Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3111213
Results 121 to 130 of 130

Thread: How often do you tilt for Theo?

  1. #121

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,165

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    One can certainly differentiate diffraction between f/4 and f/22 on the LCD screen of a D800E in Live View, assuming the target is sufficiently defined. Just put your camera on a tripod, focus on the target in Live View, and compare the image at f/4 and f/22 using the Playback/Zoom In button to view at maximum magnification.

    There is no question but that the use of swings and tilts with view cameras can in many cases allow us to use the lens at a wider aperture and get equivalent depth of field, and greater sharpness, than just stopping down the lens. Diffraction is, as has been pointed out, a law of optics and just because it does not apply to one's specific kind of work does not mean that it does not apply at all in general view finder photography.

    To differentiate the effects of diffraction between f/32 and f/64 on a view camera would be a tall order. On the other hand, the difference in depth of field is not all that great either if you compare f/32 to f/64. A better test would be to compare the effects of diffraction and depth of field on the extremes, say f/8 and f/64.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 1-Apr-2014 at 19:30.
    http://www.sandykingphotography.com/
    For discussion and information about carbon transfer please visit the carbon group at Yahoo.
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...nTransfer/info

  2. #122
    Silver Fox
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    323

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    What I learned: You don't have to tilt very much--at all. I had a very hard time with tilts--never could make them work--because I tilted much too much. A little goes a long way. Better to creep up on the plane of focus than tilt right through it and then wonder, like I did: What the heck?
    Peter Collins

    "Growing older is not for sissies." --anon.

  3. #123
    tgtaylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    3,802

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    I think it's important to remember that using the focus on the near and tilt for the rear method as set out in the Fred Newman link above establishes a plane of focus encompassing those two points. By definition a plane is a two dimensional object in space and has no depth or volume - length and width only. To establish the volume you stop down. The "how to" books that I consulted when first starting out in LF didn't explain that and I would go through endless repetitions of focusing on the near point and tilting for the rear point before I finally (!) decided to just to stop down and see. In reflecting back on that, I think it was due to the absence of depth of field scales on LF lens and that I had the mistaken idea that it wasn't necessary to stop down with LF lens: just focus and tilt and everything will be kosher. You can also achieve the same result by using the hypofocal point as you would with a 35 or MF camera with DOF scales on the lens by simply noting the position of the standard at the near and far point and positioning it exactly halfway between those two points on the rail/bed and then stopping down to bring everything into sharp focus. Having two methods to arrive at the same result is sometimes handy.

    Thomas

  4. #124

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    1,688

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    One can certainly differentiate diffraction between f/4 and f/22 on the LCD screen of a D800E in Live View, assuming the target is sufficiently defined. Just put your camera on a tripod, focus on the target in Live View, and compare the image at f/4 and f/22 using the Playback/Zoom In button to view at maximum magnification.

    There is no question but that the use of swings and tilts with view cameras can in many cases allow us to use the lens at a wider aperture and get equivalent depth of field, and greater sharpness, than just stopping down the lens. Diffraction is, as has been pointed out, a law of optics and just because it does not apply to one's specific kind of work does not mean that it does not apply at all in general view finder photography.

    To differentiate between f/32 and f/64 on a view camera would be a tall order. On the other hand, the difference in depth of field is not all that great either if you compare f/32 to f/64. A better test would be to compare the effects of diffraction and depth of field on the extremes, say f/8 and f/64.

    Sandy
    Finally a post I can agree with. And similar to what I wrote in post #8 of this thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Miller View Post
    From a technical point of view, you can make a decision based on the f-stop required to get the depth of field that you need. Most lenses are at their optimal sharpness at a middle f-stop. Let's say that, for a given lens, once you stop down past f32 you start losing sharpness due to diffraction (and many will argue that diffraction is not worth worrying about with LF). So if you find yourself stopping down to f64, that would be a reason to use tilt, so that you can achieve the depth of field that you want, while also using a more optimal f-stop.

  5. #125
    Cor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Leiden, The Netherlands
    Posts
    632

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Miller View Post
    Finally a post I can agree with. And similar to what I wrote in post #8 of this thread:
    Hear hear!

    I never denied the scientific fact of diffraction, but in real life in ones own situation one may or may not notice it, that's why I wrote up the circumstances of my latest shoot (applicable only to in this case, doing table top is different, landscape is different) as in post #103.

    That Drew saw the need to belittle me and draw definitive conclusions is annoying.

    Academic discussions are nice (and I am an academic) but in the end we are trying to help those starting out in the field, aren't we ?

    Best,

    Cor

  6. #126
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,561

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    I was admittedly being ornery, but I never implied the usage of the technical facts had to be religiously applied, just acknowledged. What seems "academic" to one
    person might be bread and butter to another. If a sniper is off 3%, it's significant.

  7. #127
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Humboldt County, CA
    Posts
    6,370

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    I did use a little bit of tilt for this image.

    4x5 PocketView, 150mm/5.6 Caltar II-N
    TMax 100 in HC-110

    Mistaking the Map for the Territory
    Sentinel Dome

    (yes, that is my hand -- the other is operating the cable release)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mistaking the Map for the Territory, YNP_16x20.jpg  
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  8. #128
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,561

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    That's classic, Vaughn!

  9. #129
    Sibben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    35

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    Amazing picture, Vaughn.

  10. #130

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    308

    Re: How often do you tilt for Theo?

    Use tilt almost always unless subject is so 3-dimensional, movements have no benefit. And if the latter is the situation will focus mid subject, stop down to the max, to hell with diffraction. However usually when a subject is that difficult won't even bother. More often am looking for subjects where besides being aesthetic/interesting, I can adjust camera position and use movements to get a full frame in acceptable focus for a large print.

    Tilt of course is just part of movements. Here is an example of an oblique sloping subject on an even plane where the frame is closer at bottom than top and horizontally closer on the right than left. For that I used a combination of tilt and swing. With an ideal subject one can then open a lens up more to the sharpest aperture with best image quality. In this case I also stopped down a bit more simple because at each point on the average plane of flowers there was also depth between the flower tops and stems/leaves below. One of the great things about using a view camera is there is much for the skilled mind to think about.


Similar Threads

  1. Front Tilt or Reat Tilt on a Linhof Tech... Which Do You Use?
    By Scott Rosenberg in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 18-Sep-2017, 09:48
  2. Base Tilt versus Axis Tilt
    By Ty G in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 6-May-2010, 12:22
  3. Center/Axis Tilt vs Base Tilt
    By Greg Liscio in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 9-Jun-2009, 10:31
  4. Axial Tilt vs. Base Tilt Pro's and Con's
    By Robert J Pellegrino in forum Cameras & Camera Accessories
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 8-Jul-2000, 12:42
  5. Newbie Q: rear tilt vs. front tilt
    By Todd Caudle in forum Style & Technique
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 5-Dec-1999, 21:07

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •