Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Framing question

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brewster, NY
    Posts
    206

    Framing question

    I'm preparing to mount a show for December and I could use a small bit of framing advice.

    I have two 20x30 prints that I'm going to flush mount to the edges of metal frames. No mat. I'll be using spacers to keep the print off the plexiglas. Generally, when I mount prints for framing, I use a piece of either foam core or gator board as backing material.

    The question is this: Given the size of the print, is it advisable to have the print physically bonded to the gator board or can I rely on the pressure of the backing spring clips to hold the print properly in place? There's a significant cost difference: To have my custom lab mount it to the board will cost $40 per print. Simply using foam core backing without bonding will cost $4.50 per print.

    Opinions?

    Many thanks!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    grand rapids
    Posts
    3,835

    Re: Framing question

    In my experience, foam core doesn't stay flat over time. I wouldn't rely on clips holding a print that size (or any size for me).
    My lab charges $24 to mount a 20x30 on gator board (3/16) including materials.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brewster, NY
    Posts
    206

    Re: Framing question

    Quote Originally Posted by vinny View Post
    In my experience, foam core doesn't stay flat over time. I wouldn't rely on clips holding a print that size (or any size for me).
    My lab charges $24 to mount a 20x30 on gator board (3/16) including materials.
    Sigh...I was hoping for a different answer ;-).

    Thanks for the sound advice, Vinny.

  4. #4
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    420

    Re: Framing question

    If you are looking to spend that kind of money, look into dibond as a backing board. It doesn't warp

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Northwest of Chicago
    Posts
    1,271

    Re: Framing question

    +1 for Dibond

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    McHenry IL
    Posts
    63

    Re: Framing question

    Dibond is heavy and more expensive than gatorfoam. If you are asking if an umounted print can be supported just by a backer the short answer is no. You can mount it directly to gator or mat board backed with gator. At that size you're at about the limit for 3/16" gator to remain flat is a frame. Any bigger and I'd recommend 1/2" gator. Another consideration is mounting the print "second surface" directly to the acrylic. This eliminates the need for spacers, backer board etc. If you want archival, then mount the print to rag/museum board and back it with archival foam board for additional support. A side note, you can also use matte acryilic but put the matte non glare side facing the print. The matte surface will not stick to your print if that is what you are concerned with. Then you can forgo spacers and mounting all together.

  7. #7
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,557

    Re: Framing question

    Dibond is awfully expensive for just a backer material. But a $40 mounting charge ain't bad at all if it's competently done. You don't say what you're print is.
    If it's true high-gloss polyester material, then you need specialized mounting. For paper prints, any "orangepeel" is unlikely to show. Gator is generally fine either
    way. One precaution per the preceding post, and putting the print directly into contact with acrylic: don't do it in a high-humidity environment, or for a display on
    a poorly insulated perimeter wall, because you won't have a airspace between your print and the glazing. You risk condensation and mildew. Acrylic also bows outward slightly toward heat and light.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    on the banks of the Potomac
    Posts
    2,243

    Re: Framing question

    Gatorfoam board is non-archival... don't expect anything you mount on it to last. In a past life I used large amounts of it, but didn't expect the final pieces to last.

  9. #9
    bob carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario,
    Posts
    3,948

    Re: Framing question

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Sampson View Post
    Gatorfoam board is non-archival... don't expect anything you mount on it to last. In a past life I used large amounts of it, but didn't expect the final pieces to last.
    I was about to say that I am not aware of any frame shop worth its salt using gatorboard. It is really nasty stuff.

  10. #10
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,557

    Re: Framing question

    Gator is highly used in this area with an excellent track record. It's inert because all the "nasties" are bound in the resin so don't interact with the print medium at
    all. There are tech sheets which spell all this out. As far bonding with hi-tack acrylic foil goes, you simply sand the Gator a bit. Dustless sanding is a piece of cake.
    Of course, good cake cost more than a greasy doughnut. But if you have worries about Gator and want an extremely smooth all-plastic archival mounting substrate at significantly less cost than Dibond, I'd recommend UltraBoard.

Similar Threads

  1. Framing
    By spacegoose in forum Business
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 26-Feb-2013, 22:21
  2. A question about framing photos
    By Stephen Willard in forum Business
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2008, 20:46
  3. Contemporary framing question
    By Kurney Ramsey in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Aug-2007, 20:38
  4. Framing big in the UK
    By Ben R in forum Business
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 4-May-2007, 02:39
  5. Backing boards for framing question
    By scott jones in forum Business
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2001, 23:32

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •