PDA

View Full Version : Removing stuck filters or step up adapter



Kirk Gittings
20-Mar-2012, 11:22
I had a seriously stuck step up adapter and just figured out a solution. In this case a 47XL and there was no way to get a grip on the lens cell. I cut a strip of the fuzzy side of self adhesive Velcro and put one on the lens side outside rim and one on the filter side outside rim-gave it a twist and they came right apart. The Velcro then came right off with no residue.

David Karp
20-Mar-2012, 11:57
Thanks for the tip Kirk!

JR Steel
3-May-2012, 21:04
I had a step ring jam to a polarizing filter. Of course the filter wants to spin. I found a pair of nitrile groves that I use in the darkroom in my pack and bingo - came right off.

James Hughes
3-May-2012, 21:40
I dropped a dslr and busted the haze filter that I had on it. The glass broke, and the ring wouldn't come off... I asked around and someone mentioned that you can push the lens against your shoe to grip the ring and turn the lens! It works;)

Jerry Bodine
4-May-2012, 11:40
Here is a solution that will most likely work well on your adapter or filters. Years ago I read in my Leica Manual that a stuck filter can be removed easily by pinching the filter's rim between your thumb and forefinger at one location on its circumference and turning the rim. The reason being that the usual method of placing the thumb on one side and the forefinger on the opposite side and squeezing causes the rim to become ovalized (allowed by the small gap between the filter and its rim), thus creating friction in the threads at the points where the rim's diameter tries to increase, and that friction is resisting the applied torque. I've found that this works very well.

E. von Hoegh
4-May-2012, 11:47
Here is a solution that will most likely work well on your adapter or filters. Years ago I read in my Leica Manual that a stuck filter can be removed easily by pinching the filter's rim between your thumb and forefinger at one location on its circumference and turning the rim. The reason being that the usual method of placing the thumb on one side and the forefinger on the opposite side and squeezing causes the rim to become ovalized (allowed by the small gap between the filter and its rim), thus creating friction in the threads at the points where the rim's diameter tries to increase, and that friction is resisting the applied torque. I've found that this works very well. A similar solution is pressing your palm against the front of the ring and turning.

Brian Ellis
4-May-2012, 12:53
A similar solution is pressing your palm against the front of the ring and turning.

I was typing the same suggestion when I saw yours. I've seen and used a lot of different methods, pushing the lens/filter hard against the palm of your hand and turning is the best and easiest I've found. You have to clean the filter afterwards but that's a small price to pay for getting it off the lens.

Joseph Dickerson
5-May-2012, 11:09
Often, the reason for the filter/adapter becoming stuck is that it and the lens barrel will expand/contract at differing rates with temperature changes. I've found that just wrapping my hand around them both will warm them both and the ring/filter will screw right off.

Obviously, this works only for temperature related issue, but it does work well on chilly mornings.

JD

E. von Hoegh
5-May-2012, 11:12
Often, the reason for the filter/adapter becoming stuck is that it and the lens barrel will expand/contract at differing rates with temperature changes. I've found that just wrapping my hand around them both will warm them both and the ring/filter will screw right off.

Obviously, this works only for temperature related issue, but it does work well on chilly mornings.

JD

And, it works only if the lens barrel and filter mount are of differing thermal expansion coefficients.
A wee bit of lube on the threads makes a huge difference.

Greg Lockrey
5-May-2012, 11:23
I use a rubber band about a 1/4" thick to use as a grip.... usually works for me. But before I put filters on, I rub a little graphite from a pencil on the threads first.