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Thread: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

  1. #1

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    View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    If you watch the videos on youtube of Mike Kelley for Interior/Architectural Photography, you will notice that he lights the spaces little by little and he blends them together in photoshop.

    I need to shoot my projects and so I was thinking of getting a Canon 6d and a 17mm & a 24mm TS lens for this.

    I mentioned to a friend that it must have been difficult for film shooters during the day to have to light up the whole space and shoot it in one go. He then said, we could use film but shoot multiple exposures, lighting up the area little by little.

    Does anyone have any experience doing this? Any tips?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    "Painting with light," i.e., setting up your camera in the dark, and then walking through the scene with a floodlight or such and illuminating the scene little-by-little, giving more light where you want it and less where you don't, is a time-honored method. I've done it with good results occasionally. It requires that you know your light intensity and exposure in advance, but allows you to work on one sheet of film.

    A similar method is simply lighting one area at a time, leaving the others dark, and closing the shutter between lighting changes, basically making a multiple exposure, except that it's really a cumulative exposure, since the each area of the scene only gets exposed once.

    If you're thinking of getting a Canon 6D, you're in the wrong forum here...

    Best,

    Doremus

  3. #3

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    I've done multiple exposures with film for interiors for a long time, not only for balancing exposures, but also for filtering different light sources. Gets complicated very quickly

    Kumar

  4. #4
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    I've opened the shutter in a dark room and illuminated the room with multiple electronic flashes as Doremus and Kumar mention. It requires care to avoid getting yourself or unwanted light in the photo, and comfort in working in total darkness.

  5. #5
    bdkphoto
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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by macolive View Post
    If you watch the videos on youtube of Mike Kelley for Interior/Architectural Photography, you will notice that he lights the spaces little by little and he blends them together in photoshop.

    I need to shoot my projects and so I was thinking of getting a Canon 6d and a 17mm & a 24mm TS lens for this.

    I mentioned to a friend that it must have been difficult for film shooters during the day to have to light up the whole space and shoot it in one go. He then said, we could use film but shoot multiple exposures, lighting up the area little by little.

    Does anyone have any experience doing this? Any tips?

    Thanks!
    I almost always lit my interiors in one go when I used film. I would balance lighting by turning off or light banks for portions of the exposure or multiple pops of strobe on occasion.
    The 6D and TSEs are the way to go now.

  6. #6

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    "Painting with light," i.e., setting up your camera in the dark, and then walking through the scene with a floodlight or such and illuminating the scene little-by-little, giving more light where you want it and less where you don't, is a time-honored method. I've done it with good results occasionally. It requires that you know your light intensity and exposure in advance, but allows you to work on one sheet of film.

    A similar method is simply lighting one area at a time, leaving the others dark, and closing the shutter between lighting changes, basically making a multiple exposure, except that it's really a cumulative exposure, since the each area of the scene only gets exposed once.

    If you're thinking of getting a Canon 6D, you're in the wrong forum here...

    Best,

    Doremus
    I'm going to give it a try (light painting) with my 4x5 and see how that works out.

  7. #7

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by bdkphoto View Post
    I almost always lit my interiors in one go when I used film. I would balance lighting by turning off or light banks for portions of the exposure or multiple pops of strobe on occasion.
    The 6D and TSEs are the way to go now.

    It's certainly easier to go that route...but imagine how much 4x5 film I can buy instead of a 6d and TS lenses :-)

  8. #8

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by B.S.Kumar View Post
    I've done multiple exposures with film for interiors for a long time, not only for balancing exposures, but also for filtering different light sources. Gets complicated very quickly

    Kumar
    Exactly! I've seen how some have to change the lightbulbs to slave flashes just to get consistent color.

  9. #9

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    I've opened the shutter in a dark room and illuminated the room with multiple electronic flashes as Doremus and Kumar mention. It requires care to avoid getting yourself or unwanted light in the photo, and comfort in working in total darkness.

    I've tried it on digital and I always manage to see the light source or myself in the image...which of course is easy to remove in digital.

  10. #10

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    Re: View Camera for Interiors and Lighting

    If I remember correctly, when he worked for the US Forest Service back in the '30s, Saint Ansel used to light interiors he was photographing with his LF cameras using a light bulb in a metal reflector to paint the walls with light.

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