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awldune
6-Jan-2010, 13:01
I recently acquired a Cambo SCII and have experience some learning curve issues.
I'm impressed with the modularity and the rotating back, but am hoping I can get the movements working a little smoother.

From an earlier thread here, I found links to some literature from Cambo, which has been helpful but did not answer all my questions.

The camera has friction movements, but I am not sure whether some parts should be lubed or not.

The focus rollers seem to be greased, and they sometimes slip on the rail. It kind of seems like they should be dry. I'm not sure whether they would grip better with some tension on the locking wheels or if the locking wheel friction is unrelated.

The part of the standard that slides over the uprights when making rise/fall movements is not lubed, and it seems stiff and difficult to move evenly. That is, I have to lift one side and then even out the other side. It seems like this should be easier and that a light grease would be appropriate. Any thoughts? It doesn't seem like the uprights are bent or out of square, which was my first thought.

No problems with the tilt, shift, or swing :)

I have a bag bellows, but was surprised I can't get infinity focus for my 90mm unless I put both standards on the same side of the tripod mount. I'll have to look for a recessed board. Unless there is a good way to balance the camera in this configuration?

Thanks for your help
Sam

bobwysiwyg
6-Jan-2010, 13:09
I'm no expert, but also have an older Cambo. I would be reluctant to 'lube' anything since it might lead to slippage and/or the accumulation of dirt and grit. As for the standard movement up and down, I know what you mean. I found that if you put your thumbs atop, or on the bottom of the standard and use your fingers to raise and lower both sides together it works better.

I will watch other replies from more experienced users.

rdenney
6-Jan-2010, 14:14
I always used a recessed board on my Calumet 45NX (basically, the same camera) with a 90mm lens. I was able to focus at infinity with a flat board, at least that's how I remember it, but the bellows were overcompressed; I recall my main motivation in getting a recessed board was to provide a little bellows movement. The bag bellows came later when I was trying to use even shorter lenses.

I don't think anything on these cameras should be lubed, particularly not the focus drive. Grease attracts dirt and grit, which will cause more problems than running the movements dry. You might need to clean some dirt out of the upright followers if they are sticky--maybe they were greased at some time in the past. But executing movements on this camera is usually a two-handed exercise.

Rick "you'll probably need an angled adapter for a cable release when using a Copal 0 in a recessed board" Denney

awldune
6-Jan-2010, 14:52
Thanks guys. I just got the camera and was playing with it on a marginal tripod head (need to swap in my 3047.) I expect the rise/fall will be easier on a sturdier base.

aduncanson
6-Jan-2010, 18:24
Make sure that your camera is set up with the lens board plane behind the uprights. Many ebay vendors (and once even Calumet) illustrate this camera with one or both standards reversed.

awldune
7-Jan-2010, 07:57
I have the front standard and rear standard oriented in the same direction (controls toward the back.)

It doesn't seem like the rear standard can be flipped except maybe with the film holder in portrait orientation. Not ideal for a wide angle.

lenser
7-Jan-2010, 08:02
You might make a quick call to Jose at Calumet repairs regarding whether this should or should not be lubed. 1800-calumet. They were the primary marketer for these cameras in the US.

rdenney
7-Jan-2010, 13:04
I have the front standard and rear standard oriented in the same direction (controls toward the back.)

It doesn't seem like the rear standard can be flipped except maybe with the film holder in portrait orientation. Not ideal for a wide angle.

Yes, and yes. Flipping the rear standard was the only way I could get a 47mm lens to focus at infinity, even with both standards on one side of the tripod block and using a recessed board and bag bellows. I had to use the vertical orientation, and still had problems with dark-slide clearance on roll-film holders. A 47 is just beyond the design envelope for that camera, and 65 might be as well. But 90 works fine with a recessed board, and probably 75 will also.

It is a good design overall and a nice system, but not the best choice for those wanting extreme wides, or strong wides on smaller roll-film formats.

Rick "for whom this was the main reason for switching to Sinar" Denney