PDA

View Full Version : Ctein's Post Exposure - Free PDF Download!



cdholden
28-Apr-2011, 21:37
One of my friends sent me this link today... free download of the 2nd edition of this sold out book:

http://ctein.com/booksmpl.htm

Enjoy!
Chris

Leigh
28-Apr-2011, 21:51
Awesome. Great addition to the library.

- Leigh

Mark Woods
29-Apr-2011, 00:30
Thank You Chris!!!!!!!!!!!!!

neil poulsen
29-Apr-2011, 01:48
Very neat.

RickV
29-Apr-2011, 03:11
Thanks for the link, Chris. Great book.

Pawlowski6132
29-Apr-2011, 07:53
I've found it difficult to find anything in this book of practical value. What do you guys like about it. Maybe it's time I re-read it.

SocalAstro
29-Apr-2011, 08:55
One of my friends sent me this link today... free download of the 2nd edition of this sold out book:

http://ctein.com/booksmpl.htm

Enjoy!
Chris

Thanks for posting this :-)

Peter J. De Smidt
29-Apr-2011, 09:49
Right before publication, the publisher put what they thought was a sample chapter up on their site. It turned out to be a pretty generous sample, as it was the entire book in pdf.

cowanw
29-Apr-2011, 09:54
I've found it difficult to find anything in this book of practical value. What do you guys like about it. Maybe it's time I re-read it.

I just took advantage of the offer and printed the entire book and read it at leisure: I tend to agree. It is a bit out of date from a material point of view. Perhaps it is the type of book that inspires you to go deeper into an area. But alas I was underwhelmed as well.

Brian Ellis
29-Apr-2011, 13:12
I've found it difficult to find anything in this book of practical value. What do you guys like about it. Maybe it's time I re-read it.

If you still print in a darkroom Chapter 4, titled "How Print Materials See," is very useful IMHO as is Chapter 10, "Special Concerns of Variable Contrast Paper Users."

Oren Grad
29-Apr-2011, 13:54
"Post Exposure" wasn't written as a general textbook of analog darkroom work. It's more a series of special topics, reflecting Ctein's interests and drawing especially on his own experience and testing. In this way it's somewhat analogous to Richard Henry's "Controls in Black and White Photography", though "Post Exposure" is broader, more polished and less concerned specifically with debunking esoteric bits of bogus folk wisdom. Some parts will be familiar to readers who have been following Ctein's articles in various publications over the last 30-odd years; the discussions on enlarging lenses and on RC print permanence, for example, made quite a splash in their original incarnations, in Darkroom Photography and in Photo Techniques, respectively.

Paul Fitzgerald
11-May-2011, 23:22
Thanks for the link, a nice trip down memory lane.

"It is a bit out of date from a material point of view. Perhaps it is the type of book that inspires you to go deeper into an area."

Yes it did, an old 'hot-rod' secret, microfiche. Microfiche comes on 4x6" diazo film with NO grain, high contrast and should be perfectly printed across the full field, perfect for checking alignment of the enlarger and coverage of the lens. It also has a specific advantage, with a grain magnifier it will INSTANTLY show longitudinal chromatic aberration, defocus one way it goes magenta, the other direction goes cyan. The difference between lenses is suprising.

The degree of LCA differs by lens and f/stop so it's not the microfiche. I guess you could get the same effect with chrome on glass but I don't wish to spend the money for that. Yes, you can still buy microfiche films at eBay Motors, about $1 USD each.



""Longitudinal chromatic aberration is the
biggest residual color aberration in most enlarg-
ing lenses. The lens focuses different colors of
light at slightly different distances from the lens.
Serious longitudinal chromatic aberration
degrades both contrast and sharpness and can
cause focusing problems when one prints with
some papers (see the next section). Although
almost no top-notch enlarger lenses showed
significant lateral color when used within its nor-
mal magnification range, almost all showed
longitudinal color. In fact, apo lenses suffered as
badly from longitudinal color as non-apo ones.""