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Jay Decker
20-Feb-2010, 14:49
Have a 8x10 Kodak 2-D this is missing a knob on the front rise and fall control. Do you know where I can find one or who would make one for me?

Here are some photos:


http://www.monkeytumble.com/tmp/DSC_0203.jpg


http://www.monkeytumble.com/tmp/DSC_0060.jpg


http://www.monkeytumble.com/tmp/DSC_0062.jpg


http://www.monkeytumble.com/tmp/DSC_0058.jpg

Richard Wasserman
20-Feb-2010, 14:56
Richard Ritter?

Jim C.
20-Feb-2010, 16:25
If you're interested I could make you one, I had to reproduce the entire front rise
mechanism for my 5X7 2D restoration.

Jeffrey Sipress
20-Feb-2010, 16:39
Any local machine shop.

Gordon Moat
20-Feb-2010, 18:01
Any local machine shop.

Rates for machine shop work are quite high at times. Those could easily become $50 to $100 knobs.

Jim Ewins
20-Feb-2010, 20:20
Like Jim C, I could make you one. Either send me one to copy or provide a good engineering sketch. I machine brass & aluminum and some mild steel. It like LF is a hobby but unlike LF I'm good at it. Anyone want to buy a Wisner 4x5 pocket expedition?

Jim Ewins

Wayne R. Scott
21-Feb-2010, 07:54
Jay,

If you find some one to make you one, have them make two. I need the exact same knob on my 2D.

Wayne

Jeffrey Sipress
21-Feb-2010, 10:05
Gordon, you are correct. $50 to 100 is very low for custom machining of any kind. My shop rate is $85/95 per hour. My overhead is about $65 an hour. I usually do camera work for friends or LF Forum members at $50 an hour, or less, but I am performing that work myself and happy to be helping someone out. Most shops are over $100 an hour now. My auto mechanic is at $110 !!

If you're interested to see what my day job is...

http://machinearts.com

Jay Decker
21-Feb-2010, 10:24
If you're interested to see what my day job is...

http://machinearts.com

Jeffrey - some of the examples on your website are exquisite!


If you find some one to make you one, have them make two. I need the exact same knob on my 2D.

Wayne

Wayne - I'll see if we can get a few made.


Does anyone know if this rise and fall system was standard (or a factory option) on the Kodak 2-D or if it is an after market modification?

svlindbe
21-Feb-2010, 12:06
My 2-D 8x10 has the type of rise/fall mechanism that Jim C has (on his camera, that is..). The knob has a short axle, and acts on a rack on the rear side of the front frame.

Svein

AJ Edmondson
21-Feb-2010, 12:15
Jeffrey, absolutely beautiful machine work! The artistry is undeniable. As a retiree from a surgical products manufacturer I have spent my fair share of time in a machine shop and have a deep appreciation for the art!

Glenn Thoreson
21-Feb-2010, 12:31
That is the standard rise used on all Kodak 2-D cameras. The only variation is the length of the shaft for the different camera formats. If I rmember right, the the threads are not the same as today's standards. The end of the shaft was peened to prevent the knob coming off. Over the decades, that would get worn by folks trying to unscrew the knob. Be sure to upset the shaft end a bit when you install your new knob or you'll lose it again. That's what the little nubbin off the end of the threads is for. :D

RichardRitter
21-Feb-2010, 12:48
Does anyone know if this rise and fall system was standard (or a factory option) on the Kodak 2-D or if it is an after market modification?
[/QUOTE]

Depend on the age of the camera. There were 3 different types of front raise used on the D 2 8 x 10 cameras.

Jim C.
21-Feb-2010, 17:45
Does anyone know if this rise and fall system was standard (or a factory option) on the Kodak 2-D or if it is an after market modification?


My best guess is that the dual geared slot was the earliest version of this mechanism
I have two 8X10 2D's, one was to be cannibalized but after seeing how complete it was I
decided to save it, that one had weird little bellows support spring inside the front
bellows and it was stamped with the year 1910, and the rear camera body has 200
stamped on it, I don't know the significance of that number but the spring part definitely dates
the dual geared slot rise mech. The second 2D I have has the rack and pinion knob that
I posted a picture of the parts I made and it has 174601 stamped on the rear base, so if the
wood stamped numbers are sequential then the rack and pinion knob is much later.

I'd love to know when certain design changes happened.

Glenn Thoreson
21-Feb-2010, 17:57
The number stamped on the wood is the match mark for the bed, front rail and extension rail. Those parts were made on a number of jigs and matched to each other by that number. Mismatched numbers mean slightly (or worse) mismatched parts that don't fit together well.

Jim C.
23-Feb-2010, 09:06
Depend on the age of the camera. There were 3 different types of front raise used on the D 2 8 x 10 cameras.

Richard, I know of the dual slot, and the pinion knob versions,
I'm curious as to what the third design was for the front raise ?

Rick Moore
23-Feb-2010, 14:57
Jeffrey - some of the examples on your website are exquisite!


No kidding! Superb work. The satellite wing strut in the examples section is my favorite.

Jim C.
23-Feb-2010, 15:31
That is the standard rise used on all Kodak 2-D cameras. The only variation is the length of the shaft for the different camera formats. If I rmember right, the the threads are not the same as today's standards. The end of the shaft was peened to prevent the knob coming off. Over the decades, that would get worn by folks trying to unscrew the knob. Be sure to upset the shaft end a bit when you install your new knob or you'll lose it again. That's what the little nubbin off the end of the threads is for. :D

On what I call the dual slot 2D like the one Jay posted pictures of, the front rise
knobs have a blind hole, the shaft end thread is oversize by .001" and looks to
be self tapping. No peening is necessary or possible.
The knobs you're thinking of are on the front /rear standard focus rack
those are pass thru holes.


The number stamped on the wood is the match mark for the bed, front rail and extension rail. Those parts were made on a number of jigs and matched to each other by that number. Mismatched numbers mean slightly (or worse) mismatched parts that don't fit together well.

The extension rail match numbers were not what I was referring to, the 200 number is stamped on the edge of the rear case where the film holder back is situated.