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Gem Singer
23-Jun-2010, 11:27
We are constantly being reminded that the USA is experiencing difficult economic times. That's not hard to believe.

A mural sized print from the bankrupt Polaroid Corp. collection was sold at a Sotheby's auction for $722,500 two days ago .

It was a large B&W print of Ansel Adams' "Clearing Winter Storm" that he printed it in the late 1960's, or early 1970's.

Sotheby's didn't disclose the name of the winning bidder, but you can bet he/she wasn't a USA citizen.

Did you feel the earth shake? It was Ansel turning over in his grave.

Jim C.
23-Jun-2010, 11:50
One has to remember that anyone who can afford to drop $ 722,500.00 will most
likely not be affected by any economic downturn, regardless if their nationality.

Darin Boville
23-Jun-2010, 12:27
A bunch of these murals-sized ones sold. all at high prices. I wonder if the same buyer bought them all?

--Darin

Eric Leppanen
23-Jun-2010, 13:13
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Records-abound-at-NYC-apf-3720854537.html?x=0

goamules
23-Jun-2010, 15:46
I don't think the ultra wealthy in the US are out of the running. And my recent trip to England, France, and Ireland didn't detect a growing class of ultra wealthy Europeans either. Remember when Japan was buying up all the american iconic "stuff" back in the 80s? They aren't any more. Good times come and go for all. For Polaroid and the artists who donated their work to them, it's the last, sad goodby. Ansel would be upset about that, not about who was buying his work.

Bruce Watson
23-Jun-2010, 15:54
A mural sized print...

Anyone know the dimensions of said "mural sized" print might be? Just curious. I've seen it in 20x16 inches and it's pretty grainy.

ic-racer
23-Jun-2010, 15:57
A high price for a large AA photograph. That makes sense to me. I have a lot of admiration for AA.

Now, a high price for a picture of a picture of a cowboy...that seems crazy....

Greg Blank
23-Jun-2010, 16:30
There is a good side, that is whomever purchased the image has an appreciation of photography. Likely they will take good care of it. The sad part is that the money spent on art in general could easily feed many homeless, or poor in: "name the country" for months and perhaps years. Then again in general wealthy people at east some do contribute to charity in ways the general public and even riff raff one step up from the gutter don't and won't.

"Priorities"



We are constantly being reminded that the USA is experiencing difficult economic times. That's not hard to believe.

A mural sized print from the bankrupt Polaroid Corp. collection was sold at a Sotheby's auction for $722,500 two days ago .

It was a large B&W print of Ansel Adams' "Clearing Winter Storm" that he printed it in the late 1960's, or early 1970's.

Sotheby's didn't disclose the name of the winning bidder, but you can bet he/she wasn't a USA citizen.

Did you feel the earth shake? It was Ansel turning over in his grave.

Darin Boville
23-Jun-2010, 16:31
Someone on another thread (Gem?) said they were 40x50 inches.

I wonder also if this print was pre-fire damage or post fire damage? That might also be a factor in the price, although i suspect the large size is really the key.

--Darin

Brian Ellis
23-Jun-2010, 16:49
Someone on another thread (Gem?) said they were 40x50 inches.

I wonder also if this print was pre-fire damage or post fire damage? That might also be a factor in the price, although i suspect the large size is really the key.

--Darin

I believe the fire was in 1937. The Polaroid process wasn't around until 1948 or so.

The key is the combination of the photographer's name and the fact that it's an iconic Adams photograph in a unique size.

Darin Boville
23-Jun-2010, 16:53
The fire was in 1937. The Polaroid process wasn't around until 1948 or so.

The key is the name of the photographer.

Re-reading the OP I see that Gem says the print was printed in the 60s or 70s, so that answers that question. Post-fire.

Not quite sure what you mean about the Polaroid process...

--Darin

Gem Singer
23-Jun-2010, 17:08
When I stated that Ansel would be rolling over in his grave, I wasn't referring to who purchased the print or in which country it will end up. Ansel didn't give a care.

However, he couldn't get that kind of price for his prints when he was alive. His disappointment would stem from the fact that he is no longer here to reap the fruits of his labor.

My guess is that Ansel's "Clearing Winter Storm" mural will be used to decorate a wall, in a brand new office building, somewhere in the United Arab Emirates.

Brian Ellis
23-Jun-2010, 17:26
When I stated that Ansel would be rolling over in his grave, I wasn't referring to who purchased the print or in which country it will end up. Ansel didn't give a care.

However, he couldn't get that kind of price for his prints when he was alive. His disappointment would stem from the fact that he is no longer here to reap the fruits of his labor.

My guess is that Ansel's "Clearing Winter Storm" mural will be used to decorate a wall, in a brand new office building, somewhere in the United Arab Emirates.

I imagine that he'd rather be here than there for a lot of reasons besides the price of his prints. : - )

But let's not shed too many tears for Ansel. Between the prices he was getting for his prints and his income from other sources (e.g. licensing his images for use on various products) he lived very well in his later years from all I've read.

Brian Ellis
23-Jun-2010, 17:32
Re-reading the OP I see that Gem says the print was printed in the 60s or 70s, so that answers that question. Post-fire.

Not quite sure what you mean about the Polaroid process...

--Darin

By "the Polaroid process" I meant the process invented by Dr. Land that allowed one to make instant prints - Polaroid cameras, Polaroid film, etc.

Mike Anderson
23-Jun-2010, 19:05
...he couldn't get that kind of price for his prints when he was alive.


The price of art always goes up when the artist dies, doesn't it? (I could make this into a crass joke, but I'm too mature for that:) )

...Mike

Darin Boville
23-Jun-2010, 19:35
By "the Polaroid process" I meant the process invented by Dr. Land that allowed one to make instant prints - Polaroid cameras, Polaroid film, etc.

Uhhh...I guess I already knew that :)

The part I missed was when you said "I believe the fire was in 1937. The Polaroid process wasn't around until 1948 or so" in response to my wondering whether the print was pre or post fire. Where does the date of the invention of the Polaroid process fit in?

--Darin

patrickjames
23-Jun-2010, 22:36
Those mural prints were regular, not Polaroid, prints. The Polaroid collection had many regular prints in it. The sad part of this auction is that no benefit will go to the artists even though for the most part the artists had an agreement with Polaroid that the work remained theirs so Polaroid didn't own it.

A.D.Coleman has written extensively on his blog about this situation. I believe his blog is called aphotocritic if you want to look it up.

sun of sand
24-Jun-2010, 06:55
I did feel the earth shake yesterday actually
being a saint must give you some real pull

Arne Croell
24-Jun-2010, 07:59
A.D.Coleman has written extensively on his blog about this situation. I believe his blog is called aphotocritic if you want to look it up.

http://nearbycafe.com/artandphoto/photocritic/

Brian Ellis
24-Jun-2010, 08:41
Uhhh...I guess I already knew that :)

The part I missed was when you said "I believe the fire was in 1937. The Polaroid process wasn't around until 1948 or so" in response to my wondering whether the print was pre or post fire. Where does the date of the invention of the Polaroid process fit in?

--Darin

I figured you must have known that but I couldn't think of anything else to say when you asked what I meant about the Polaroid process. Now I see you were asking why the date of its invention was relevant to your original question.

I thought it was relevant because the print was a mural print and I assumed a mural print would have been a Polaroid print. However, after reading the article cited earlier in this thread I see that it wasn't, it was a silver print from the Polaroid collection but not a Polaroid print. So the date of invention of the Polaroid process is irrelevant to your original question. Sorry for the confusion.