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View Full Version : Wet Plate, Dry Plate, what 8x10 is this?



Jon Wilson
30-Jan-2010, 08:20
I acquired this 8x10 studio camera several years ago. I have never used it, for I could not truly figure it out and/or I did not have an extra 8x10 back which I would fit to it. It is an O. Sichel camera made in London. Is it a wet plate camera? Is it a dry plate camera? Does anyone have any use for it? I am contemplating what to do with it.
Thank you for your assistance. Jon

Peter K
30-Jan-2010, 09:36
Jon, as one can see Sichel mentioned a telephone number. In the times telephone was more or less wide spread the wet plate process was only used in the graphic arts. Also in the second image your camera looks like a reproduction camera. What to do with it? Possible a nice bird's house? ;-)

Peter

wfwhitaker
30-Jan-2010, 09:55
Looks like a nice start for a horizontal 8x10 enlarger...

Jon Wilson
30-Jan-2010, 10:11
Jon, as one can see Sichel mentioned a telephone number. In the times telephone was more or less wide spread the wet plate process was only used in the graphic arts. Also in the second image your camera looks like a reproduction camera. What to do with it? Possible a nice bird's house? ;-)

Peter

Peter, it may well have been a reproduction camera which used roll film. There are holes on either side of the base of the camera. It came with a Taylor Hobson lens.

Walt, it may just have to be an 8x10 enlarger. :D I am finally seeing some progress in getting my darkroom set up. :eek: Which has been in the planning stages for years....or at least it seems so.

Jon

Jon Wilson
30-Jan-2010, 10:17
Here are a couple more images of this camera.

Peter K
30-Jan-2010, 10:40
Peter, it may well have been a reproduction camera which used roll film. There are holes on either side of the base of the camera. It came with a Taylor Hobson lens.
Rollfim wasn't often used for reproductions because the distance between raster screen and the sensitive material is very critically to get dots with the correct size and form. Later film was used with vaccum holders and specially with the introduction of the "contact screen" in the late Fifties.

The holes are possible for the axis, often seen with big handles on both sides, used to move the screen carrier.

Peter

Jon Wilson
30-Jan-2010, 14:53
Rollfim wasn't often used for reproductions because the distance between raster screen and the sensitive material is very critically to get dots with the correct size and form. Later film was used with vaccum holders and specially with the introduction of the "contact screen" in the late Fifties.

The holes are possible for the axis, often seen with big handles on both sides, used to move the screen carrier.

Peter

But there are 2 holes on one side and one on the other.
Here is another picture or two of the camera which has a rail extension of about 32 inches.

Jon

Peter K
30-Jan-2010, 15:59
There are other possibilities too e. g. the camera was equipped with a registration back to make separation negatives for a color process like the "Carbro process". For this sheet film was used.

Jon Wilson
30-Jan-2010, 21:23
Looks like a nice start for a horizontal 8x10 enlarger...

Well Will, maybe someone would like it for that purpose. It definitely has a sturdy gear system on it and the bellows are light tight, or at least they were when I last checked them a few years ago. I am open to offers.

Jon