Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    8,192

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    Epson Scan by default will offer corrections but we can remove them entirely. Unfortunately - as you point out - we need to adjust each scan individually.

    This is better than VueScan because VueScan imposes corrections which cannot be disabled. We can choose a profile and combination of settings to mitigate them, but we can't step around them, only choose the lesser evil.
    As usual, I did not know this. I think we need to ask http://www.hamrick.com/ why he would do this. Seems odd for his software to be limited. He seems to support all kinds of variations. Another question I have for him, what are his legacy plans?

    I have read Ken Lee's excellent scanning tips for both Epsonware and Vuescan. I use his recommendations.

  2. #12
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    408

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    I've followed Ken's tips as well, and a big thank you Ken for taking the time to put them online.

    My problem is I am a lazy, lazy man and I hate scanning film and screwing around with digital files so I normally just let the scanner to its bad job and move on. I just wish there was a way to get a decent, flat scan that captured as much detail as possible without having to jump through crazy hoops. Especially since I am only scanning to post images online, I get frustrated that the time to scan a roll of B&W film at medium resolution (2400 dpi) on an Epson V700 is longer than the time it takes to develop it and print a contact sheet.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts USA
    Posts
    7,797

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    My problem is I am a lazy, lazy man and I hate scanning film and screwing around with digital files
    Rather than shooting roll-film to get online photos in a hurry, perhaps you'd be better off with a digital camera and simple software like iPhoto or Picasa. Import the photos, upload them and you're done with a few clicks.

    If for some reason you need roll film but don't want to scan it yourself, you can send it out to a service and get back a disk and upload those files with a few clicks.

    Another option would to get a real film scanner which properly handles roll film: a film scanner rather than a flatbed. Some of them are designed to handle a roll at a time, or at least a number at a time.

  4. #14
    jp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    4,488

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    In epson professional mode, preview window, use the "Normal" tab rather than the "Thumbnail" tab. This will remember settings for each marquee'd scan area (negative) between prescans and scans. If your negatives are similar, it saves a bunch of time. Even if exposure changes, the most you have to change are the pointers at the endpoints of the histogram. Saves having to redo a bunch of settings for every scan. I'd still hate to use the scanner for bulk 35mm scanning. I just use it for LF and MF.

    Ken's tips are good.

    I've found scanners to be able to scan a bigger range than I can wet print. This is normally meaningless as exposure and development are traditionally used to present a realistic range for output. But if you get the sun in a photo, you can adjust curves and show extreme highlights that are unprintable, particularly with films that capture the long range like tmax 400 / portra 160.

  5. #15
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    408

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    Rather than shooting roll-film to get online photos in a hurry, perhaps you'd be better off with a digital camera and simple software like iPhoto or Picasa. Import the photos, upload them and you're done with a few clicks.
    Sorry I was a bit flippant, the rest of the story is that I enjoy making contact sheets and prints in the darkroom. Those are my "real" pictures. The stuff I post online is what it is. I take my time in the dark to make a good print, but I find it frustrating trying to make a "good" scan so I'm only willing to do so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Lee View Post
    If for some reason you need roll film but don't want to scan it yourself, you can send it out to a service and get back a disk and upload those files with a few clicks.

    Another option would to get a real film scanner which properly handles roll film: a film scanner rather than a flatbed. Some of them are designed to handle a roll at a time, or at least a number at a time.
    If I had a lab with a scanner within 2000 km I'd consider going that route, but it's more likely that I should drop the big bucks for a roll film scanner. Believe me I have thought about it. Just hard to drop $2K when there are so many other expenses like film, paper, etc.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    1,248

    Re: Dynamic range of scanners compared with photographic paper?

    I bit the bullet and got a Nikon Coolscan for MF - it's wonderful compared to the Epson.

    The sweet spot format wise for the epson is 5 x 7 (or 5 x 8 if you're so inclined) because it still fits in the higher resolution band. I always wet mount for the Epson - quick and painless.

Similar Threads

  1. Acros Dynamic Range
    By Adam Kavalunas in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-Apr-2011, 12:02
  2. Dynamic range of (new) Ektar 100
    By Lachlan 717 in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-Nov-2010, 14:15
  3. What does Dynamic Range Mean?
    By Michael Heald in forum On Photography
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2007, 04:01
  4. dynamic range vs 'dynamic range'
    By jonpiper in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2005, 01:39
  5. Dynamic Range with Azo, Pt/Pd, etc
    By Ken Lee in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Jun-2005, 13:12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •