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Thread: Old Formulas: Paper

  1. #1

    Old Formulas: Paper

    <a name=index></a>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%"><tr><td align="center"><h3>These formulas are given for 'Historical reference ONLY'. Some of the formulas contain chemicals that are noxious, toxic,
    or just plain dangerous to handle. KNOW what you are doing first or learn about chemical handling BEFORE you start using these.</h3></td></tr></table>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%"><th colspan=2>Paper Developers</th>
    <tr><td colspan=2>Agfa Paper Developers</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Agfa 103</td><td align="center">Agfa 106</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Agfa 110</td><td align="center">Agfa 120</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Agfa 125</td><td align="center">Agfa 135</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Agfa 113</td><td align="center">Agfa 115</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Agfa 130</td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td colspan=2>Kodak Paper Developers</td>
    <tr><td align="center">D-32</td><td align="center">D-52</td>
    <tr><td align="center">D-72</td><td align="center">D-73</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Comparison</td><td align="center">D-93</td>
    <tr><td align="center">D-155</td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td colspan=2>Misc. Paper Developers</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Standard Paper Developer</td><td align="center">Wellington Amidol</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Amidol Developer</td><td align="center">Bostrom's Blue Tone</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Burki and Jenny Red Tone</td><td align="center">Howell's Brown-Black Re-Development</td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    </table>



    <h2><a name=a103>Agfa Paper Developers</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center">Agfa 103</td><td align="center">Agfa 106</td><td align="center">Agfa 110</td><td align="center">Agfa 120</td><td align="center">Agfa 125</td><td align="center">Agfa 135</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125 F)</td><td align="center">750ml</td><td align="center">750ml</td><td align="center">750ml</td><td align="center">750ml</td><td align="center">750ml</td><td align="center">750ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Metol</td><td align="center">3.5g</td><td align="center">0.7g</td><td align="center"></td><td align="center">12.3g</td><td align="center">3.0g</td><td align="center">1.6g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">45.0g</td><td align="center">11.5g</td><td align="center">57.0g</td><td align="center">36.0g</td><td align="center">44.0g</td><td align="center">24.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">11.5g</td><td align="center">3.5</td><td align="center">22.5g</td><td align="center"></td><td align="center">12.0g</td><td align="center">6.6g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate(mono)</td><td align="center">78.0g</td><td align="center">10.0g</td><td align="center">75.0g</td><td align="center">36.0g</td><td align="center">65.0g</td><td align="center">24.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">1.2g</td><td align="center">2.4g</td><td align="center">2.75g</td><td align="center">1.8g</td><td align="center">2.0g</td><td align="center">2.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>

    </table>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">103 : Recommended for cold, blue-black tones. Dilute 1 to 2 with water.
    <tr><td align="center">106 : Recommended for producing warm olive-black tones with chloride papers. Use undiluted.
    <tr><td align="center">110 : Recommended for warm tones. Dilute 1 to 5 with water.
    <tr><td align="center">120 : Soft working developer, use for split development. Dilute 1 to 2 with water.
    <tr><td align="center">125 : Neutral tones, use with 120 for split development. Dilute 1 to 2 with water.
    <tr><td align="center">135 : Rich, warm-black tones, use with 120 for split development. Dilute 1 to 1 with water.
    </table>

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=a113>Agfa Amidol Developer 113</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Amidol</td><td align="center">6.6g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">44.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">.55g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "This formula is intended for tray development only and must be mixed fresh each time. It is recommended only for small lots of prints. Do not dilute for use."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=a115>Agfa Glycin Developer 115</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">750ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">90.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate(mono)</td><td align="center">150.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Glycin</td><td align="center">30.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">9.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">4.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "For warm tones, dilute 1 part stock solution with 3 parts water and develop prints 2.5 to 3 minutes at 68F. For very warm tones and more open shadows, especially with Cykora, dilute 1 part stock solution with 6 parts water, giving prints 3 to 4 times normal exposure and 2.5 to 5 minutes development."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=a130>Agfa Universal Developer 130</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">750ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Metol</td><td align="center">2.2g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">50.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">11.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate(mono)</td><td align="center">78.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">5.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Glycin</td><td align="center">11.0</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "The prepared stock solution is clear but slightly colored. The color in this case does not indicate the developer has deteriorated or is unfit for use. For use, dilute 1 part stock solution with 1 part water."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=d32>Warm Tone Lantern Slides Kodak D-32</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Stock Solution A</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite(des)</td><td align="center">6.3g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">7.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">3.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Citric Acid</td><td align="center">0.7g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center"></td>
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Stock Solution B</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate(des)</td><td align="center">30.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Hydroxide</td><td align="center">4.2g</td>
    </table>

    Dissolve in order given.

    To use: 1 part A - 1 part B : 2 min.@68F
    For still warmer tone use 1 part A - 2 parts B
    ((This might work as a warm-tone paper developer, dilute 1-2 to start))



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=d52>Warm Tone Paper Kodak D-52</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center">D-52</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Elon (metol)</td><td align="center">1.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">22.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">6.3g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">15.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">1.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Dissolve in order given.
    To use: mix 1 part solution - 1 part water - 2 min.@68F

    "More bromide may be added for warmer tones."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=>Universal Paper Developer Kodak D-72</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center">D-72</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Elon (metol)</td><td align="center">3.1g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">45.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">12.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">67.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">1.9g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Suggested : see materials for time / temp / dilution
    ((try 1 part stock to 3 parts water - 2 min.@68F to start))



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=d73>Kodak D-73</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Elon (metol)</td><td align="center">2.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">40.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">10.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">75.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">0.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Developer for Blue-Black tones for Azo and Ad-Type papers.
    Suggested : dilute 1 part stock to 2 parts water.
    45 seconds @70F.

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=comp>Comparison</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center"></td><td align="center">D-52 (warm)</td><td align="center">D-72 (neutral)</td><td align="center">D-73 (cold)</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td><td align="center">500ml</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Elon (metol)</td><td align="center">1.5g</td><td align="center">3.1g</td><td align="center">2.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">22.5g</td><td align="center">45.0g</td><td align="center">40.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">6.3g</td><td align="center">12.0g</td><td align="center">10.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate **</td><td align="center">15.0g</td><td align="center">67.5g</td><td align="center">75.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide **</td><td align="center">1.5g</td><td align="center">1.9g</td><td align="center">0.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    ((Could not help the comparison. The ratio between carbonate and bromide makes it warm, neutral, or cold tone.))



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=d93>Kodak 'Kodelon' developer DK - 93</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F.)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Kodelon (metol??)</td><td align="center">2.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">30.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">2.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Kodalk</td><td align="center">20.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">0.5g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Dissolve in order given.
    Suggested:
    film: 9 min.@68F
    plates: 6 min.@68F
    paper: 2 min.@68F

    For colder tones, double the amount of Kodalk. In either case the tones will be warmer than from D-52 or D-72

    "The use of D-93 is especially recommended for persons subject to skin irritation."



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=d155>Kodak D-155</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F.)</td><td align="center">750ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Metol</td><td align="center">0.4g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">4.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Glycin</td><td align="center">2.6g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">22.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">18.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">4.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Suggested = dilute 1 - 2 for general use; more for warmer tones.



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=std>Standard Paper Developer</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Water (125F)</td><td align="center">500ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Metol</td><td align="center">5.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite(anhydrous)</td><td align="center">75.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">20.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate(anhydrous)</td><td align="center">105.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">5.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Methyl Alcohol</td><td align="center">105.0ml</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Cold water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    Suggested : use at 65 to 70F.
    for bromide paper - dilute 1 part stock to 6 parts water
    for chloro-bromide paper - dilute 1 part stock to 4,5, or 6 parts water
    for chloride paper - dilute 1 part stock to 3 parts water
    "After solution is completely dissolved, filter and store in amber colored, tightly stopped bottles."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=wel>Wellington Amidol</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">23.3g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Amidol</td><td align="center">3.3g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium bromide</td><td align="center">0.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">700ml</td>
    </table>

    Suggested : full strength for 2 - 3 min.@70F.
    "This developer does not keep well, hence should be made up fresh just before use and discarded after the batch of prints has been made."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=amd>Amidol Developer</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">35.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Metabisulphite</td><td align="center">13.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Amidol</td><td align="center">6.6g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "Add bromide as needed. Dilute the developer for softer effects."
    "Since Amidol does not keep well, it may perhaps be better to add the amidol at the time of development as it quickly dissolves. Potassium metabisulphite may be omitted in that case. Citric acid may be used as a preservative instead of the potassium metabisulphite."



    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=blue>Bostrom's Blue Tone Developer</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td align="center">Metol</td><td align="center">3.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">40.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Hydroquinone</td><td align="center">12.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">75.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">0.8g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "Bostrom described a formula for obtaining blue tones by direct developmentabove).
    To every 100cc of the above add 2 to 5 cc of 1% nitrobenzimidazole before using."

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=red>Burki and Jenny's Red Tone Developer</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Solution A</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Catechol</td><td align="center">20.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Sulfite</td><td align="center">200.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Carbonate</td><td align="center">100.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">2.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Solution B</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Ammonium Sulfate</td><td align="center">20.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "Burki and Jenny reported that tones varying from brown to red-chalk may be obtained with chlorobromide papers by direct development in a catechol developer in connection with ammonium sulfate. The solutions are as followsabove)
    For red-brown tones take equal parts of A and B. For colder brown tones decrease B and for redder tones increase B. Expose so that the desired density is obtained in 2.5 min. @18C.

    <hr>index<hr>
    <h2><a name=brown>Howell's Brown/Black Re-Development</a></h2>
    <table align="center" border="1" width="80%">
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Bleach</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Ferricyanide</td><td align="center">8.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Potassium Bromide</td><td align="center">12.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    <tr><td colspan=2 bgcolor=silver>Redeveloper</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Catechol</td><td align="center">2.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Sodium Carbonate</td><td align="center">10.0g</td>
    <tr><td align="center">Water to make</td><td align="center">1.0L</td>
    </table>

    "Howell has reported a procedure for obtaining pleasing brown-black tones from almost all types of papers by bleaching the black-and-white print and redeveloping in a sulfite-free catechol formula. The method has the advantage that the beautiful tones of catechol development may be achieved without its disadvantages. One may use his favorite reliable MQ formula such as D-72, D-52, ect., to obtain a normal black-and-white print. After fixing and washing thoroughly, bleach the print in a ferricyanide formula just as for sulfide toning.

    Immerse print in this bleach until the deepest blacks have gone to a faint brown. Wash 5 min. in running water and redevelop.

    This bath does not keep well and must be used immediately after making up. It will not safely develop more than two 14X17 prints. The bleaching bath may be used until exhausted. During redevelopment the print passes through various unpleasant shades of reds and browns, and development is complete when the tone has changed to a brown-black with no further change. Wash for 1 hour and dry as usual. A slight degree of intensification takes place, but this need not be allowed for in making the black-and-white print, as it gives an additional pleasing richness to the blacks."

    <hr>index<hr>





  2. #2
    Whatever David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Old Formulas: Paper

    Thanks, Paul! This post and the film developers post are great contributions to the forum.

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Old Formulas: Paper

    This is really great stuff. May I make a suggestion - can this be made part of the static content at lfphoto.info? That way, folks will not have to use the search terms and it will be more readily available. Cheers, DJ

  4. #4

    Old Formulas: Paper

    I am a long time user of several of the Agfa formulas, but have always seen them published as Ansco (or GAF) formulas. This post shows that they were developed by Agfa before the Agfa/Ansco merger in 1928.

  5. #5
    All metric sizes to 24x30 Ole Tjugen's Avatar
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    Old Formulas: Paper

    I'll have to check this (tomorrow, when I get home), but I thing the "AGFA 130" formula here is the Ansco 130 one. AGFA 130 is a completely different developer (without Glycin) - but I have the AGFA recipe collection at home and will check.

  6. #6

    Old Formulas: Paper

    Ole, that is what I noticed too. Agfa must have brought the 130 glycin formula (and many others) to the Agfa/Ansco merger in 1928, but then Ansco must have acquired the rights to publish the formulas when the companies were split up as a result of WWII. The formulas for 17, 17M, 20, 22, 30 X-ray, 40, 42, 45, 48M, 61, 64, 70, 72, 79, 81, 90, 103, 110, 113, 115, 120, 130, and 135 were published as Ansco formulas after the war.

  7. #7

    Old Formulas: Paper

    Hi there,

    Eric and Ole : you are probably correct, the booklet says Agfa on the front, copyright to GAF 1941 on the flyleaf and Agfa/Ansco on the rear. I guess these were changed to Ansco formulas after the war. I just entered what was there. Why would Agfa use the same numbers twice?

  8. #8

    Old Formulas: Paper

    Thanks Paul. I thought you were working with a pre-1928 publication. It could be, then, that Agfa had a developer 130 and Ansco also had a developer 130 when they merged in 1928. Agfa Ansco became part of General Aniline & Film (GAF) in 1939.

  9. #9
    All metric sizes to 24x30 Ole Tjugen's Avatar
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    Old Formulas: Paper

    Back home now...

    I was right. Im my "Agfa Rezepte", published by Filmfabrik Agfa Wolfen (and stamped "VEB"), Agfa 130 is a "hard special developer for momento-postcards".

    Agfa kept the Agfa numbers, Ansco kept the Ansco numbers, and all were prefaced with the correct producer.

    BTW, there are no Ansco recipes in the Agfa book. Agfa 122 is a glycin/hydrochinon developer.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    The "Live Free or Die" state
    Posts
    633

    Old Formulas: Paper

    Regarding the Agfa 120 developer. This is a completely different version from the one listed in "the Darkroom Cookbook" as Agfa 120 Brown-Tone Paper Developer. What is the story? Is this really an Ansco formula, or is the one in the book an Ansco formula?

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