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crackerjax
7-Apr-2011, 07:39
To not take a chance on running out of film holders, could I put my exposed film back in the box it came in without fear of scratching it? It seems to work with roll film.

Gérard
7-Apr-2011, 07:45
There should be no problem if you don't mix up exposed and unexposed sheets.
I carry spare film boxes when I travel.

BrianShaw
7-Apr-2011, 07:53
I've never had a problem doing that. I second the recommendation made by Ge'rard to use a spare box, not the one that also has unexposed film in it. A mix up will happen faster than you can say "Jumping Jack Flash".. or "Cheese"!

Richard K.
7-Apr-2011, 08:45
That's what a lot of us do. When I went on my West trip, I DLed my film daily into 3 compartment boxes and brought them home to develop. I DO worry about scratching, so what I did was use the fold-over piece of cardboard that comes inside the (Ilford) film boxes to place the exposed sheets into, BUT, I also wound an elastic around the pack near the open edge to keep the sheets from sliding on each other. Worked just fine. And yes, do not mix exposed with unexposed! Bring empty boxes...:)

crackerjax
7-Apr-2011, 08:49
Obviously not a good idea to use an in use box. I've finally gotten enough holders to put a full box of ten sheets in use, so now I've got an extra box with me.my big problem is my local lab is unreliable on their turnaround time (though quality is top notch) so I'd rather not let them hold onto five holders for a week plus.thanks for the info!

BrianShaw
7-Apr-2011, 08:49
BUT, I also wound an elastic around the pack near the open edge to keep the sheets from sliding on each other.

I've never wound one around my film, but I always wind one around my box. After dropping a box once I learned my lesson!

SamReeves
7-Apr-2011, 09:19
Nothing wrong with throwing it back into the box before you develop it.

Greg Blank
7-Apr-2011, 09:25
I have reboxed literally 1,000's of sheets without damage. I have mixed them up in the same box-it's frustrating. I advocate like others to take separate boxes, better yet create custom labels for the boxes which designate, film type location, date, etc that can be stuck on a given box. Chance of damage is much more likely in your processing steps than the reused box. The only caveat is, if you store the box for a while prior to processing make sure the room is lesser humity or that you rewrap the film inside the foil pouch, I placed some sheets in my darkroom once and the moisture-from humidity came up through my work bench and made the sheets stick together and I have a dehumidifier that runs 24-7 in the summer months.



To not take a chance on running out of film holders, could I put my exposed film back in the box it came in without fear of scratching it? It seems to work with roll film.

Michael Kadillak
7-Apr-2011, 09:29
I through it was fine as well that is until I had some light seepage on some exposed sheets and as a result I came to this conclusion:

If you are going to bring home exposed sheet film from the field in film boxes PUT THE EXPOSED SHEET FILM IN THE HEAVY LIGHT TIGHT BLACK PLASTIC LINER BAGS before you put it in the empty film boxes and use rubber bands or tape to make sure the film boxes stay closed.

The Ilford plastic film inner liners are the best choice for this application as are the Efke/Adox liners.

I would further qualify the risks of this process by making sure that any exposed/unexposed exchange takes place in a film tent that has been evaluated from the inside with a strong flashlight under the lowest light conditions possible or a motel bathroom that is on the interior of the room without a window to the outside.

Film is expensive and making reasonable precautions to insure that you make your exposure is a one time event I feel is good advice. If you use correct format boxes usually the liners prevent excessive movement and potential emulsion scratching.

I learned my lesson.

Scott Walker
7-Apr-2011, 09:39
To not take a chance on running out of film holders, could I put my exposed film back in the box it came in without fear of scratching it? It seems to work with roll film.

The film dosen't get scratched while in the box unexposed, no reason it would once exposed if put back in the same way it came out. I have always just kept all the original packaging and used that but I also like Richards idea of the elastic band around the cardboard. Always use tape or an elastic around any unsealed box exposed or not.

Douglas Henderson
7-Apr-2011, 09:43
I've always put exposed film back into separate, empty, saved boxes of film. My most recent problem has been not having any extra 5x7 boxes and so exposed film has been stored in the film holders in plastic bags in the fridge. Because there has been a hiatus in B&W photography since mothballing the darkroom and playing with digital, these 5x7 shots have been in holders in the fridge some 4+ years now.

When I shot 4x5 copywork for E-6 developing, I thought nothing of storing exposed film in empty boxes, just loose without any protective paper sheets or dark paper/plastic envelopes for the milk run to Bozeman. Never experienced any scratched film or light leaks. The only caution I was advised of was not to store more than 20 or so in a box at once, otherwise the weight of the sheets might produce friction enough to start scratching the loose film.

I took my 4x5 gear to the Sierras years ago and the routine was to load with a little Harrison tent (the early model with the collapsing umbrella post) and unload film into spare boxes--in this case, I placed film between the stiff paper sheets and placed in plastic envelopes. Spent two weeks wandering through the sequioa groves above the south fork of the Kaweah River--and all the film got home intact.

rguinter
7-Apr-2011, 10:45
That's what a lot of us do. When I went on my West trip, I DLed my film daily into 3 compartment boxes and brought them home to develop. I DO worry about scratching, so what I did was use the fold-over piece of cardboard that comes inside the (Ilford) film boxes to place the exposed sheets into, BUT, I also wound an elastic around the pack near the open edge to keep the sheets from sliding on each other. Worked just fine. And yes, do not mix exposed with unexposed! Bring empty boxes...:)

This method that Richard mentions with the cardboard end-boards and elastic band is what I use.

You can also place this pack back in the same box with unexposed film. With the rubber band segregating the exposed sheets between the end-boards there will be no question in the dark room or inside the changing tent which is which.

Bob G.