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Thread: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

  1. #51

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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I've packed a lot of dead weight out of some nasty country by lots of means. Mostly in packs but with some game carts. The ones withe wheels side by side are ok if your on an old closed logging road, but leave a lot to be desired on trails. If I ever buy another cart it will be an inline model like the Neet Kart, It handle rocks, deadfall and narrow trails with ease.

    But at this point in life I actually prefer to use a BVA Pac Bag. The last two elk we packed out were in these bags, 7000 cubic inches! with the weight distribute between front and back 100 pound loads are easily done. Don't get me wrong it's still a lot of work, but its so much better than a backpack. After using these bags once, I immediately traded in my $500.00 Eberlystock rig for these bags. I haven't used them in summer so they may get a little warm, but I would not hesitate to load one up with 50 to 60 pounds and got 10 to 15 miles a day. I will NEVER pack out another elk in a backpack.

    The llamas are a great option if you have a place for them and a trailer. I prefer pack goats, they are smaller and easier to deal with, they will even ride in the back seat of a car. They can carry ~50 pounds each for 13 to 15 miles a day on forest service trails. If I decide to go off trail I usually go 30 to 40 pounds depending on terrain and distances. they can go anyplace I can. On one boulder field we had to cross the goats did great, but I had to go back and carry the dog across!
    You can't teach an old dog new tech's!

  2. #52
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I had the crew in the wilderness, packing mules and maintaining the trails. A couple of the women on the crew were not tall...5'4" give or take and inch. Packing the mules was not easy for them! Heck, I was the only one tall enough to pack Joe, our lead mule. Out in the Wilds, we came across a veteran with back issues whose burro had taken off on him. We found his burro for him and those gals wanted me to get a couple so badly. But you can't drape a misery whip over a burro without the handles dragging on the ground! And hauling 320 pounds of garbage out of an old hunters camp would have taken a few more trips!
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  3. #53
    tgtaylor's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I thinking about replacing my 1998 Schwinn Le Tour - which was stolen from an outside storage locker - with a flat handlebar Salsa Marrakesh: http://www.cyclingabout.com/2017-sal...-touring-bike/ Past long distance tours always resulted in some nerve damage to my hands which prevented me from buttoning my shirt colors for 30 or so days. I imagine that this resulted from leaning forward on the handlebars for too long. A flat handlebar would prevent that from happening and personally I prefer riding upright than bending forward. All the gear can be carried in the Burley Nomad trailer and a front handlebar bag can carry incidentals like wallet, glasses, bug spray, 35mm camera. I thinking about taking the F6 for shooting transparencies along the route and either a Pentax 645NII and/or Toyo 45CF for more serious B&W photography. The lightweight and compact series 0 Gitzo will work for all three.

    Thomas

  4. #54
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I just do not like riding without my gel gloves -- otherwise my hands are toast. While there are not the number of possible hand positions available on the more mountain-bike style handlebar, I appreciate the control one has on a loaded bike on rough/gravel roads with ones hands towards the ends of the bars. I also have extra padding on center section of the handlebars -- not much, bit it helps.

    Touring taught me a lot about proper seating and body positions! Since I was on the bike for 5 months, I had lots of time to learn -- and a bunch of pain that was the teacher! I thought locking my elbows was an easy way to ride and support my upper body. A few weeks later, I decided that, no, it was a terrible way to ride -- easy decision with my elbows yelling at me, on and off the bike. Hobbling around for a couple weeks halfway thru my adventure and unable to ride, taught me that using too much torque (too high of a gear) for a thousand miles with 60 to 80lbs of gear on the bike was not good my knees. Slow learner.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  5. #55
    tgtaylor's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I'll probably swap-out the stock handlebar for a trekking bar which allows for 4 different hand positions; 50lbs of gear would be max for me. You can buy food, fuel, wash clothes and get whatever else you need as you go - no need to stock it on the bike.

    Thomas

  6. #56

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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    I put upswept cruiser handle bars on my 1/2 road 1-2 mountain bike and I like it a lot better. I'd also like to mention recumbents can be away around nerve damage at several points of the anatomy.

  7. #57

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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    A pro LF photograher that I knew said that he always arrived the day before a shoot to scope out shots and lighting.

    Anything otherwise is high risk... of getting little or nothing.

  8. #58
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    Quote Originally Posted by tgtaylor View Post
    I'll probably swap-out the stock handlebar for a trekking bar which allows for 4 different hand positions; 50lbs of gear would be max for me. You can buy food, fuel, wash clothes and get whatever else you need as you go - no need to stock it on the bike. Thomas
    True...until you find yourself 70 miles from nowhere with a small bowl of granola for breakfast and a handful of nuts and raisins for the rest of the day. Actually poor planning and poor luck on my part -- I should have known that last store was going to be it for awhile -- plus I did not factor in that it was Christmas and any possible little shop along the way would be closed. I had just come out of the bush after a week of backpacking and had gone thru my food.

    I did go over-board with the gear. Full Backpacking gear, tent, the 4x5, and did I mention I had my prescription diving mask and snorkel with me, too? After breaking a spoke, I decided to put any extra gear in the backpack and I shipped it by bus to the place I would need it next (about 16 pounds). For the above hike, I bought all the food for the hike in town, put it in the pack and had the bus drop it off the 45 miles up the road in the National Park. Made the ride up that gravel road enjoyable.

    But yeah -- a credit card and a few changes of clothes and one can tour very light. Camping gear adds weight, but flexibility.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  9. #59
    tgtaylor's Avatar
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    Re: Practicality of using LF and especially ULF in the field

    If I do this trip there's one or two sections where there is a considerable distance between resupply points - like a days ride. I'll probable carry a couple of freeze dried backpacker meals with me for those and any like emergency that may arise. The main problem though is water and that's where the trailer comes in: I can carry 1 or 2 gallons of extra water in the trailer to pull me through those points. My total gear weight will be 50lbs max and that includes the 15lbs weight of the trailer.

    But the real problem is developing film along the route. This trip will take about 3 months give or take and for me that's too long to go before developing.

    Thomas

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