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elycerose
4-May-2011, 15:49
Please forgive me if this has been asked before ~ I tried searching but didn't find an answer. And please forgive me if this is a silly question.

I normally develop my medium format in Rodinal at 1 to 50, according to the massive dev. chart.

I just ordered a Jobo 2523 tank and a 2509 reel.

I'm wondering if I use the same ratio/time for 4x5?

Michael Graves
4-May-2011, 16:19
Everything you ever wanted to know about developing film. Plus a lot you didn't want to know.
http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php

peter schrager
4-May-2011, 16:30
I do rodinal 1:100@10:20 minutes on a rotary base...at 75 degrees
makes a grade 3 negatives that prints like butter
Best, Peter

36cm2
4-May-2011, 16:59
I also ask forgiveness, as I know this has been addresssed before, but may I ask do people find that rodinal is worth using on a rotary base notwithstanding the loss of the accutance and (at high dilution) compensation benefits that I understand you only get through inversion or stand development? I've often thought about rodinal+rotary, but have always shied away on these grounds. I'd be interested in hearing about your motivations/results.
Thanks,
Leo

elycerose
4-May-2011, 18:09
To further ingrain my ignorance ~ what is a rotary base?

sultanofcognac
5-May-2011, 05:40
Everything you ever wanted to know about developing film. Plus a lot you didn't want to know.
http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php

I believe he'd just mentioned that!

I normally develop my medium format in Rodinal at 1 to 50, according to the massive dev. chart.

36cm2
5-May-2011, 17:10
A rotary base is a machine that constantly rotates your developer tank so that you son't have to invert it manually. You mentioned that you bought a Jobo tank. While Jobo also made normal tanks, they're most well known for their rotary processing units.

Benefits of rotary processing include convenience (you don't have to mess with it each minute or so like inversion) and consistency. Some potential disadvantages are that because the developer is always moving in rotary development, you don't get the benefits of local developer exhaustion that leads to high accutance (edge effects). Inversion development and stand development with Rodinal are particularly useful methods for achieving a high accutance look. I've heard conflicting reports on whether you can get the same results with Rodinal and rotary. Don't have time to test it, unfortunately. Waking up a 5 a.m. just to get some developing and printing in before work these days. Hope this helps.

36cm2
5-May-2011, 17:20
And to answer you're original question, in my experience your time should be very similar if you're using the same technique as with smaller formats. The only thing to worry about with Rodinal is that you have the minimum required amount of Rodinal in your dilution to develop the amount of sheets you're processing. At 1:50 I doubt that's a problem, but google Rodinal and you'Ll find pages that discuss the minimum amounts and you can calculate that against the number of sheets you're processing.

If you end up using rotary, then most recommend reducing your time by 15% and judging from there. Some say that a 5 minute water bath before developing makes that reduction unecessary. The only way to know what works for you is to try.

Good luck.

elycerose
5-May-2011, 17:33
Thanks so much for the help!

peter schrager
7-May-2011, 11:30
I have not had success with rodinal and acros semi-stand; others may differ in their experience..
Best, Peter

Lynn Jones
9-May-2011, 11:30
It works just fine, ASA/ISO 100, Rodinal 1:50, 68F 8.5min, 70F 8min, 72F 7min, 75F 6.5min. Initial agitation 15 sec, in this case agitate for 5 sec each 60seconds.

Lynn

elycerose
9-May-2011, 23:17
I just developed two negatives of HP5 and at least something turned out! So very excited. I did 1:50 for 11 minutes. Waiting for them to dry....

Brian Legge
10-May-2011, 02:08
I go with Rodinal 1:50, 68f, 12 minutes, 8 slow inversions followed by two slow inversions per minute.

Granted, that as my first attempt with the film but I have no complaints and would do the same thing again.

6x6 sample shot here for:
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4103/5016808138_0b6e351964_z.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cannelbrae/5016808138/