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View Full Version : Tri-X from '97. Anything to keep in mind when shooting with it?



welly
18-Oct-2012, 07:28
I was kindly given a half box of Tri-X which I'm going to assume has been stored properly. It's been frozen since I've had it about 6 months, at least. Is there anything I should concern myself with when shooting this film or given its unknown circumstances, don't save it for the Queen? I've read film loses a stop or thereabouts per decade. Is this reasonable or a bunch of old rubbish?

Frank Petronio
18-Oct-2012, 07:36
Sounds right to me. Eventually the emulsion lifts off but 15 years isn't that bad for B&W.

BrianShaw
18-Oct-2012, 07:37
I've read the same stuff too, but in practice I find the only things to really worry about when using old B&W film are composition, focus, and lighting. The other thing I worry about when using film that old is that people will think I'm a cheap-skate skin-flint. :)

E. von Hoegh
18-Oct-2012, 07:39
I've read the same stuff too, but in practice I find the only things to really worry about when using old B&W film are composition, focus, and lighting. The other thing I worry about when using film that old is that people will think I'm a cheap-skate skin-flint. :)

Silly wabbit. Tell them it's vintage film, very special.

welly
18-Oct-2012, 07:48
Awesome, thanks guys. Will give it a bit more exposure and see how I get on with it.

E. von Hoegh
18-Oct-2012, 07:57
Awesome, thanks guys. Will give it a bit more exposure and see how I get on with it.

Try it at ISO 100-125 or so. TX 320 really needs to be exposed at about 200 when it's fresh.

goamules
18-Oct-2012, 08:03
I have some from the mid 80s that has shot fine. No adjustments were made.

E. von Hoegh
18-Oct-2012, 08:10
I have some from the mid 80s that has shot fine. No adjustments were made.

Me too, but mine's been in the deep freeze since the late 80s.

Robbie Bedell
18-Oct-2012, 19:45
Shoot one frame and then process it to see if it is good. I bought a 100' roll of outdated Tri-X in 35mm here on the forum that the seller said had always been frozen. I shot one roll thinking it would be fine. When I pressed it I dicovered it was so badly fogged it was unprintable. I should have known better to test it first. Live and learn!! Robbie

http://robbiebedell.photoshelter.com

SamReeves
18-Oct-2012, 20:45
Can be a good basis for experimentation for the moldy Tri-X look. :)

jcoldslabs
19-Oct-2012, 04:20
I couldn't find a better example at the moment, but I shot this earlier in the year on Tri-X that expired in 1994. The film wasn't frozen that I was aware of. I rated it at EI 200 and processed it as I would fresh Tri-X. Worked fine for me. And I'm cheap, not vintage.


http://www.kolstad.us/ebay/Tri-X-%2894%29---Freeway.jpg

Jonathan

jnanian
19-Oct-2012, 05:42
i typically expose expired film from that vintage
both xxx and the max family ..

what developer are you using ?

when i am not using coffee for my developer
i use ansco 130 dilute 1:6 ( or 1:10 )
tray process for 8.5mins and don't have any problems
with fog or loss of speed ( i expose xxx at 200 ).
if you have dektol, you might consider 1:10 @10mins or 1:7 @7mins .

have fun with your film --

BrianShaw
19-Oct-2012, 07:54
I couldn't find a better example at the moment, but I shot this earlier in the year on Tri-X that expired in 1994. The film wasn't frozen that I was aware of. I rated it at EI 200 and processed it as I would fresh Tri-X. Worked fine for me. And I'm cheap, not vintage.

Jonathan... you film seems to have lost DoF: at a rate of about 1 stop per half-decade.

jcoldslabs
19-Oct-2012, 23:28
Jonathan... you film seems to have lost DoF: at a rate of about 1 stop per half-decade.

Ahh, yes, I forgot to mention that drawba....I mean benefit!

Jonathan