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Thread: Wooden or leather portfolio case

  1. #21
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,602

    Re: Wooden or leather portfolio case

    You're not going to save a dime having a custom solander box made, even if you make it yourself; more likely, you're going to end up paying a lot more. But you could obtain something different looking that way. One time I did trade a print for a very nice big custom hardwood flat file cabinet. But naturally, most people who offer such services need the cash themselves. But it doesn't hurt to try.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Posts
    10,357

    Re: Wooden or leather portfolio case

    Quote Originally Posted by Tri Tran View Post
    Here are my custom made portfolio cases for my work. All prints are matted 20x24. It can hold 15 mounted prints and ready to go anytime. I love wood so this works for me perfectly.

    What does one of these cases weigh when filled with 15 mounted prints?

  3. #23
    Tri Tran's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Montreal , Canada. Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    1,231

    Re: Wooden or leather portfolio case

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon - HP Marketing View Post
    What does one of these cases weigh when filled with 15 mounted prints?
    I haven't weighted yet but assuming is about 15 lbs .

  4. #24
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    10,602

    Re: Wooden or leather portfolio case

    The weight issue is why various kinds of cases in museums, whether for art or scientific collections (like bug n' butterflies) were traditional made of basswood.
    But since basswood is now scarce and expensive, they're more likely to use an uglier lightwt substitute like ramin or poplar then overlay it with finish paper. Cherry
    wood is fairly light and also mills well, but is more costly than the ugly stuff. Ltwt plys with a hardwood veneer would also be candidates, but you've got to be
    careful, because some of the "green" ones without nasty glue have relatively weak cores, while traditional fin plys still tend to contain a lot of formaldehyde in the
    glue. I'll ask a few questions about current hardwd ply options once our plywood/hardwood specialty salesman shows up (who also happens to be a print collector!).

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