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Professional
21-Feb-2011, 10:49
And put 1 million lines under big "BUT", i failed in something, a big big stupid mistake, i feel ashamed to have that big silly mistake at the beginning, no wonder why i have one sheet as blank nothing there, and here is the second sheet result:

http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/4532/img140ni.jpg

So this is officially my first LF shot, don't know what i have to do, so that i asked about processing LF sheets, i don't want to waste money for the lab for failed bad mistake[user: me], your comments???

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 10:50
I don't have something to post as my first ever LF shot.

Brian C. Miller
21-Feb-2011, 11:01
Hey, relax! You have both of your shots here, just on one piece of film. This happens to all of us, and is a very easy mistake to make. Some guys are really good with double exposures like this, and make marvelous compositions. I think I made this mistake myself last month. Another mistake is using a rangefinder and forgetting to take off the lens cap.

(Somebody posted a "mistake" where he exposed the same negative three times.)

Filmnut
21-Feb-2011, 11:10
I've done this too! Your shot has a neat look to it though! That is one of issues we all have to deal with when doing LF work, there are no interlocks to stop you making dumb mistakes. I'm sure you'll do better next time!
Keith

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 11:27
Hey, relax! You have both of your shots here, just on one piece of film. This happens to all of us, and is a very easy mistake to make. Some guys are really good with double exposures like this, and make marvelous compositions. I think I made this mistake myself last month. Another mistake is using a rangefinder and forgetting to take off the lens cap.

(Somebody posted a "mistake" where he exposed the same negative three times.)


I've done this too! Your shot has a neat look to it though! That is one of issues we all have to deal with when doing LF work, there are no interlocks to stop you making dumb mistakes. I'm sure you'll do better next time!
Keith


Hahaha, somehow i feel happy to get something, looking at both shots i think the exposure is not that much bad, maybe a bit over for one shot and a bit under for the another, i was so close, but really i can't understand how that mistake happened, sounds even with all careful steps i still did a mistake, so with B&W i doubled or merged exposures [multi], and with color one sheet with black "frame or border" on top.

I hope i will not do more mistakes, no time to waste films and money on mistakes.

Chris Strobel
21-Feb-2011, 11:38
Thats actually a very interesting shot.Me likes :)

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 12:05
Thats actually a very interesting shot.Me likes :)

What next, shoot more or stop here to learn from mistakes?!!!

Ash
21-Feb-2011, 12:15
Make sure you mark the holder once you have taken a shot (either by flipping the darkslide or by making a pencil mark) then you know not to do it again.

When two images are exposed you've essentially doubled the exposure time. Don't worry about exposure values on a double exposure until you know what you're like on a single shot per film.

Chris Strobel
21-Feb-2011, 12:41
What next, shoot more or stop here to learn from mistakes?!!!

Lol! Well if double exposure is your thing your off to a great start :) There are quite a few steps in the LF camera process, and mistakes happen to us all.You'll sorta get a rhythm down as you progress, so just keep shooting, and log down your mistakes so you can avoid them.My biggest mistake when starting off with 8x10 was chopping off half the image with my compendum lens shade.Didn't see it when focusing wide open.With 8x10 it can get expensive screwing up, so its always check and check again.I assume those with OCD probably make the least mistakes with a view camera lol :D Shoot on!

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 13:01
OK, i can't wait to start or shoot seriously again, i feel i want to shoot NOW to correct my mistakes and see my new attempts, but i want to know how to process my own B&W films so i don't need to use the lab all the time and spend more for it.

Robert Hughes
21-Feb-2011, 13:09
Yep, that happens - we've all done that double exposure thing. Keep shooting, and mind those silver/black sheet holder slides.

Tony Evans
21-Feb-2011, 13:13
Take a look at this.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/largeformat/discuss/72157594305554218/

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 13:31
Yep, that happens - we've all done that double exposure thing. Keep shooting, and mind those silver/black sheet holder slides.

This is making me happy to know that i am not alone, and i was sure i will do something wrong, didn't realize i did until i saw the results, but i am happy that i've got a shot, it is not difficult as i tought, need more shooting and practice and it will be easy to shoot as usual with my other formats, time and patience.


Take a look at this.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/largeformat/discuss/72157594305554218/

Pity, my country blocked the groups in Flicker and kept flicker with photos open, really crazy stupid move, so i have to access blocked filter by some ways now to watch or read that Flicker discussion.

cosmicexplosion
21-Feb-2011, 15:41
great stuff keep going with the double exposure!

you are off to a great start

B>E creative

Professional
21-Feb-2011, 16:32
hehehe, this mistake became a good creative start now, i am so lucky!!!

Well, i will keep shooting when it is possible, too bad i want to get another lens to shoot outdoor but i think i should be patient with 150mm, but i am worry about developing now.

h2oman
21-Feb-2011, 17:39
It's far more interesting than the ones I've gotten that are entirely black or entirely white!

Paul Bujak
21-Feb-2011, 18:04
It's good that you want to develop your own B&W negatives. You can learn and correct your own mistakes but may not be able to do the same for a lab. I started developing B&W in 1971 when I got some 35mm negatives back with all kinds of dirt embedded in the emulsion. I figured I could do at least as well and have never looked back. I do all my own E-6 and C-41, too.

It was was easy to do small and medium format rolls and then move up to large format. I think the most difficult part is drying the film without getting dust and dirt on the sheet. I hang them in the shower with the curtain closed and of course, the water off.:p

Good luck with your learning. Keep posting your pictures. You live in an interesting place.

Paul

Merg Ross
21-Feb-2011, 18:36
Perhaps a mistake, and not what you had in mind. However, I think it is a really interesting composition! Keep at it, and do not be discouraged.

Remember, the darkslides are silver and black for a reason; silver, unexposed film; black, exposed film (or use your own method).

Professional
22-Feb-2011, 04:45
It's far more interesting than the ones I've gotten that are entirely black or entirely white!

I agree.


It's good that you want to develop your own B&W negatives. You can learn and correct your own mistakes but may not be able to do the same for a lab. I started developing B&W in 1971 when I got some 35mm negatives back with all kinds of dirt embedded in the emulsion. I figured I could do at least as well and have never looked back. I do all my own E-6 and C-41, too.

It was was easy to do small and medium format rolls and then move up to large format. I think the most difficult part is drying the film without getting dust and dirt on the sheet. I hang them in the shower with the curtain closed and of course, the water off.:p

Good luck with your learning. Keep posting your pictures. You live in an interesting place.

Paul

I will, thank you very much Paul.


Perhaps a mistake, and not what you had in mind. However, I think it is a really interesting composition! Keep at it, and do not be discouraged.

Remember, the darkslides are silver and black for a reason; silver, unexposed film; black, exposed film (or use your own method).

My darkslide is white and black, no silver unless i can get that kind of darkslide.