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Thread: Management for exposed film.

  1. #11
    Format Omnivore Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    The film septum cutout isn't for the ID tape. The ID notch on the holder itself. The holder ID notch is illustrated at the bottom of the Grafmatic brochure, figure 7 (link).

    I think the septum cutout is for easily identifying the film notch code.
    "It's the way to educate your eyes. Stare. Pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long." - Walker Evans

  2. #12
    Light Guru's Avatar
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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    In addition to notching my film holders I use the Reciprocity Timer App with the in app upgrade that lets you add photos to your exposure notes and mark zone notes on those photos. This can help matching up your developed negative to the notes.

    Because I reload holders while on trips with a changing bag/tentI have developed a folder system that I keep in a film box. I shoot B&W and use the zone system for exposure and developing so I have a folder for N N-1 N-2 N+1 and N+2. When unloading a film holder I will put the undeveloped sheet in the corresponding folder thus making it easy to develop all the sheets that need the same development time together.
    Zak Baker
    zakbaker.photo

    "Sometimes I do get to places just when God's ready to have somebody click the shutter."
    Ansel Adams

  3. #13
    Youngin Daniel Stone's Avatar
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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    I've found that using a SINGLE box(when traveling "light" or when I don't want multiple, partially-filled boxes), and GOOD RECORDS of each sheet shot(and then loaded into the box in the same order) is the easiest method for me. I just start from the last exposed sheet of film I've put into the box(so the one on the top), and then go backwards, separating out the film into each category(push, pull, normal, etc...)

    Hasn't failed me yet, but when possible, I still prefer separating film out into different boxes. Overseas travel and carrying film in my carry-on, however, limits me to one box usually, sometimes two, of exposed film. Depending on the amount of shots I've made though

    -Dan

  4. #14
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    One box + field notes sounds familiar to me.

    On a recent trip, I had only one film-storage box so I had to make careful notes about which sheet was on the bottom, which sheet was on top of that one, etc. When I got home, first thing I did was split the sheets into their appropriate boxes (N-1, N, N+1); I knew that if I didn't split the sheets soon after my return, I’d either lose my field notes, or the notes would, eventually, stop making sense to me.

    BTW, splitting a stack of sheets into multiple boxes, in the dark, is more confusing than it sounds! It takes some pre-planning before you switch off the lights. The job might take a few sessions, since you can assign only as many sheets to their boxes as you can memorize from your notes.

  5. #15
    Light Guru's Avatar
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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Heroique View Post
    BTW, splitting a stack of sheets into multiple boxes, in the dark, is more confusing than it sounds! It takes some pre-planning before you switch off the lights. The job might take a few sessions, since you can assign only as many sheets to their boxes as you can memorize from your notes.
    That's why I made a folder system that I keep inside the one box.
    Zak Baker
    zakbaker.photo

    "Sometimes I do get to places just when God's ready to have somebody click the shutter."
    Ansel Adams

  6. #16

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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Barlow View Post
    Number your holders, using a Sharpie to put the number on the white part.

    Then use small files to notch the fold-over part of the bottom. I use Roman numerals - 1s on one side, a 5-notch in the middle, and 10s opposite the 1s. The notches will show on the film edge of your proofs.

    A notebook keeps notes by holder number, and if you use the same number multiple times, you'll still be able to figure out which is which. I suppose you could have separate empty film boxes for each run-through of numbers, but that's probably overkill

    I have 30 4x5, 24 5x7, and 22 8x10 holders, all using this system. Works like a charm. All credit to Richard Ritter, who showed it to me.
    I use a similar system; good field notes coupled with Roman numerals filed into the filmholder flaps. Each holder side has a consecutive number written on it with a Sharpie in the appropriate space or on a label. The field notes have holder number and developing scheme info. The notches are useful for identifying which duplicate neg got which development, or for diagnosing problems (light leaks, all my N+1 times seem to be too short, etc., etc.)

    I use a small round file for the "ones" notches, a "V"-shaped notch for the "fives," a square notch for the "tens," an "L"-shaped notch (a slight flat notch with a longer "tail") for the "fifties," and a larger half-round notch for the "one-hundreds" (makes a "C"-shaped notch lying on its back).

    I've got about 75 holders (numbered 1-150) notched this way and it works great. The notches are exposed onto the film and are easy to read unless the area where the notches are is in the shadow. Still, I can always figure out which sheet goes with which holder from the subject matter.

    If you decide to notch just remember to not file too deeply, or you risk light leaks. I also find it useful to notch in reverse order so the Roman numeral code shows up correctly right-to-left on the negative.

    When traveling and needing to reload holders, I carry empty film boxes labeled "N," N+1" and "N-1." Usually I leave anything else (e.g., N-2, etc.) in the holder; unloading the Ns, N+1s and N-1s has always given me enough holders to reload. I do, however, keep three cardboard dividers in the film boxes and could, say, divide the N+ box into N+1s above the middle divider, N+2s below or the like, enabling me to unload everything from N-2 through N+2 into three boxes.

    An after-thought about field notes. I have a very small notebook (6 rings I think) in the States and an A6 notebook in Europe filled with homemade exposure record forms. These end up being stored with the negatives in a PrintFile storage binder. The negs go in pages, the records in stacks of four with the appropriate page in the ring binder. The records have date, place, title, Zone placement info, a space for calculating bellows extension and reciprocity failure, the filter used and factor, and development scheme chosen and given plus a place for notes. I find record-keeping indispensable.


    Best,

    Doremus

  7. #17

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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    Civich - thank you for your helpful photos

  8. #18

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    Re: Management for exposed film.

    12, You're welcome. But give credit where it's due - to J B Harlin's superb site which is a gold mine of information on LF techniques and practices:

    http://jbhphoto.com/blog/

    I met the man and his wife Susan a few years ago and they both are accomplished photographers who gracefully provide advice and enthusiasm to any who ask.

    Quote Originally Posted by 12pmc View Post
    Civich - thank you for your helpful photos

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