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Thread: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

  1. #1

    Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Hi,
    I'd like to pick up some Lee grads, warming, and B&W filters. Is there a good primer on the differences between the types somewhere? I'm guessing for large format the Lee 100mm series is what I want. But I don't know why one might use a hard or soft grad... Also it seems like the thing to get is the Lee compendium hood. Looks like it has pretty much universal lens compatibility and it's otherwise hard to get a hood on a Chamonix. Any good sources or input would be welcome here. I've basically become convinced that you really can't shoot chromes w/o grads. Maintaining that 4 stop range is a challenge haha.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2

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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Be aware that if you get a universal hood it has two filter slots built into the hood itself and the hood fits directly onto the lens adapter ring of whichever size you have bought for your lens. I mention this because it means you don't need one of the 100mm system holders unless you want to use more than two filters at the same time. This may not be so obvious from the lee website. So you only only need adapter ring and universal hood and filters/grads. The filter sizes should be the ones which fit the hood slots which I think are the 100mm ones.
    Also if you have very wide angle lenses then there is a danger of vignetting if you are using the system holder so save yourself some money and don't buy a system holder unless you really need it.

    As to which grad, it depends on the lighting contrast of your subject. The greater the contrast between the sky and the land, the stronger the grad you need. I suspect you'll need a couple. Watch the video demonstrations on their website which give you guidance.

  3. #3

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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    the page you want for B&W filters is this one I think.

    http://www.leefilters.com/index.php/...ellow-standard

    watch the videos on the right hand side which include Some Grads

  4. #4
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Should work fine for wide-angle lenses if you use an oversized step-up ring first, unless you're talking about some really short XXL style lens, or those requiring
    exceptionally big filters to begin with. I don't use the Lee filter system at all; but the hoods themselves are nice as malleable bellows-style shades.

  5. #5

    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Thanks everyone! Looks like I'll get the hood. Can't wait to see some Velvia done right with these guys. :-)

  6. #6

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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    I concur, if you want to shoot landscapes with chromes, you need grads.

    My experience with the hard vs. soft option, for 4x5 and 8x10, is that "hard" is not that hard in large format. Hard is probably all you really need, but I'd suggest starting with hard and see if you feel you need a soft version.

    I use the Lee wide angle hood, with the wide-angle adapter rings, and I have been quite satisfied with the system.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Unwitting Thread Killer Ari's Avatar
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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Quote Originally Posted by biedron View Post
    My experience with the hard vs. soft option, for 4x5 and 8x10, is that "hard" is not that hard in large format. Bob
    Bob, can you explain, or elaborate this please?
    Thank you

  8. #8

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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Ari,

    I find the demarcation line not well defined when using the hard grads on large format. I don't have to worry about precise placement of the filter because the transition across the grad/no grad boundary is very subtle.

    Bob

  9. #9
    Unwitting Thread Killer Ari's Avatar
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    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    Thanks, Bob. I'm surprised and pleased to hear that.

  10. #10

    Re: Intro to Lee (or others) cut filtration?

    So what If I'm looking at a scene with a mixed horizon? One tall tree or a diagonal horizon? Still the hard grad or is that the situation where you might want a soft? I'm looking at getting one of the Lee 3 filter kits, but I'd like some money left over for an 81A or possibly an orange for B&W. Costs are adding up though...

    Does anyone use the big stopper for 4x5? With Provia and Velvia being so slow and small apertures being available I'm not sure I need it...

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