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t0aster
12-Mar-2012, 11:14
Hi all, I've been into photography going on 5 or 6 years now and have mostly only used my nikon d50 and my canon eos rebel film camera. I've been wanting to expand to either medium or large format for quite a while now and I am finally in a position to move up and I have decided to skip medium and head right into large format. After some lurking and quite a bit of time reading I want to get a rail camera and I think I might have found the one.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cambo-4x5-Large-Format-view-Camera-Caltar-ll-n-210-5-6-Lens-Case-Film-Holder-/320859841622?pt=Film_Cameras&hash=item4ab4bca456

"Included:
Cambo CS-2 4x5 View Camera
Caltar ll-N 1:5.6 F=210mm Lens (great condition no scratches)
Carrying case
Bellows (perfect condition, no light leaks)
Ground Glass (no scratches, horizontal and vertical)
Lens Board
Shutter Cable Release
Double Sided Film Holders (6)
Polaroid Back
Dark Cloth"

Everything looks to be in fine condition, just wanting to hear what some of you with more experience have to say. And if I am correct I'll only need to pick up a loupe and a decent tripod to place that monstrosity on (any suggestions?).

I want to move up to LF because, obviously, the high quality of the prints and the "hands on" quality of getting down and dirty with the process of taking pictures. I would like to use the camera for portraits, landscapes, and fine art (I'll be starting my bfa in photography next fall and this will be great preparation, and I'll also need an LF camera for the LF and studio lighting course I'll be taking).

Thanks for any advice you can share!

-David

DrTang
12-Mar-2012, 11:22
I used to have a Cambo SC2...and

what I can tell you is to get a Horseman L camera

that is a complete set..that went unsold..but I just never liked the SC

the Horseman OTOH I really liked..and probably should have kept.

my 2 pennies


you going to Brooks?

t0aster
12-Mar-2012, 11:26
I'll Look into the Horseman L, care to elaborate on why you like the Horseman over the Cambo?

I am not going to Brooks, looked into Hallmark in the northeast but it was just too much money to drop on a certificate program, so I am now a Math/Bfa in photography double major at the University of Iowa.

DrTang
12-Mar-2012, 12:06
the Horseman just feels..IDK..like a viewcamera should feel..the adjustments were solid and accurate..the cambo just felt ..rickety..

(the wrath of Cambo owners will now be upon me)

also.. if UoI requires viewcameras for a couple of it's courses..look in the local Craigslist around the end of the quarter - people might sell off their kits upon completion of the requirements

jwanerman
12-Mar-2012, 15:02
I have a used Sinar A-1 in excellent condition that will be up for sale. The price is $ 300 + shipping to your location. I can email you photos if you are interested.
Jeffrey Wanerman

Leszek Vogt
12-Mar-2012, 15:32
I'm sort of in similar situation as you - also starting out. Your rig is v. similar to my Calumet....and likely similar weight.
I just got 3-leg Feisol 3371 tripod that's rather stout and since it's carbon-fiber, it is also rather light. This will allow me
to hike and get away from the pavement. Sure you can spend 2X on Gitzo, etc, but that's up to you. I'm on the tall
side, so after mounting the Manfrotto gear head (410)....the GG of the camera will be little above my eyes...all good.
What's great is that I don't have the center column, which actually adds to instability. Not sure if I can be of much help
as to the lupe....there are many on the market....most LF guys feel that any decent quality (up to 6X) should do the job.
I guess it depends on you what quality you desire. I'd add few more things to your kit....besides film... (some of them
are 'must haves').

- Changing bag...to load film in the field if necessary
- Lens cleaning supplies + brush to clean film holders
- Air 'rocket'
- Extra film boxes to download film for processing
- Spot meter....you can use DSLR initially till you find nice digi Pentax, etc.
- Filters
- Extra lens/es

I'd suggest you check all the items you purchased thoroughly, especially the bellows and lens. Also, check the shutter for
accuracy and response. If it responds with sluggishness, then something is off and it may need lube or maintenance (or both ?).

I was wondering why would you go for BFA ?....most of this you can learn on your own and there are many resources available
and many resourceful folks right here on the forum. Anyway, enjoy.

Les

jp
12-Mar-2012, 15:50
Hi all, I've been into photography going on 5 or 6 years now and have mostly only used my nikon d50 and my canon eos rebel film camera. I've been wanting to expand to either medium or large format for quite a while now and I am finally in a position to move up and I have decided to skip medium and head right into large format. After some lurking and quite a bit of time reading I want to get a rail camera and I think I might have found the one.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cambo-4x5-Large-Format-view-Camera-Caltar-ll-n-210-5-6-Lens-Case-Film-Holder-/320859841622?pt=Film_Cameras&hash=item4ab4bca456

"Included:
Cambo CS-2 4x5 View Camera
Caltar ll-N 1:5.6 F=210mm Lens (great condition no scratches)
Carrying case
Bellows (perfect condition, no light leaks)
Ground Glass (no scratches, horizontal and vertical)
Lens Board
Shutter Cable Release
Double Sided Film Holders (6)
Polaroid Back
Dark Cloth"

Everything looks to be in fine condition, just wanting to hear what some of you with more experience have to say. And if I am correct I'll only need to pick up a loupe and a decent tripod to place that monstrosity on (any suggestions?).

I want to move up to LF because, obviously, the high quality of the prints and the "hands on" quality of getting down and dirty with the process of taking pictures. I would like to use the camera for portraits, landscapes, and fine art (I'll be starting my bfa in photography next fall and this will be great preparation, and I'll also need an LF camera for the LF and studio lighting course I'll be taking).

Thanks for any advice you can share!

-David

That's probably a $200 lens (quite common design)
maybe $100 worth of accessories (film holders, dark cloth, cable release) polaroid back is presently worthless.
On the classifieds here, someone is not getting $100 for a calumet view camera. A normal functional not-high-end-brand view camera can be had for $100-200 range pretty easily. That would be with case, bellows, groundglass, sometimes lensboard, etc...

If you stick around and gain access to the classifieds here, you'll get many good options every single day. You can get simple loupe or strong reading glasses; doesn't have to be too fancy. 4x5 doesn't qualify as monstrous, but it does require a heavier tripod than most dslrs. A used or new tiltall will be $100 and quite suitable. Don't buy anything cheaper, or anything pricey simply because it's lightweight.

You may also want the means to develop B&W film; which could be on the low end, some plastic storage drawers from walmart as trays, or more upscale would be a hp combiplan tank, btzs tubes, mod54 reel, or jobo drums, a thermometer, and some chemical storage bottles and measuring items.

t0aster
12-Mar-2012, 17:35
Leszek Vogt

I'm sort of in similar situation as you - also starting out. Your rig is v. similar to my Calumet....and likely similar weight.
I just got 3-leg Feisol 3371 tripod that's rather stout and since it's carbon-fiber, it is also rather light. This will allow me
to hike and get away from the pavement. Sure you can spend 2X on Gitzo, etc, but that's up to you. I'm on the tall
side, so after mounting the Manfrotto gear head (410)....the GG of the camera will be little above my eyes...all good.
What's great is that I don't have the center column, which actually adds to instability. Not sure if I can be of much help
as to the lupe....there are many on the market....most LF guys feel that any decent quality (up to 6X) should do the job.
I guess it depends on you what quality you desire. I'd add few more things to your kit....besides film... (some of them
are 'must haves').

- Changing bag...to load film in the field if necessary
- Lens cleaning supplies + brush to clean film holders
- Air 'rocket'
- Extra film boxes to download film for processing
- Spot meter....you can use DSLR initially till you find nice digi Pentax, etc.
- Filters
- Extra lens/es

I'd suggest you check all the items you purchased thoroughly, especially the bellows and lens. Also, check the shutter for
accuracy and response. If it responds with sluggishness, then something is off and it may need lube or maintenance (or both ?).

I was wondering why would you go for BFA ?....most of this you can learn on your own and there are many resources available
and many resourceful folks right here on the forum. Anyway, enjoy.

Les



Thanks for the extra advice! I plan on going to get an MFA, ultimately I'd like to run my own studio but I understand that it takes a while to build something like that up and with an MFA I could at least teach photography while building up the business, plus, I've thoroughly enjoyed the process of learning about art and studying it and learning from it.


That's probably a $200 lens (quite common design)
maybe $100 worth of accessories (film holders, dark cloth, cable release) polaroid back is presently worthless.
On the classifieds here, someone is not getting $100 for a calumet view camera. A normal functional not-high-end-brand view camera can be had for $100-200 range pretty easily. That would be with case, bellows, groundglass, sometimes lensboard, etc...

If you stick around and gain access to the classifieds here, you'll get many good options every single day. You can get simple loupe or strong reading glasses; doesn't have to be too fancy. 4x5 doesn't qualify as monstrous, but it does require a heavier tripod than most dslrs. A used or new tiltall will be $100 and quite suitable. Don't buy anything cheaper, or anything pricey simply because it's lightweight.

You may also want the means to develop B&W film; which could be on the low end, some plastic storage drawers from walmart as trays, or more upscale would be a hp combiplan tank, btzs tubes, mod54 reel, or jobo drums, a thermometer, and some chemical storage bottles and measuring items.

Thanks for that breakdown, I think I'll hold off and see if I can't find a better deal. Also, I'll have access to the darkrooms at school, but ultimately I do want to develop my own negatives at home but at first I may just take them to the local camera shop as they still will develop almost anything fortunately.

Frank Petronio
12-Mar-2012, 18:03
At the Buy It Now price of $575 it's not unreasonable but neither is it a great deal. I'd expect it to fetch in the low $400s which may not meet his reserve price dreams.

Tony Karnezis
12-Mar-2012, 19:45
Based on the size of the front element vs. the shutter, the lens in the ebay ad looks more like a 150 to me. (My 210 Caltar is definitely bigger.) Anyone else know for sure?

I would consider this Calumet CC400 for $90. You get the camera, case and 4 film holders. Just a lens & lens board & you're good to go.

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?87895-FS-Calumet-CC-400-Monorail-W-Calumet-Aluminum-Case-amp-4-Film-Holders

I would contact him before he puts it on ebay.

Tony Karnezis
12-Mar-2012, 19:52
On the classifieds here, someone is not getting $100 for a calumet view camera. A normal functional not-high-end-brand view camera can be had for $100-200 range pretty easily. That would be with case, bellows, groundglass, sometimes lensboard, etc...

Ah, I just read this post, David. We're talking about the same camera.

BrianShaw
12-Mar-2012, 19:56
Ditto Frank's comment.

As a camera it iis a quite satisfactory tool. I've been using one since 1980 oor so and have never been inspired enough to replace it.