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reallylongusername
13-May-2011, 21:50
I've been printing with an HP 2500cp to hp high gloss photo paper C3881A. I then coat a piece of sanded tempered hardboard with plain yellow wood glue and vacuum press the print to the wood. Works great and it very easy. Gives me a long time to adjust center and get to press. Now I have run out of C3881A. I bought Q1427A paper as HP has replaced 3881 with it. This paper cannot handle water based glue at all. It cockles like there is no tomorrow. I have had to switch to a solvent based glue. I use plain contact cement but my open time is reduced because it absorbs quickly into the wood. It also doesn't flow and I find small lumps under the print. I'm experimenting with thinning the contact cement but most solvents I've tried evaporate too quickly. Does anyone have experience with what I am doing and do you have a recommendation for better paper or adhesive?

Paul Fitzgerald
13-May-2011, 22:28
You could try 'Weldwood non-flammable contact cement' with the green label. Apply to your hardboard and let it flash for 10 - 15 min and press your print. Practice a few times to get the flash time down.

vinny
13-May-2011, 22:48
3M PMA, positional mounting adhesive.
amazon has it in rolls. get a brayer or other type of roller.

Mike Anderson
13-May-2011, 23:01
3M PMA, positional mounting adhesive.
amazon has it in rolls. get a brayer or other type of roller.

So the roller works better than the squeegee thingy that comes with the PMA roll?

...Mike

reallylongusername
14-May-2011, 06:37
3M PMA, positional mounting adhesive.
amazon has it in rolls. get a brayer or other type of roller.

A bit pricey for large (3'x4') prints. I worries me that I may see a seam since this stuff is only 16" wide.

Jim Becia
14-May-2011, 06:57
A bit pricey for large (3'x4') prints. I worries me that I may see a seam since this stuff is only 16" wide.

PMA comes in 24 inch rolls also. I have "seamed" two pieces together to mount larger prints without any problems. Just need to work carefully. I use both the squeegee and a roller with it. I've always liked PMA simply because no special equipment is needed. Jim

Mike Anderson
14-May-2011, 10:26
A bit pricey for large (3'x4') prints. I worries me that I may see a seam since this stuff is only 16" wide.

Note that the PMA sheet sheet doesn't remain between print and backing, you press it down and peel it off to leave a residue of adhesive. I'm just getting started with PMA myself, but I'm assuming you can overlap the sheets when applying, and when they're peeled off the residual adhesive will be even, because the overlapping adhesive will be stuck to the back of the other sheet leaving no seam or an inconsequential microscopic seam.

That's what I'm assuming, anyone with more experience comment care to comment?

...Mike

jhogan
14-May-2011, 10:46
I've used Rollataq liquid adhesive with success a number of times. It's water-based, simple to work with, and bonds to anything from plexiglas to plywood.

Other features: permanent, archival, acid free, and, most importantly, positionable for about 3-5 minutes. At about $7/bottle, it's cheap too.

Don't buy the applicator systems they sell with it; instead use a 6" foam "weenie roller" available in any home improvement paint department. Apply a thin coating to your substrate, then set your print on top, making sure it's in the position you desire.

Lay a piece of clean 6 mil polyethylene sheeting over the print.

Working from the center, use a brayer to squeeze out any bubbles or variances in the thickness of the adhesive. Make sure not to get any adhesive on the face of your print.

The bond will be firm enough to transport your completed piece within 15-30 minutes, but let it dry for for 24hrs before considering it "done."

Here's (http://www.artsupplywarehouse.com/prodDetail.php?id=6464) what a 16 oz bottle looks like; it's enough for about twenty 16x20" pieces.

Best of luck.

reallylongusername
14-May-2011, 11:00
Thanks! I'm going to look for this when I head into town.

Jim Becia
14-May-2011, 11:16
Note that the PMA sheet sheet doesn't remain between print and backing, you press it down and peel it off to leave a residue of adhesive. I'm just getting started with PMA myself, but I'm assuming you can overlap the sheets when applying, and when they're peeled off the residual adhesive will be even, because the overlapping adhesive will be stuck to the back of the other sheet leaving no seam or an inconsequential microscopic seam.

That's what I'm assuming, anyone with more experience comment care to comment?

...Mike

Mike,

I do not overlap the PMA, just line it up with the other sheet. If you leave the release paper on the first section, it should be easy enough to line the second piece up with it so there is no overlap. Jim

vinny
14-May-2011, 11:28
A bit pricey for large (3'x4') prints. I worries me that I may see a seam since this stuff is only 16" wide.

Google my friend, google. There are other companies that make similar products and if the pma comes in 24" widths, it maymbe available even wider.
I didn't think there's anything cheap about mural sized prints.
Cheap, fast, good. You can have only two.

Mike Anderson
14-May-2011, 12:28
Mike,

I do not overlap the PMA, just line it up with the other sheet. If you leave the release paper on the first section, it should be easy enough to line the second piece up with it so there is no overlap. Jim

Thanks!

...Mike

reallylongusername
14-May-2011, 21:33
Google my friend, google. There are other companies that make similar products and if the pma comes in 24" widths, it maymbe available even wider.
I didn't think there's anything cheap about mural sized prints.
Cheap, fast, good. You can have only two.

I was doing it cheap, fast and good till the paper was switched.

Kirk Gittings
14-May-2011, 22:20
I've had good luck with the PMA over the years with commercial prints even when the print is larger than 16". I is pretty fool proof EXCEPT for mat surface ink prints where the pressure puts an uneven sheen on the mat surface.