are were repurposed by photographers.

    I've chased process lenses for years. They can be very good and, if they can be shuttered, relatively inexpensive alternatives to lenses sold for general photography. I've never come across Fuji process lenses. Did Fuji make lenses specifically for that market?

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

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    Sometimes love just ain't enough.
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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    Joe, the A 1200 may have been an apochromat but it was intended for general photography, not, as packaged and sold, for graphic arts applications. Apo-Nikkors and similar lenses from other makers were made for graphic arts applications. When those uses went away many process lenses were scrapped but some escaped are were repurposed by photographers.

    I've chased process lenses for years. They can be very good and, if they can be shuttered, relatively inexpensive alternatives to lenses sold for general photography. I've never come across Fuji process lenses. Did Fuji make lenses specifically for that market?
    Well, Fuji made six A series lenses from 180mm to 1200mm, all relatively slow. I use a 180mm f9 that is optimized for 1:1 - 1:5 so I use it mostly for macro use, but it is fine for regular work, too. So I call it a macro and Fuji doesn't call it a "process" lens or a "graphic arts lens". They just call it an APO lens optimized for 1:1 - 1:5. So I call it a macro, but I will defer to your expertise in this area. Here's what I know:

    http://www.subclub.org/fujinon/byseries.htm

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    A few years ago I bought a few boxes of Nikkor APOs. Now, I did not get a 1780mm, but I did get the one of the beautifully Nikon - made wooden boxes that was made for the lens. Inside it has a full set of waterhouse stops for the lens, plus a front lens cap, and most interesting for the purposes of this thread, an inspection certificate. It lists the serial number of that lens as 178012. I'd assume that means at least 12 were made, since Nikon usually starts serial numbers at 1.

    A bit off topic, but what's an Nikon Auto-Edger 30? It was also in the box also.

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    Re: 1780/14 Apo-Nikkor production volumes

    Joe, thanks for the reply and link. I'm well aware of your site, find it very useful. Fuji's Series A lenses can be thought of as process lenses in shutter. I'm still not aware of any lenses that Fuji marketed to the graphic arts market

    After WW II many other makers including, in alphabetical order, Agfa, Berthiot, Boyer, Goerz, Konica, Kowa, Nikon, Rodenstock, Schneider, Taylor Hobson, Voigtlaender and Wray made lenses for that market. Why Fuji didn't is a puzzle. They certainly had the ability.

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