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View Full Version : Using a "matte" spray in lieu of gettin AN glass...



Daniel Stone
30-Sep-2011, 14:16
hey all,

quick question: would using some sort of "matt(e)" spray allow me to not have to spend an exorbitant amount of money on getting a sheet of 11x14 AN glass(for my contact frame) cut/special ordered?

I'll admit it: I'm cheap... Has anyone ever used an aerosol spray to reduce/eliminate the problem with newton rings on color or b/w contact prints? 11x14 AN glass is expensive... and I see these "matte" sprays for like $10-15/can.

any ideas? Or anyone know of a place to get an glass cut for cheap(er)?

thanks

-Dan

Jon Shiu
30-Sep-2011, 15:35
Some people have reported using cheap non-glare picture framing glass. I haven't tried it but am planning to.

Jon

D. Bryant
30-Sep-2011, 16:14
hey all,

quick question: would using some sort of "matt(e)" spray allow me to not have to spend an exorbitant amount of money on getting a sheet of 11x14 AN glass(for my contact frame) cut/special ordered?

I'll admit it: I'm cheap... Has anyone ever used an aerosol spray to reduce/eliminate the problem with newton rings on color or b/w contact prints? 11x14 AN glass is expensive... and I see these "matte" sprays for like $10-15/can.

any ideas? Or anyone know of a place to get an glass cut for cheap(er)?

thanks

-Dan

Contact Bettersanning.com, they might be able to help you.

Drew Wiley
30-Sep-2011, 16:48
If you're talking about something in a spray can from a hardware or art store, really
bad idea. The heat of the enlarger might break it down in such a way that compounds
deleterious to your film or enlarger will be released. Besides, things like glass frosting or print/paint lacquer are going to diffuse a transmitted image. So if you go this route,
get Anti-Newton spray from one of the scanner or graphics suppliers. This is very fine
corn starch in aerosol convenience which can be applied to either the the film itself
(preferably), or to the negative carrier glass, and then can be safely removed later.

Drew Wiley
30-Sep-2011, 16:51
Answer to second half of ideas. Smooth optically-coated picture frame glass can
sometimes be used to supress Newton-rings, if you know a framer who has leftover
scraps. To purchase outright won't be any cheaper than real AN glass from someone
like Focal Point, and in my opinion is not as good an option. I've tested all kinds of it with mediocre results (at least in this foggy climate). Textured nonglare picture
glass or plastic, on the other hand. will diffuse the image to a considerable extent, so it worthless in an enlarger.

Jon Shiu
30-Sep-2011, 16:59
He wants it for a contact printing frame, not enlarger.

Jon

quine
30-Sep-2011, 17:14
I've had good luck with applying a thin residue of cornstarch to the glass.

To do this: rub the cornstarch on with a cotton ball, then wipe it off with a second fresh cotton ball. The glass should appear clear at this point, but there will be sufficient residue to keep the negative from contacting the glass. Note that I only do this for the top glass, since the bottom of the negative is usually rough enough on its own to prevent newton rings.

-andrew

Drew Wiley
30-Sep-2011, 17:24
No difference - contact frame or enlarger glass. UV printing lights for contact can get
pretty hot too. Optical framing glass tends to be very thin, so might break in a contact
frame. I'd just order up the correct stuff from Focal Point and be done with it. But
short of that, fine sifted cornstarch can be used. There's a distinct technique to it.
You put it in a little "puffer" plastic bottle, squeeze to get it into the air, and kinds
swish the film into the little cloud. The technique is described in quite a few old graphics arts or dye transfer printing manuals. Or order up the aerosol version.