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Thread: Digital Silver

  1. #21
    New Orleans, LA
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    493

    Re: Digital Silver

    Bob,

    Thanks for your answer. I certainly understand, as a business owner, making digital prints. About 1/3 of my business prior to the digital revolution was making exhibition prints for other photographers and I saw that go away quickly. For me, it was welcome in that I wanted to do more commercial and editorial work and simply print for myself. I appreciate that you have remained relevant in the print making world and, with your Large silver film, seem to be revolutionizing the way prints are made. Kudos to you for keeping the tradition alive and growing.

    "...and very unique a mint 11 x14 Deveere Vertical enlarger for up to 11 x14 film." Dammit Bob! I've just started shooting 11x14 and I just may have to see one of those big-ass negs blown up as large as possible.

    Talk to you soon,

    Thom

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    282

    Re: Digital Silver

    Bob, Thanks for such a thorough explanation on the process involved. I'm certainly willing to give it a spin when you are fully up and running in your new location. It seems like the "soul" of manual printing still exists with the lambda projection and the use of chemistry... Some would probably argue that unless you touch the wet paper with your bare hands, you miss out on an existential connection with your picture. I'm at a point when I've started trusting my decisions and gut calls when developing the film itself, and am excited about the possibility of learning the dark arts of printing, but until then it would be nice to have to surrogate prints that I have some control over as far as the final output.

  3. #23
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    6,346

    Re: Digital Silver

    Quote Originally Posted by bob carnie View Post
    I think I should clarify this a bit.. I have split Elevator into two different companys.. My long time business partner is keeping the name Elevator Digital Ltd.
    I am starting a smaller fine art lab and have moved to a second location on Toronto.s Subway System. The Lambda and enlargers and scanners are with me, as well I have opened an exhibition space.
    total 3000sq ft on two floors , I have been here for two weeks now and finding my way. The move was very , very difficult .
    Bob - thanks for the update, and good luck! Thanks also for linking the "patersoncarnie" site in your signature - great to see what you've been up to.

  4. #24
    bob carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario,
    Posts
    3,998

    Re: Digital Silver

    we process the rolls of lambda paper by hand... different from all the other vendors.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deval View Post
    Bob, Thanks for such a thorough explanation on the process involved. I'm certainly willing to give it a spin when you are fully up and running in your new location. It seems like the "soul" of manual printing still exists with the lambda projection and the use of chemistry... Some would probably argue that unless you touch the wet paper with your bare hands, you miss out on an existential connection with your picture. I'm at a point when I've started trusting my decisions and gut calls when developing the film itself, and am excited about the possibility of learning the dark arts of printing, but until then it would be nice to have to surrogate prints that I have some control over as far as the final output.

  5. #25
    tgtaylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    3,852

    Re: Digital Silver

    Food for thought:

    The film negative offers the greatest tonal range, providing
    subtleties of tones that the digital negative could not produce.
    The conjecture was dots making up the inkjet negative are at
    one level but the silver analogue negative provides a gradation
    of tones. Additionally, a relief of different levels in the film
    emulsion offers further dimensions. PMK developer formed the
    greatest relief in the film emulsion.

    The successful salted paper print requires a negative with a
    long tonal range and sufficient density for enough silver
    chloride to change into image making metallic silver during
    exposure. Extensive testing proved that Ilford FP4 negatives
    processed in the double strength PMK developer provided an
    excellent continuous tone, and produced the extra density
    desirable for salt printing. The inkjet negatives with similar
    colours to the FP4/PMK negative proved to surpass a number
    of other types of analogue film negatives tested.
    Negatives with inadequate tonal ranges and density failed to
    produce quality salt prints.


    Quoted from Mechanisms of Controlling Colour and Aesthetic Appearance of the Photographic Salt Print, A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for
    the degree of Master of Applied Science (Photography). Eleanor Young, 2008, page 58.

    Thomas

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