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Kevin J. Kolosky
7-Apr-2011, 18:26
The literature on Kodak T-max developer states that it should not be used with large format films, but instead to use T-max RS developer.

What is the difference between the two?

Are there any nonliquid developers, either readily available for purchase or homemade that come close to the T-max developers.

J D Clark
7-Apr-2011, 23:30
Kevin,
Developing sheet film sometimes generates something called dichroic fog -- you can look up details elsewhere. T-Max RS developer is formulated specifically to prevent dichroic fog formation.

John Clark
www.johndclark.com

J D Clark
7-Apr-2011, 23:35
Kevin,
FYI, I learned about the dichroic fog from John Sexton -- here's a link to information:

http://www.largeformatphotography.info/articles/sexton-tmax.html

John Clark
www.johndclark.com

Oren Grad
8-Apr-2011, 08:31
Are there any nonliquid developers, either readily available for purchase or homemade that come close to the T-max developers.

"Come close" in what way? There are many excellent nonliquid developers. What characteristics are you looking for?

Kevin J. Kolosky
8-Apr-2011, 09:13
"come close" is misleading. I should have said "have similar formulas".

Thank you.

Drew Wiley
8-Apr-2011, 09:39
All kinds of developers work fairly well with TMax films. You just have to calibrate for
your favorite, based on the nuances you want. But strictly speaking, TMax RS dev
does not have any direct substitute, and it is capable of a slightly straighter-line
characteristic curve with TMax films than any other developer I am aware of, if this
happens to be a characteristic important to you.

Kevin J. Kolosky
8-Apr-2011, 10:20
All kinds of developers work fairly well with TMax films. You just have to calibrate for
your favorite, based on the nuances you want. But strictly speaking, TMax RS dev
does not have any direct substitute, and it is capable of a slightly straighter-line
characteristic curve with TMax films than any other developer I am aware of, if this
happens to be a characteristic important to you.

I'm happy if I can get zones 1 through 8 to show tone on an unmanipulated print using a neg that was exposed on a sunny day. :)

Drew Wiley
8-Apr-2011, 10:44
The original TMax 100 film was a bit fussy per highlt exposure, so this I believe was
the original motive for Kodak to offer a couple of dedicated developers. The current
100 TMax is more forgiving to develop, and the 400-speed film even better. For general
shooting I personally use pyro developers, and only use TMaxRS for special lab work
like color separation negatives, where a true straight line is essential. Otherwise, even
ordinary common developers like D76 or HC-110 should give you excellent results, with
more than enough room to cover Zones 1 thru 8 ++.