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Thread: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

  1. #61

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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Don't try bribing the same ranger with counterfeit money a second time.
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.
    I'm not OCD. I'm CDO which is alphabetically correct.

  2. #62

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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    But on the other hand, time is not cheap -- and I think, "Is it worth my time to process the film if I take this image?"

    Or if I am away from the car all day and have only 5 to 7 holders, "Will there something more worthwhile around the corner for my last two holders for the day?" (I usually get back to the van at dark).
    Once I'm home, what do I have better to do? Good music in the dark and I'm happy to slosh negatives. A few more won't matter.

    Sometimes I have run out of holders, but not typically. I have many, and usually have them all near at hand.

    Besides, somtimes I surprise myself. Wouldn't it be a bummer if I passed up what might have been a real keeper?
    Bruce Barlow
    author of "Finely Focused" and "Exercises in Photographic Composition"
    www.brucewbarlow.com

  3. #63
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Because I am an IDIOT:

    All my lenses and small bits are stored in Crown Royal bags (bought on e-Bay for ~ $1 each). When re-packing the camera bag . . .if there is an empty CR bag laying around, something is still out.
    Drew Bedo
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  4. #64

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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    To have energy for the creative parts of photography, less energy needs to be used on the routine parts. I run through the routine fast. F A S T: Focus, Aperture, Shutter, Think. For example, I hate exposing film at f/6.3 (Protar) because I forgot to close the aperture to f/22.

  5. #65
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Barlow View Post
    Once I'm home, what do I have better to do? Good music in the dark and I'm happy to slosh negatives. A few more won't matter.

    Sometimes I have run out of holders, but not typically. I have many, and usually have them all near at hand.

    Besides, somtimes I surprise myself. Wouldn't it be a bummer if I passed up what might have been a real keeper?
    In a couple of years my time might be as easily spent developing negatives. You make a good point, but it is more motivating for me to develop negatives that I was emotionally involved with in the field. I do expose some film on what may be marginal compositions in the hopes of being pleasantly surprised. I like surprises. And I occasionally make an image that may have a low chance of success, but provides a bit of a challenge either technically or compositionally, or both.

    And I do have to be aware of 'canyon fever' -- my urge to get as far into a canyon as I can go, unwilling to set up the camera because I need to see what is around the corner. There is no known cure, but I am on a 12-step program. When canyon fever hits, I take 12 steps and stop. I plant the tripod and take a good all around, then take another 12 steps. If you hear, "One step, two steps, three steps...twelve steps!" echoing down from a canyon in Death Valley next week -- that will be me.

    My routine when using the camera is right before I pull the darkslide, I fire the shutter (this makes sure I closed the preview switch on Copal shutters) then re-cock it, or check that the lens cap is on my barrel lenses. I had already checked the aperture/shutter speed before I put in the darkslide, but I may double-check it before pulling the darkslide.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  6. #66
    (Shrek)
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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    My routine when using the camera is right before I pull the darkslide, I fire the shutter (this makes sure I closed the preview switch on Copal shutters) then re-cock it...
    +1 (don't ask...)

  7. #67
    John Olsen
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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    All of these are good reminders. Some of them might slide out of this grey head if I don't get reminded frequently.

    As for me, I'm all for insurance exposures: You're there and waiting for the perfect light... go ahead and take one just to make sure you come back with something. Maybe it will work out, maybe it will be a chance to try a novel filter solution to a difficult condition.

    Also, toss a crescent wrench in the truck for removing those pesky "speed limit/no parking" signs from a critical viewpoint. I'm not saying to remove a stop sign or anything, but a few minutes without a "deer crossing" sign isn't going to hurt anyone. A broom for cleaning roadside debris is nice, as is a step ladder. How about traffic cones?

    And don't forget that anything that you stick in a pocket is going to pop out and roll over the cliff. That's what zippers and flaps are for. (Lens cap in a moat, rail knob over a cliff, static brush box into a canyon, etc.)

    As for Pentax Spotmeters, I find that they are most likely to hide on top of your vehicle, not on the ground, so they can slide off when you drive away.

    It's a good thing this is a hobby and not a job.

  8. #68
    Land-Scapegrace Heroique's Avatar
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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    Quote Originally Posted by John Olsen View Post
    And don't forget that anything that you stick in a pocket is going to pop out and roll over the cliff. That's what zippers and flaps are for. (Lens cap in a moat, rail knob over a cliff, static brush box into a canyon, etc.)
    Yes, the last thing I do before I slip-on my pack is confirm all pockets are zipped shut.

    My Kelty Redwing pack has side pockets that are famous for ejecting items when not zipped. My pack has proved the general rule. More than once. A compass here. A Swiss Army Knife there.

    A confirming glance is now a habit whether I'm hiking w/ LF gear or not.

  9. #69

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    Re: Your #1 tip that even grey-templed landscapers might adopt

    I use a plain old canvas carpenter's apron. Home Depot, $1. Try to find a plain one, without the HD logo, which is way too orange.

    On the right side, I've tied the nylon meter case that holds my Pentax Digital Spotmeter. It's tied to the apron string so that it doesn't slide. I have a lanyard attached to the meter and the apron that barely stops the meter from crashing on the rocks when I drop it, but is still long enough to let me use the meter. I have a thingie on the lens cap that wraps around the meter so I don't lose the lens cap, neither. It is easily accessible.

    On the other side (which I think is left), I have a small digital camera case that holds a small Leatherman, screwdriver, extra meter battery, Post-Its (great for marking film holders), Lens Pen, and other small needed items. It holds my red Zone VI Exposure Notebook, occasionally available on eBay for $80. I use it to mark where I want to place the tripod when I'm seeking out a picture. Marking the spot beats carrying around a heavy camera and tripod, and being a geezer, the spot is rarely more than 100 yards from the van. You youngsters can go backpack.

    The left pocket of the apron holds up to 5 unexposed 4x5 holders or 2 unexposed 5x7s. The right pocket holds up to 5 exposed 4x5 holders or 2 exposed 5x7s. The sides are not interchangeable - unexposed 4x5s jump out of the exposed side like magnets repelling each other. It's amazing to see. It's nice, though, because the camera operator is never confused, nor in the excitement of the moment makes an accidental overexposure.

    This same operator was integrally involved in the development of the Zone VI apron, now available occasionally on eBay for about $50. He has the prototype. He uses the cheap canvas one, and vastly prefers it.

    He has a classy one onto which he printed "Fine Focus Workshops" in a snazzy font. Sometimes when he is wearing it he is recognized on the streets and overwhelmed by flocks of beautiful women. Sometimes he is delusional.

    But delusional or not, the apron works.
    Bruce Barlow
    author of "Finely Focused" and "Exercises in Photographic Composition"
    www.brucewbarlow.com

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