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Thread: exposure with filter and spotmeter

  1. #11
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,557

    Re: exposure with filter and spotmeter

    Even with Nikons I prefer to hand meter and apply a filter factor. I find it's far more reliable, but do realize there are a helluva lot of models of Nikon out there,
    and I certainly don't have any experience with all of em.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    1,135

    Re: exposure with filter and spotmeter

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    Even with Nikons I prefer to hand meter and apply a filter factor. I find it's far more reliable, but do realize there are a helluva lot of models of Nikon out there,
    and I certainly don't have any experience with all of em.
    Drew, there are only 2 Nikon models there: the F5 and the others

    I collect Nikons, all are nice machines, single problem of the F5 is weight. I use it as a TTL spot photometer for the view camera, placing it in the back, so it includes bellows extension, then also I make a bracketing with same film than the sheet, after developing the roll I know how I've to develop the sheets, and what exposure was the best, useful to me to learn new films...

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, AUS
    Posts
    46

    Re: exposure with filter and spotmeter

    How about spot metering a grey card (and white and black cards too if you wish) through the respective filter?
    As long as the grey cards orientation is the same angle as the subject and in the same light, i think that would be ok.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Collinsville, CT USA
    Posts
    616

    Re: exposure with filter and spotmeter

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    The Zone VI modified meters are supposed to be accurate when you take a reading through the filters. The regular non-modified meters are not calibrated for that use.
    While back I had 2 Soligor Spot Sensor meters, one stock the other Zone VI modified. Both read within a 1/4 f stop of each other. Both read within a 1/4 f stop of each other reading through the same filter, even with a Wratten 25 (red tricolor) and a Wratten 12 (deep yellow - minus blue). FYI neither agreed with my SEI which should have been the standard to match, but in the end all were so close that I got perfectly acceptable negatives using any of the 3 meters readings.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    1,135

    Re: exposure with filter and spotmeter

    Quote Originally Posted by alen View Post
    How about spot metering a grey card (and white and black cards too if you wish) through the respective filter?
    As long as the grey cards orientation is the same angle as the subject and in the same light, i think that would be ok.
    It is a partial solution, I think. It can be good if subject it is not very "saturated" in color and it has a wide spectral band as the grey card has.


    This do not solves the case that the spotmeter has not a flat spectral sensitivity curve and that a color filter will darken some colors more than others. For example if we have an sky that will be everexposed and we want to know the effect of the filter, to know if the sky will drop 2 zones or 1 zone relative to the earth with a yellow filter. Some scenes have a high dynamic range that it is difficult to capture.

    if we look the spectral sensitivity chart of the Pentax 5 (http://www.pacificrimcamera.com/rl/00042/00042.pdf) we see that sensitivity for blue is 50% of what it can be expected. So sky will be more overexposed than hat Pentax V says by pointing up, and this effect will be increased with a yellow filter on.


    So it is not easy, and we can go to the problem by two ways. One is with real field experience, knowing is a Zone 7 sky is nice. The other way is by using charts to figure what will happen.

    I think best option is combining both ways: knowing the theory of what happens, and looking what happens in practice.

    Anyway I think that Doremus Scudder is right in what he says in post #9.

    A Spotmeter it is very usefull know what contrast we'll have in a photograph, and it is also useful to know how contrast will change with placing the filter on the spotmeter, but corrections are needed.

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