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Brad Rippe
10-May-2011, 13:40
I've probably got about 60 sheets of Fuji Acros in quickload left, and when this is gone, it will be gone. I'm wondering what all of you who backpack with a 4 by 5 are going to use?
Quikloads really made backpacking with a view camera practical, or I should say a "little bit" more practical.
I really hate loading film in a tent, too much dust and extra weight.
Has anyone tried to reload film into the quick load sleeves with any success?

Thanks,
-Brad

Drew Wiley
10-May-2011, 13:57
I don't think there's any realistic way to reload those things. A film tent isn't hard to use with a tiny bit of practice. I have a Harrison "Pup" tent for 4x5, and a bigger model
for 8X10 use. Weight gain shouldn't be significant if you use these things with a bit of
forethought, unless one happens to be a machine-gunner type who shoots at just
anything all day long. Maybe only two pounds more if you take half a dozen conventional filmholders, the tent, and some change-out boxes. For shorter trips, I just
take loaded filmholders only, and only take shots good enough to actually print (at least that's the game plan). You could also try to acquire some lighter weight Mido
compact holders, but I've found them to be a bit unpredictable for light leaks. I too will miss the Readyload/Quickload convenience option, especially since I'm nearly retirement age and hope to still do plenty of LF backpacking in the coming years. It
has made me review the balance of my equipment and in some cases purchase newer
lighter camping gear in general, at least for those outings where extreme weather isn't
anticipated.

Drew Wiley
10-May-2011, 13:58
PS - There are some older threads where I've described how to work with a film tent
in the field completely dust free.

Kirk Gittings
10-May-2011, 16:51
I'm afraid between my decrepit knees and running out of readyloads soon, I will be very limited in the near future.

Peter York
10-May-2011, 17:07
For me, its 2-3 grafmatics, a changing bag and a couple of trash bags. The trash bag goes inside the changing bag to protect the film from dust and is replaced every so often.

Eric Leppanen
10-May-2011, 18:09
It may be possible to obtain additional Acros Quickloads if you don't mind paying a 3.5x premium versus conventional sheets:

http://www.japanexposures.com/shop/product_info.php?cPath=27&products_id=65

Rayt
10-May-2011, 19:08
There were times when the scene is not ideal but I take the shot anyway because I have travelled a long way to get there. I can't do that anymore if I only have 5 holders with me.

Frank Petronio
10-May-2011, 19:13
Use color neg and get good enough to only need to shoot one sheet of each scene....

Roll film backs, especially the 6x12 format one, may be another option.

Jim Fitzgerald
10-May-2011, 21:14
Up the work outs!

Bill Burk
10-May-2011, 21:34
I also go with Grafmatics. They weigh a pound each so I really only plan for one. For all the trouble I go to to reduce my pack weight it kills me to add a pound, but at the last minute I usually throw the 2nd one in the pack. 6 extra septums (2 oz) and a changing bag (9 1/2 oz). At the end of the day I unload both, sorting the exposed shots into boxes by N-number (2 1/2 oz each box).

Frank Petronio
10-May-2011, 21:39
I think a Grafmatic pretty much weighs the same as three holders but it is only as thick as two holders.

Brad Rippe
12-May-2011, 11:26
Thanks everyone for the replies. One of the most frustrating backpacking requirements is to carry a bear-proof canister, a plastic 2-1/2 pound box that bears can't get into and eat your food supply. Thus, the Ursack was invented, a fabric bag that is made of space-age materials, and weighs a fraction of the bear boxes. Unfortunately, Yosemite doesn't allow them because of previous failures in their testing with live bears. (all of the approved bear canisters have failed at some point as well) The creator of the Ursack is involved with trying to sue the agency, and have them test new versions that seem to have solved the problem. Hopefully he will prevail, and we can carry more view camera equipment higher into the high country, without the dead weight of a bear-box.
In the meantime, I am going to try to reload quickloads....
Wish me more than luck.
-Brad

tgtaylor
12-May-2011, 11:33
You will need more that luck carrying quickloads: Waaaay too bulky and weighty for me. Pick up a 100 sheet box of sheet film and a Harrison Pup Ten in one hand and 2 boxes (40 sheets) of QL' in the other.

Thomas

NicolasArg
12-May-2011, 12:50
During my recent treks I carried 5 holders and 4 boxes of film. Fresh Slide/BW and exposed Slide/BW. Didn't use any tent, just reloaded the holders in a trash bag inside my sleeping bag at night. Didn't observe any additional dust.

Drew Wiley
12-May-2011, 13:23
Brad - Ursack is now OK for everywhere except where anal rangers are patrolling Yos
Park per se, or for Rae Lks and maybe Dusy Basin. Even in the Yos backcountry, I wouldn't worry too much about it, and thru-hikers are approved everywhere on the
Muir Trail per se. There's so, so much more high country to see in the Sierra that I just
avoid the handfdul of ranger-bear-giardia-plagued touristy spots. Out of hundreds of
backpack trips in the high Sierra, I've never had a single bear incident, though one is
always hypothetically possible. Bears are obviously an issue in Yos Valley, above Hetchy, and in the Tuolumne Mdw area; but huge sections of Yos backcounty are a
non-issue unless you do happen to run into some young jerk ranger trying to make a
name for himself. I use the Ursack more for rodent issues than Bears per se; but it
does make me compliant everywhere else in the Sierra if the question arises. When I've
entereed Yos park from wilderness areas outside the actual boundaries, the permits
have never involved hard-sided bear containers. But there are some rather idiotic new
rules hypothetically in force south of Mammoth, like packing out your TP rather than
burning or burying it, which are probably universally ignored.

Drew Wiley
12-May-2011, 14:03
That trick Nicolas mentions would take a bit of courage. I routinely line my film tent with a thin disposable traschcan liner, and also wash out and save those thick black
poly bags that film and paper are often packed in. But working in a down sleeping bag,
wearing a down jacket would seem iffy. Besides, once the sun goes down it tends to get real cold up high and I'm in the bag myself! I remember watching some of AA's prints from his old time slpg bag negs getting retouched - that was a miserable job for some pathetic assistant! The Harrison pup tent only weighs a couple lbs, but I guess
I could experiment in the meantime using some outdated film. I'm saving up my last
Quickloads for one of the longer trips. Right now I'm going nuts wishing the high country would thaw, but there's so much snow this year the ski resorts will probably
be open in July! I'm starting to inquire out of state, where the snow pack is more normal.

NicolasArg
13-May-2011, 10:49
That trick Nicolas mentions would take a bit of courage. I routinely line my film tent with a thin disposable traschcan liner, and also wash out and save those thick black
poly bags that film and paper are often packed in. But working in a down sleeping bag,
wearing a down jacket would seem iffy. Besides, once the sun goes down it tends to get real cold up high and I'm in the bag myself! I remember watching some of AA's prints from his old time slpg bag negs getting retouched - that was a miserable job for some pathetic assistant! The Harrison pup tent only weighs a couple lbs, but I guess
I could experiment in the meantime using some outdated film. I'm saving up my last
Quickloads for one of the longer trips. Right now I'm going nuts wishing the high country would thaw, but there's so much snow this year the ski resorts will probably
be open in July! I'm starting to inquire out of state, where the snow pack is more normal.

Well, actually, it was quite a surprise for me to find out my slides and negs were clean. I didn't have a changing tent at the time I first tried it so just had to improvise.
I'd not recommend it as a general method to anyone, except the few ultralight fans.

Drew Wiley
13-May-2011, 11:27
It is an interesting idea, however, Nicolas ... a heavy black poly bag (like a recycled
light proof print paper bag), and a disposable thin one to keep the inner clean ... a
couple of punched arm holes, and maybe no need of a risky sleeping bag at all at nite.
Think of it as a one-trip use changing tent. I'm tempted to pick up a couple of ultralite
carbon fiber sticks at the plastic shop to replicate the basic tent dome effect a Harrison has. Won't cost much just to experiment.

NicolasArg
13-May-2011, 11:43
It is an interesting idea, however, Nicolas ... a heavy black poly bag (like a recycled
light proof print paper bag), and a disposable thin one to keep the inner clean ... a
couple of punched arm holes, and maybe no need of a risky sleeping bag at all at nite.
Think of it as a one-trip use changing tent. I'm tempted to pick up a couple of ultralite
carbon fiber sticks at the plastic shop to replicate the basic tent dome effect a Harrison has. Won't cost much just to experiment.

Several months ago I bought a square meter of a light block out fabric. I tested and it's light tight. Perhaps an ultralight tent could be made of this and the fiber sticks you mention Drew. And it even comes in different colors.

Doremus Scudder
14-May-2011, 04:32
Mido holders are still available used. They are very much like Readyloads/Quickloads and are designed to be reloadable. There are some issues with them (light leaks and difficult to load) which are solvable. Do a search for more info.

I carry Mido I holders when backpacking.

Best,

Doremus Scudder

Fishjump
14-May-2011, 10:13
Mido holders

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?t=19771

Drew Wiley
14-May-2011, 11:10
Nothing like coming back from a strenuous mountain trip and finding that once in a
lifetime opportunity on a particular topographic feature with a light leak across the
negative. It was a common risk with the older double-sided Kodak Readyloads, but
happens to a lesser extent with Mido holders too. I don't find them a direct substitute for the Quickload/Readyload concept at all. They're fairly scarce anyway.
Just the poles and stuff sack for my Harrison film tent weight half a pound, and nearly all of that can be erased with simple carbon fiber sticks and a simple plastic outer bag. But let's keep coming up with ideas! This problem isn't going away.