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Thread: B&W PAPER processing machines

  1. #1

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    B&W PAPER processing machines

    Now.. with the announcement of that new galaxy 120 speed reversal paper.. it got me thinking about using one of those old ..stabilization machines..I think they were called..to process the paper

    then ..I found that fujimoto still makes processing machines.. and there are plenty around on ebay (costly..yes..but...)

    anyone here familiar enough with the machines to hazard a guess if they can be adapted to the chemical process (whatever it will be) for the Galaxy paper??


    just thinking out load about a scenario involving an 8x10, or 11x14 even camera, holders loaded with the galaxy reversal paper... and some kind of dark tent thing with a paper processor in it - toss in a Honda generator and..well..there ya go

  2. #2

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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    I have no idea how the processing machines work, but reversal processing is well-understood (I outlined it here http://www.largeformatphotography.in...=1#post1262951) so if the Fujimoto can manage at the very least a 7-bath sequence (in practical reality more steps are required to allow for washes) then you're off and running ...

  3. #3
    IanG's Avatar
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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    This Galaxy paper is reversal process and the machines you think of aren't suitable.

    For a few years aI used an Ilfoprint processor for Ilfospeed paper, as I;m a photo-chemist anyway I made my own solutions an Activator and I used fixer t=rather than stabiliser.

    Ian

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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    Quote Originally Posted by IanG View Post
    This Galaxy paper is reversal process and the machines you think of aren't suitable.

    For a few years aI used an Ilfoprint processor for Ilfospeed paper, as I;m a photo-chemist anyway I made my own solutions an Activator and I used fixer t=rather than stabiliser.

    Ian
    are there any machines that might be fiddled with to work?

    seems like a great new product w/o a good processing scheme

  5. #5
    IanG's Avatar
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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    Quote Originally Posted by DrTang View Post
    are there any machines that might be fiddled with to work?

    seems like a great new product w/o a good processing scheme
    There could be if you're a chemist and can sort out the right balance of the chemical steps but you've got a bleach stage which will need to use Permanganate or Dichromate in a weak sulphuric acid solution. It's essentially the same as a B&W photo booth where the paper is process by a dunk dip method.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    Stabilization machines were only 2-bath, and very fast, the paper was only in each bath for < 30 seconds, maybe even shorter than that.

    I have a few Fujimotos: CP31 and CP51. They are basically 3-bath + wash in normal configuration. The CP-51 does have add-on modules that are basically more baths, that can be strung together - these were used for Cibachrome processing.

    Depending on how many baths you need, they could be a good option. The temp and time is quite adjustable. They are robustly made of stainless, titanium, rubber and phenolic so they should be able to stand up to fairly intense chemistry. I use them for RA4 but they were built to handle B&W and Cibachrome as well.

    -Ed

  7. #7
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    I'm skeptical. Roller transport machines need RC paper, not fiber-based. The machines need good temp control and hookups. Then you've got safety/toxicity issues
    with an unventilated tent. That could hypothetically be fixed with a light-tight air exchange system. But it would be more sensible to set up something like this in
    a van or truck than a tent. But then you'd have chemicals sloshing around and cross-contaminating each other if you drove anywhere will the processor other than
    fully drained and fully rinsed out. There goes convenience. A simple drum processor would be easier in that respect. Or just build a tray ladder.

  8. #8

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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    you guys are harshing my mellow

    I was all set.. to gather up camera, a fly maybe, my Qflash and processor..and head out into the vast Midwest and northeast..grabbing people at will and setting them down to be photographed

    only to have an 8x10 or 11x14 print..like 3 minutes later

    how sweet would that be?

    to dream...

  9. #9
    IanG's Avatar
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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Wiley View Post
    I'm skeptical. Roller transport machines need RC paper, not fiber-based. The machines need good temp control and hookups. Then you've got safety/toxicity issues
    with an unventilated tent. That could hypothetically be fixed with a light-tight air exchange system. But it would be more sensible to set up something like this in
    a van or truck than a tent. But then you'd have chemicals sloshing around and cross-contaminating each other if you drove anywhere will the processor other than
    fully drained and fully rinsed out. There goes convenience. A simple drum processor would be easier in that respect. Or just build a tray ladder.
    Actually you're wrong the older activator/stabiliser papers were fibre based and went through two bath roller transport machines. I used quite a bit of it while at University in 1972 although I tray processed. Also colour papers were once all FB as well so I don't think this is an issue.

    Ian

  10. #10

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    Re: B&W PAPER processing machines

    The problem with fiber-base paper is the washing and drying. That's why RC paper was introduced- for fast machine processing. Machines like Kodak's Royalprint were the successor to stabilization processors, which have been gone a long time. The RP used EK papers that were developer-incorporated (with a II in the title IIRC) and an activator solution (with a pH of about 11) instead of developer. That machine was introduced around 1986, and i'm sure its chemistry is as long-gone as Kodak paper

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