PDA

View Full Version : Efke: love it but one major complaint...



David Aimone
10-Apr-2011, 14:35
:(
I am SO careful when I load 4x5" sheets of Efke film into my film holders to make sure that the little sheet of paper dividing the film isn't loaded with the film. So careful...

Yet, I just unloaded 4 film holders that I shot, and 2 of the 8 sheets had the paper attached with the film!!!!!!

Anyone have a simple solution to this problem? I feel pretty stupid after being sure there was no paper going in to the film holders.
:eek:

Louie Powell
10-Apr-2011, 14:54
Dave -

Been there, done that - many times.

There are two solutions. One is to use a film that doesn't come with interleaving sheets. It's been a long time since I used expensive film, but I seem to recall that Ilford doesn't use paper.

The other solution is to simply be careful to always make sure that you remove a sheet of paper for each sheet of film that you put into a holder. Create a rhythm - take the sheet of film out of the package, feel for paper on both sides, and set it aside. If you don't find a sheet of paper, then double check to make sure that you haven't missed it.

Part of the problem is that the interleaving sheets are cut at the same time that the film is cut, so there is a tendency for the paper to stick to the edge of the film. Rubbing the end of your finger across the edge of the film helps dislodge the paper.

David Aimone
10-Apr-2011, 14:56
Thanks, Louie. The second solution you mention is the one that I've been doing. I guess I'll have to be even more vigilant. Don't want to get too rough with the film though.

I've become very fond of this film, so I'd rather not switch!


Dave -
The other solution is to simply be careful to always make sure that you remove a sheet of paper for each sheet of film that you put into a holder. Create a rhythm - take the sheet of film out of the package, feel for paper on both sides, and set it aside. If you don't find a sheet of paper, then double check to make sure that you haven't missed it.

Part of the problem is that the interleaving sheets are cut at the same time that the film is cut, so there is a tendency for the paper to stick to the edge of the film. Rubbing the end of your finger across the edge of the film helps dislodge the paper.

vinny
10-Apr-2011, 15:21
Flip the film over (emulsion side down) and pull off the paper first. Hopefully you've got film with notches or his could get confusing. More than once i've had efke 25 w/o notches. Sometimes 1/2 way thru the box.

David Aimone
10-Apr-2011, 16:39
Well, I guess it could be worse. The paper could be sticking to the emulsion side. Just processed the film and everything came out alright, though I wonder how a white paper behind the film affected the exposure...if it did.

Oscar MacPhoton
10-Apr-2011, 16:50
Well, I guess it could be worse. The paper could be sticking to the emulsion side. Just processed the film and everything came out alright, though I wonder how a white paper behind the film affected the exposure...if it did.

I'd think such paper would cause additional halation effects but depending on the subject matter it may not be noticeable.

I love the EFKE films too but my major gripes are that they will reticulate if you even look at them funny, and they are sensitive to pinholing- no big deal for me since I use a water stop bath.

IanMazursky
10-Apr-2011, 17:43
Ilford used to ship their film with interleaving sheets. I still have a few old boxes of HP5 with it.
It occasionally sticks so when im loading i run my finger across the tops of both sides.
You can feel a difference if the interleaving paper is attached. You can also breath on your finger and you can feel both sides of the film.
It will slightly catch on both sides but if the paper is present it wont. You then know if its attached.

picker77
10-Apr-2011, 18:36
One simple thing you might try is throwing a small damp (not wet) sponge in one corner of the dark tent before you close it up. I find my fingertips many times get so dry and slick that it's hard to manipulate film or thin sheets of tissue paper, and a damp sponge you can dampen your fingertips with can make a lot of difference in ease of handling film. Maybe it also helps reduce static electricity around the film holders, too.

David Aimone
10-Apr-2011, 18:39
I'll keep trying all these suggestions. The processed negatives seemed no worse for the wear.

Well, Efke is worth it. Just did the same photos in Foma100/D76 and then Efke/Pyro. What a difference...

Jim Fitzgerald
10-Apr-2011, 19:47
I'll keep trying all these suggestions. The processed negatives seemed no worse for the wear.

Well, Efke is worth it. Just did the same photos in Foma100/D76 and then Efke/Pyro. What a difference...

David, I'm curious as to the difference. Can you give us some details. Thanks.

David Aimone
10-Apr-2011, 19:56
Jim, I'll do my best when I get a chance to post some comparisons. Seems significant at first glance.

drew.saunders
10-Apr-2011, 20:13
I use Efke Infrared film, and I just count the sheets of paper after I've loaded the holders.

Roger Cole
11-Apr-2011, 01:31
I'll keep trying all these suggestions. The processed negatives seemed no worse for the wear.

Well, Efke is worth it. Just did the same photos in Foma100/D76 and then Efke/Pyro. What a difference...


David, I'm curious as to the difference. Can you give us some details. Thanks.

I'm curious too, but how can you separate the effects of different film from the effects of the pyro? Wouldn't a fair comparison need to be in the same developer?

Ash
11-Apr-2011, 03:07
When I load film that has the paper dividers I get the notched corner, run a finger over it, and flick it with my thumb. This means I can feel if there's something over the notch and makes sure nothing it attached with static. Worked so far.

rguinter
11-Apr-2011, 04:16
I use Efke Infrared film, and I just count the sheets of paper after I've loaded the holders.

For some reason I've never had this problem. I actually prefer using films with paper sheets between. The individual film sheets separate more easily with my fumbly old fingers.

But I also do the same as Drew and count the sheets of paper in my changing tent after loading.

Bob G.

David Aimone
11-Apr-2011, 09:17
Roger, you can't separate the film from the developer. I've used the different combinations, and this is probably more a subjective reaction based on my preferences.

Maybe I've just outgrown (for me) Fomapan. I bought a bunch of it when I first started LF photography, wanting to focus on one film, and I liked the photos that I saw taken with it. Then I tried Efke and really liked it in D-76, then I tried the combo in Pyro.

If I get a chance, I'll try to post what I got from the two different combinations, FWIW...

For me, I'm not looking back. But you are absolutely correct in that it isn't a fair comparison. Fomapan is well regarded and I respect that.

This all came from my own personal excitement of what I was getting from the Efke/Pyro combination. Perhaps I got a little too excited!
:o



I'm curious too, but how can you separate the effects of different film from the effects of the pyro? Wouldn't a fair comparison need to be in the same developer?

mandoman7
11-Apr-2011, 09:52
My guess is that it has something to do with the film's notable sensitivity to scratching. Making the mistake once, however, seemed to be enough for me to get the film loaded right after that.

Roger Cole
12-Apr-2011, 23:59
Roger, you can't separate the film from the developer. I've used the different combinations, and this is probably more a subjective reaction based on my preferences.

Maybe I've just outgrown (for me) Fomapan. I bought a bunch of it when I first started LF photography, wanting to focus on one film, and I liked the photos that I saw taken with it. Then I tried Efke and really liked it in D-76, then I tried the combo in Pyro.

If I get a chance, I'll try to post what I got from the two different combinations, FWIW...

For me, I'm not looking back. But you are absolutely correct in that it isn't a fair comparison. Fomapan is well regarded and I respect that.

This all came from my own personal excitement of what I was getting from the Efke/Pyro combination. Perhaps I got a little too excited!
:o

Such enthusiasm is a good thing and not to be disregarded.

I've never used Pyro. It's on my list of things to try someday. I've also never used Foma or Efke though I have some Foma: a couple rolls of 120 400 for the Yashica and a box of the Arista branded sheet film in 4x5. I haven't shot any of it yet.

tautatis
13-Apr-2011, 11:08
I love Efke & Adox. Overall, Efke/adox films with care, are excellent value in the now fast shrinking film industry.

I have not tried either in Pyro. I guess, it is time!

Adrian

Jim Fitzgerald
13-Apr-2011, 20:38
I love Efke-25 and shoot it in 8x10,11x14 and 8x20. Beautiful negatives and I develop it in Pyrocat-HD. It gives me wonderful negatives for my carbon printing. I also shoot x-ray film in 8x10, 11x14 and 14x17 and have great results with it also. I develop this in a weaker Pyrocat-HD. My Two films that give me everything I need. I've never been able to get the Foma to work for me.

Erik Larsen
13-Apr-2011, 21:08
I love Efke-25 and shoot it in 8x10,11x14 and 8x20. Beautiful negatives and I develop it in Pyrocat-HD. It gives me wonderful negatives for my carbon printing. I also shoot x-ray film in 8x10, 11x14 and 14x17 and have great results with it also. I develop this in a weaker Pyrocat-HD. My Two films that give me everything I need. I've never been able to get the Foma to work for me.

Hi Jim,

Foma was my favorite film in 11x14 for carbon - builds contrast very fast but unfortunately it isn't offered in sizes larger than 8x10 any more:( I like the efke films, but I get so much fog with pyro and jobo processing that my exposures in my pizza oven are annoyingly long. Adopting carbro as an alternative has cured some of my headaches with efke. The efke line is really nice. It has a quality I like but can't really describe in words.

regards
erik

Jay Skjonsby
29-Sep-2011, 11:07
Dave...

I have never encountered the problem you speak of because I have always been a Ilford/kodak diehard, but that may change.

Here is a suggestion that may help make things a little more obvious. When I am in the darkroom working with sheet film I always have one if not two kodak safelights lights on. They have the number 3 filters in them. They produce a real dim glow that helps me see. It takes a while for my eyes to adjust. They have helped me considerably.

I never have them pointed at my film but maybe towards the wall or the ceiling. I use the bullet shaped light with about a 5 inch filter. I have never had a problem with any fog.

If you working with ISO 25 film I am sure there wouldn't be any problems.

If someone has had different experience please chime in.

Best of Luck!

jay

David Aimone
29-Sep-2011, 12:21
Thanks, Jay,

It was mostly a newb operator error. With a little practice, I have it down so it's not an issue anymore, even in total darkness.
:)


Dave...

I have never encountered the problem you speak of because I have always been a Ilford/kodak diehard, but that may change.

Here is a suggestion that may help make things a little more obvious. When I am in the darkroom working with sheet film I always have one if not two kodak safelights lights on. They have the number 3 filters in them. They produce a real dim glow that helps me see. It takes a while for my eyes to adjust. They have helped me considerably.

I never have them pointed at my film but maybe towards the wall or the ceiling. I use the bullet shaped light with about a 5 inch filter. I have never had a problem with any fog.

If you working with ISO 25 film I am sure there wouldn't be any problems.

If someone has had different experience please chime in.

Best of Luck!

jay