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Robert Skeoch
22-Dec-2009, 08:00
Could you take a photo every day next year?

I think it would be a worthwhile challenge.

365 photos in one year. You can take more than one photo on any given day, but only one counts in the challenge.

It would be tough but I think I could do it.

So I challenge you. Can you take a photo a day in 2010.

The challenge is to take the photo. If you can't get it posted on the same day, or you have to wait a few days to get it printed that's fine. You can always post them a few days late.

And they have to be real photos... not snaps of your cat sleeping on the chair.

Some people might think they have to all shot with one camera or with one lenses... similar to the Leica challenge a few years back, but that doesn't matter here.

Just take one photo a day and try and post it.

I'm going to post this on a couple other forums as well and blog on it at www.thepicturedesk.blogspot.com.

Let me know if you're in.

Rob Skeoch
www.thepicturedesk.ca

Bruce Barlow
22-Dec-2009, 08:55
The best exercise we teach is the "One-a-Day" exercise:

Make one, and only one, picture a day as a discrete exercise, separate from any other photography you do. Take your time, and do the best that you can do with each one.

Richard Ritter did this for a year, and hung a killer show of the best ones.

It's tough to stick with, but your photography will improve dramatically, no matter how good you are right now.

jnanian
22-Dec-2009, 09:36
great idea rob!

do cameraless images count ... or does it have to be made using a camera ( make a photo instead of take one ) ?

- john

Andrew O'Neill
22-Dec-2009, 10:08
Maybe when I retire and the kids have moved out :)
I'm in my darkroom almost everyday making prints from negatives that have never seen the light of an enlarger...and carbon printing has been a fun learning curve.
If I'm not out with the camera, I take photos with my mind. Great exercise.

Greg Blank
22-Dec-2009, 18:46
This must be a common theme running through the art community, never the less interesting. I spoke with the exhibition curator at my local arts council in Nov regarding an invitational exhibit I am participating next Sept and expressed my thoughts about doing such a personal project of one 4x5 shot per day for a year. Really challenging imagery versus the common place. I derived the idea because I have a huge stash of slightly dated 4x5 B&W film and I am not shooting 4x5 BW film for much of my scenic work.

I would never show ongoing good stuff or crap though in a public forum. Too many hobbiests, so unique stuff I kind of want to reserve for making me a name :) Any way its an interesting idea.


Could you take a photo every day next year?

I think it would be a worthwhile challenge.

365 photos in one year. You can take more than one photo on any given day, but only one counts in the challenge.

It would be tough but I think I could do it.

So I challenge you. Can you take a photo a day in 2010.

The challenge is to take the photo. If you can't get it posted on the same day, or you have to wait a few days to get it printed that's fine. You can always post them a few days late.

And they have to be real photos... not snaps of your cat sleeping on the chair.

Some people might think they have to all shot with one camera or with one lenses... similar to the Leica challenge a few years back, but that doesn't matter here.

Just take one photo a day and try and post it.

I'm going to post this on a couple other forums as well and blog on it at www.thepicturedesk.blogspot.com.

Let me know if you're in.

Rob Skeoch
www.thepicturedesk.ca

Robert Skeoch
23-Dec-2009, 06:15
If you call it a "Photography" when you're done.... then it counts.
-rob

its Laurie
23-Dec-2009, 15:56
i know its not LF but this is really interesting...

http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/15131

http://photooftheday.hughcrawford.com/

same concept.

Heroique
23-Dec-2009, 16:27
...your photography will improve dramatically...

I appreciate the idealism of this claim, but question how often it’s true.

A lot of my best photography “happens” when I’m away from my work; and I’ve snapped many of my least inspired shots because I’m in the field on so many successive days.

Yet, these are two reasons why I still think the challenge is a great idea, even though I presume 97% of us endure too many conflicting claims on the time and dedication it would require.

I’d especially enjoy hearing how this day-to-day effort might affect one’s photography – both from the few who could carry through, and from those who, in the end, could not. The stories would be as much fun as the photos.

One comment I’d expect: “I find myself thinking a lot less about my equipment and technique, and a lot more about composition.” Who knows, maybe the opposite comment would pop-up more often! Another: “I never knew my neighborhood offered so many opportunities for LF photography – it was just a matter of getting out and looking.”

So I will certainly applaud anyone and everyone who accepts this most challenging of New Year’s resolutions.

And maybe additional people will “join” mid-year, inspired by the few who start on January 1st and keep posting great images, and sharing stories about them...

:rolleyes:

Brian Ellis
23-Dec-2009, 17:27
Anyone seen the movie "Smoke?" If not you should, especially in the context of this thread.

Bruce Barlow
24-Dec-2009, 05:41
I appreciate the idealism of this claim, but question how often its true.

Id especially enjoy hearing how this day-to-day effort might affect ones photography both from the few who could carry through, and from those who, in the end, could not. The stories would be as much fun as the photos.

One comment Id expect: I find myself thinking a lot less about my equipment and technique, and a lot more about composition. Who knows, maybe the opposite comment would pop-up more often! Another: I never knew my neighborhood offered so many opportunities for LF photography it was just a matter of getting out and looking.

So I will certainly applaud anyone and everyone who accepts this most challenging of New Years resolution.
:rolleyes:

There is no idealism in the claim. I have a bunch of high school students right now proving it true. They're just the latest crop. Richard Ritter proved it true. I have proved it true for myself, and I have also learned how hard it is to fit into life.

Usually those for whom it doesn't work are those who can't get out of their armchairs to actually do it.

Why don't you try it instead of just engaging in idle speculation? It may be that you learn things none of the rest of us do. And if that's the case, good for you!

Bill_1856
24-Dec-2009, 05:53
Bulls**t.

dfoo
24-Dec-2009, 06:00
That was a well thought out and well reasoned reply.

AJ Edmondson
24-Dec-2009, 06:34
I think it is a great idea and would really like to think I could carry through on it but I do not for a minute believe that I would have the discipline to complete the project. Just trying to "think through it" has already been an eye-opener as I suddenly realized how little I photograph within an hour's drive of home and - in thinking that through - I have to think that I just don't look for photographs until I cross that imaginary borderline!

Heroique
24-Dec-2009, 10:52
[...] Why don't you try it instead of just engaging in idle speculation? [...]

The portion of my post that mysteriously disappeared w/o ellipses when you quoted me helps address your question.

Here it is! ;)


[...] A lot of my best photography “happens” when I’m away from my work; and I’ve snapped many of my least inspired shots because I’m in the field on so many successive days. [...]

One of the best reasons to pursue this challenge is to find out whether it helps your photography or not. One of the worst is to determine the answer, and impose it on others. The best way is to try it out, share your experiences, and count on them not always being the same.

For example, I think that while one may discover that “practice makes perfect,” another might learn that “quantity doesn’t equal quality,” and may even reduce it. A third person might notice that daily time in the darkroom, not the field, is where improvement is. (His or her decision to quit on the 117th day might be the best decision they ever made.)

This is why I think the stories of this challenge would be as fun as the photos – and why the challenge itself is a great idea.

Bruce Barlow
25-Dec-2009, 04:44
...but not a great enough idea to try it for yourself...

I have yet to see anyone who actually tried it (rather than just talking about it) [I]not [I] have their photography improve substantially.

Your assertion that your best photographs happen when you're away from work and can concentrate in the field is of course true, as it is for me. But I think serious photographers can easily find value from this exercise, if for no other reason than we can't get away from our work often enough to devote the time we'd like to photograph in that concentrated way. And anyone who feels their full potential will develop from only these jaunts is, in my opinion and experience, kidding themselves.

Quantity may not equal quality, but I am positive that quantity will improve quality overall, if one puts in the effort. That makes the difference between workers and the also-rans. Why is it that photographers feel no need to practice, whereas serious workers in every other artistic medium do?

kev curry
25-Dec-2009, 06:58
That was a well thought out and well reasoned reply.

You should see him when he's having a bad day!

Diane Maher
25-Dec-2009, 07:15
The best exercise we teach is the "One-a-Day" exercise:

Make one, and only one, picture a day as a discrete exercise, separate from any other photography you do. Take your time, and do the best that you can do with each one.

Richard Ritter did this for a year, and hung a killer show of the best ones.

It's tough to stick with, but your photography will improve dramatically, no matter how good you are right now.

I agree that it is tough to stick with, especially if you are doing it with LF. I tried this for about a month in 2007, until I suddenly found myself at work for 12 hours a day for a month or so, trying to finish a really big project. That had put me into Nov./Dec. by the time it was finished and when I was at work so long, it made using LF a bit difficult, since I would rather shoot outside. Maybe I should have taken the initiative to shoot indoors and learn to use artificial lighting. Maybe I should do that this year. :D

Heroique
25-Dec-2009, 12:59
...but not a great enough idea to try it for yourself...


I think a really good thread – like I think this one is – introduces a traditional assumption, praises it for being safe and sound, then upon questioning it further, reveals an instructive ambiguity about it that had existed all along.

We all know things aren’t always what they seem in photography, or the other arts.

I’ve enjoyed time in the field with my equipment for more than 365 successive days – and I’m currently enjoying a much briefer run of 30 chilly days – but I have never taken a photo on 365 successive days, and will never force myself to do so.

Spending time in the field is what has taught me this lesson; if you can try this photo-a-day challenge, it might, counter intuitively, lead you to the same lesson. It's why I recommend it!

And it’s a lesson I can share: Know when to walk away from a scene. As many here recognize, this can be difficult. After all, who doesn’t feel the urge to snap a shot after spending time getting there, setting up, applying movements, and inspecting the ground glass. Yet, some of my greatest lessons in the field have come from not taking the picture. If you recognize there just isn’t a fit between your vision and a beautiful scene in front of you, don’t let that discourage you. Move on. Keep searching. And recognize you might not find a “fit” for the rest of the day, or the next. A long stretch of days w/o a photo is exactly what can lead you to the photo that works.

The important point for me: practice, practice, practice – but don’t force yourself into a mechanical routine or predictable pattern. That can blind you to other important lessons out there. Worse, it can be deadly to your photography.

r.e.
25-Dec-2009, 14:20
Know when to walk away from a scene.

Yup.

I think that the problem, with the advent of digital photography, is not that people don't photograph enough, but that they photograph too much.

Maybe making photographs every day for 365 days does something for some people, in which case it would seem to follow, there being no magic in the number 365, that one should photograph every day for 730 days, then 1460 days, then...

For me, at least, the wisdom in this is not self-evident.

So to answer Rob's initial question, no I'm not "in". For one thing, I'll be spending a couple of long days in early January at a museum/archive in the UK, and doing some scouting, just trying to figure out what I want to photograph in the community, and how I want to go about it, and I'm quite sure that that time will be better spent than taking photographs for no other reason than an arbitrary "challenge".

SteveKarr
25-Dec-2009, 16:03
You know what I see from this so far ... Someone inspiring us to do something great, and many "thinkers" thinking themselves into failure.

It's OK, it's human... but I for one will take the challenge.

Starting today ... 1 shot a day for 365 days... I may use the Leica too.

Stay tuned for the home page... SteveKarr2010.com ... I just bought it.

This is actually a big challenge for me for 2 reasons ...
a) I'm a people shooter & live alone. I really don't like shooting Rocks & Trees
b) I'm in Phoenix AZ and broke. Broke + Large Format = not eating as much.

Are there any Web guys here that can supply a simple template for us to use to post these images & make it easy for others to use. I'm a shooter ... not a web guy ... I'm afraid. So ... HELP !!! smiles...

So it's 5:03pm here in AZ ... Off I go ... into the big city...

Ho Ho !
Steve

r.e.
25-Dec-2009, 16:27
Are there any Web guys here that can supply a simple template for us to use to post these images & make it easy for others to use. I'm a shooter ... not a web guy ... I'm afraid. So ... HELP !!! smiles...

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of photo a day web sites. Some people use Flickr, etc., others their own domain, in which case any of the photo display programmes will work fine. Have a look at Tumblr. I've been using it for the last few weeks for something unrelated to photography, but it is extremely photography friendly and equally user friendly. If you want, you can set it up to use the URL that you've registered instead of their URL. I set it up that way, which took only a few minutes, and my domain started to show the content uploaded to Tumblr much faster than they advertise (took about three hours). The downside to Tumblr is that you won't get an image that fills the screen, as on this site by a Toronto photographer, one of the more popular photo a day sites, now in its third year: www.photoaday.ca

Forgive me if my lack of interest in this means, as you put it, that I'm "thinking myself into failure".

SteveKarr
25-Dec-2009, 17:01
Hi R.E.

Thanks for the great info, I'll check it out. I'm a web'new*b.

The comment about failure was not meant to be judgmental, just an observation. 'kinda like dieting, drinking more water, watching less TV... I just heard "why nots" in my head that seemed a bit habitual & limiting, that's all. Besides failure has a bad way in the US, I see it as "just didn't do it."

I remember having 3 little ones in my care all potty training at the same time. They'd make all kinds of reasons why they didn't have to go. but I'd always say, "Just try honey..."

Anyway... thanks again,
Steve

r.e.
25-Dec-2009, 17:43
There are suggestions in this thread that taking a photo a day will make one a substantially better photographer. Instead of arguing in the air about whether that is true, one can make one's own judgment by wading through a bunch of the gazillion photo a day sites on the internet. Having looked at a lot of them over the years, I don't see any evidence that the statement is true, nor do I see the point of the exercise. Others may come to a different conclusion.

SteveKarr
25-Dec-2009, 17:53
Hmmm... thinking again ...

Do it for 60 days and see what's for real, thought & scholarly acrobatics are not real...
only One's own Experiance is Real.

Like reading about pie on the internet, thinking about if the pie is good, seeing what others do with the pie... have some. At least then we can all have our own experience to draw from. Boy I love pie.

Wayne Crider
25-Dec-2009, 18:56
Outside of not being a big LF user, I guess you would have to look at it as taking an hour a day to practice something that your interested in. Just the practicing results in more experience and should definitely improve anything you do in whatever field, work or hobby related.
I guess I could shoot a few months of still life's or portraits (over and over) till the weather gets good as the light is too low for landscapes in the winter and after work. Perhaps instead a weekly/monthly genre and a quota of x number of shots instead? I'd have more time for that, and that's way more then probably 50% of the people around here shoot.

Jim Ewins
25-Dec-2009, 19:50
Anecdotal evidence is just anecdotal. Producing a lot of anything will seldom, in and of itself, produce quality.

Mark Barendt
25-Dec-2009, 20:37
Anecdotal evidence is just anecdotal. Producing a lot of anything will seldom, in and of itself, produce quality.

But the odds get better. ;)

SteveKarr
25-Dec-2009, 21:00
So some think if they buy the best guitar, read forums like this one, talk to other players on the subway, even think about it in the shower ... but only strum a few times a month they have a chance to win the high school talent show?

Nope. You'll always be a thinker, not a doer.

Just load some holders and go ...

Andrew O'Neill
25-Dec-2009, 22:32
SteveKarr, Do you have a wife and kids? You sound like someone who is single with no dependents. You sound like some photographers that I know.

SteveKarr
25-Dec-2009, 22:57
Ha! Well Andrew ... you're right for now... But I was just hopin' to help some others see they may be just not "in the habit" of shooting very often. I Think that's the meaning of the thread & really why I'm even bothering typing this at all. So the next 5 times the TV's on, get up & shooting something instead. Even if it's a picture of the stupid TV! And if there's a commitment to a project, with goals.. then that's a "great habit" to have. Isn't it?

and yea ...I'm just out of a 2 year relationship with a girl & her 3 little ones... when I was dad I couldn't play as I do now ... that's partially why I left, family life was killing my art. I'm 43 not 22, ... but I never let the fam kill my inner artist. I miss the little nuggets, but it's nice on this side of the fence too.

Sorry if I Hi-Jacked the thread or offended anyone...

SteveKarrShoots.com

Heroique
26-Dec-2009, 00:10
Anecdotal evidence is just anecdotal. Producing a lot of anything will seldom, in and of itself, produce quality.


But the odds get better. ;)

Not sure if I can match the wit & wisdom of the two statements above, but maybe I can summarize the two principal approaches we’ve heard so far:

1) The photo-a-day challenge guarantees only to improve your photography.

--- Vs. ---

2) The photo-a-day challenge may not improve your photography – but it could teach you unique lessons about it, such as, "This isn't helping."

Clearly my personal experience says #2, but we all know it’s not as simple as that.

:rolleyes:

Robert Skeoch
26-Dec-2009, 08:36
I guess we'll have to wait and find out which one it is.

-Rob

Mark Barendt
27-Dec-2009, 05:11
Not sure if I can match the wit & wisdom of the two statements above, but maybe I can summarize the two principal approaches weve heard so far:

1) The photo-a-day challenge guarantees only to improve your photography.

--- Vs. ---

2) The photo-a-day challenge may not improve your photography but it could teach you unique lessons about it, such as, "This isn't helping."

Clearly my personal experience says #2, but we all know its not as simple as that.

:rolleyes:

My point is only that the odds of creating a good photo is zero if the shutter doesn't drop.

kev curry
27-Dec-2009, 06:13
If someone cant immediately grasp the inherent value of practicing, performing and honing the same skills over and over and over, then I think its probably a safe bet to say that your wasting your time trying to convince them otherwise.

Bruce Barlow
27-Dec-2009, 07:39
Anecdotal evidence is just anecdotal. Producing a lot of anything will seldom, in and of itself, produce quality.

Producing a lot, carefully, will certainly produce quality.

You are flat wrong.

Any "photographer" who believes that less-will-produce-better, and there appear to be a number of them in this thread, are delusional.

Producing a lot willy-nilly with no care for quality will, of course, produce junk. Witness Flickr, where there are few truly serious photographers, and fewer working seriously. Judging the one-a-day exercise by their example is seriously misguided.

My exercise is about being careful, involved, and present in the making of one, and only one picture a day, as a serious effort. I have many examples of people for whom it has worked. I have no examples, and it is absurd to imagine it, where making one a day using the exercise was detrimental.

Someone who was actually interested in improving their photography would take the bones of the exercise and say to themselves "How can I make this work for me? What do I have to do to be successful with this effort?" take it from there, and go to work. Such thinking separates the workers from the idle thinkers.

It may be that your one-a-day activity uses, gasp, a point-and-shoot digital beast. I have students doing that now, with considerable success. I just inherited my 18-year-old son's Nikon D80, and I'm about to do the one-a-day exercise with it.

This makes the challenge into "how can I make this camera work for me?" Such thinking will help your LF work, too, as you consider how best to use the equipment you have. How do I know? I think that way about LF lenses, formats, and even the camera itself. I'm told it's the way artists think. You may even - double gasp - photograph subject matter you've never before considered - "This is the subject matter I have, how can I make it work for me?" For one-a-day, such an effort is survivable, and may even become enjoyable.

Just to finish with a tale, my son replaced his D80 with a Nikon D3S, and at the moment only has an old manual 50mm f1.8, and the undersized zoom from the D80. Last night he passed 8,000 exposures in one week since getting it. That is not a misprint. 8,000. He has at least 100 that I would be proud to have made, and those are only the ones I've seen. 100 keepers would take me 2,000 negatives at my historical batting average, a very productive year for me, and I won't even calculate the film cost. Yup, he's got a lotta bad ones, but they're all experiments as he learns what the camera can do, and develops his own compositional eye. He's learned more in the last 7 days than most of us have in the past 7 years. While 1,000-a-day is not one-a-day, he's getting radically better at a speed I've never seen in anyone. More evidence that quantitiy can produce quality, when carefully applied.

Bruce Barlow
27-Dec-2009, 07:48
If someone cant immediately grasp the inherent value of practicing, performing and honing the same skills over and over and over, then I think its probably a safe bet to say that your wasting your time trying to convince them otherwise.

Yeah, I have a friend who owns three Grammy awards. He's a cellist.

As far as I know, he practices scales a couple hours a day. Sounds boring, but as he puts it: "I learned how to fall in love with playing scales." He's not atypical of several other orchestra-class musicians I have known. He's even a happy and well-balanced person, apparently unpoisoned by practicing. And he recognizes that there is a value to doing something supposedly as mundane as practicing scales.

He gets it, and it shows.

SteveKarr
27-Dec-2009, 08:42
I once knew a girl for a short time who said she was a dress designer. All she did when we were at dinner is talk about & talk about "thinking about" dress designing.

The day I went to her place the first time (with manly thoughts in mind) I found a mess of dress making equipment in cases & plastic tubs. Everywhere. Stacked on top of each other. I ask her if she could help me sew a little project I was in need of... a simple door device for my darkroom. She said "I don't do that, I'm a dress designer"

I said "Well, it's good practice". She actually said, "I save my skills for the important dresses."

End of date. End of relationship. Game over.

kev curry
27-Dec-2009, 09:45
Yeah, I have a friend who owns three Grammy awards. He's a cellist.

As far as I know, he practices scales a couple hours a day. Sounds boring, but as he puts it: "I learned how to fall in love with playing scales." He's not atypical of several other orchestra-class musicians I have known. He's even a happy and well-balanced person, apparently unpoisoned by practicing. And he recognizes that there is a value to doing something supposedly as mundane as practicing scales.

He gets it, and it shows.

Yeah, I think the single most thing that seperates the best from the rest is hard graft, or in the words of one of your own country men Thomas Alva Edison...

"Success is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration."

and...

“Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”


and...

“I haven't failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work”

and some from Jim Rohn...

“Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.”

and ok last one...

“Some people dream of success while others wake up and work hard at it.”

John Bowen
27-Dec-2009, 11:27
OK, so let's assume just for a moment, that the one a day exercise won't make you a better photographer....hard for me to believe, but let's just, for the sake of argument, assume that you are such a god given talent that this exercise is worthless to you.

What else might you learn from this exercise? How about....

How to set your tripod/camera up quicker
How to focus your camera more quickly
How YOUR film interacts with YOUR developer
How the quality of light changes throughout the year
How to simplify your various photographic processes, be they in the field or darkroom
And I'm sure there is much more to learn.... YMMV

What you learn by NOT doing the exercise.....nothing.

I thought all the talkers hung out on Apug and all the photographers hung out at LF forum. Perhaps I'm wrong...

Greg Blank
27-Dec-2009, 17:10
John;

All good points and well thought out! My friend and I were talking at lunch last week
regarding the implimentation of the project. I have been looking at what one does if the wheather is non cooperative.

Although I am somewhat stoic about conditions my attempt las night of shooting in the rain was less than ideal. Still have the 8x10 negatives to process -so maybe I will be rewarded for trudging out in the evening slop.

My buddy advocated shooting all the images for the year of a single scene. I am sure one could do that with minimal effort, perhaps mixing some still life on "bad wheather days". But the simple exercise of getting up predawn, or whenever getting a good image prior to going to work is a discipline in and of itself through the winter
so I may mix the subject matter for sheer practical purposes.

I have commited to the project but not sure when exactly in the next week I will totally say its a go. I want to test my developer options with my slightly dated Delta 100 before I have a pile of unprocessed film with images on it. Previously I used PMK with happy feelings but have some reservations using it. Leaning back to using more dilute HC110.




OK, so let's assume just for a moment, that the one a day exercise won't make you a better photographer....hard for me to believe, but let's just, for the sake of argument, assume that you are such a god given talent that this exercise is worthless to you.

What else might you learn from this exercise? How about....

How to set your tripod/camera up quicker
How to focus your camera more quickly
How YOUR film interacts with YOUR developer
How the quality of light changes throughout the year
How to simplify your various photographic processes, be they in the field or darkroom
And I'm sure there is much more to learn.... YMMV

What you learn by NOT doing the exercise.....nothing.

I thought all the talkers hung out on Apug and all the photographers hung out at LF forum. Perhaps I'm wrong...

John Bowen
27-Dec-2009, 17:26
Greg,

Someone did a project a couple years ago titled something like "6:30am from my window." Shot the same scene, at the same time of day, every day for a year.

I imagine this is a pretty easy one a day, but with the right subject matter, it could produce some breath taking photos.

SteveKarr
27-Dec-2009, 17:44
I have commited to the project but not sure when exactly in the next week I will totally say its a go.


Yea Ha! Cowboy! Any others?

Robert Skeoch
28-Dec-2009, 09:57
I'm getting pumped for this challenge. I've checked my stock of chemicals, now I need to get some printing cleared up while I have time.
-rob

SteveKarr
28-Dec-2009, 10:02
Four days & counting ...

Gentlemen Load you Holders !!!

tgtaylor
28-Dec-2009, 11:03
8,000 exposures in one week!!! Let's see that's (7x24x60x60)/8000 = 1 exposure every 75.6 seconds!!!

Not to say that it can't be done, of course. You could, for example, mount a camera to your hat and program it to take an exposure every 75.6 seconds. Even then 2,667 exposures will be of your pillow or of the bedroom ceiling assuming you get your 8 hours of sleep.

Bruce Barlow
28-Dec-2009, 12:31
8,000 exposures in one week!!! Let's see that's (7x24x60x60)/8000 = 1 exposure every 75.6 seconds!!!

Not to say that it can't be done, of course. You could, for example, mount a camera to your hat and program it to take an exposure every 75.6 seconds. Even then 2,667 exposures will be of your pillow or of the bedroom ceiling assuming you get your 8 hours of sleep.

OK,here'sa f'rinstance: he was making pix of a musical ensemble. He gets them posed; they're expecting to hear one click. But no, he's got it set to 11 frames per second, and they hear a machine gun and start to laugh.

Result: incredible pictures of a relaxed group of people, as seen in something like almost 100 images (he shot them for a long time). That eats up a lot of exposures in a short period.

But your point is well taken: he's done little else since getting the camera. He just came in from 5 minutes on the front steps photographing beautiful afternoon light. "147 exposures," he told me. I would think his finger would be tired.

Kirk Keyes
28-Dec-2009, 12:47
Can every moment be a decisive moment? Especially when shooting at 11 fps?

John Bowen
28-Dec-2009, 13:21
Can every moment be a decisive moment? Especially when shooting at 11 fps?

Nope, but at 11fps you'll likely capture it when it happens ;)

Bruce Barlow
28-Dec-2009, 17:37
Nope, but at 11fps you'll likely capture it when it happens ;)

And he did. The machine gun group portrait instantly relaxed them into warm smiles. Bingo.

He can also set it to bracket one stop each for five frames. Lets him play with HDR portraits, which are really interesting.

Marko
28-Dec-2009, 18:07
8000 exposures in a week would be about 32 rolls of 35mm per day. I know some sports and wedding shooters who used to burn at least twice that many on an average assignment. Some years ago while they still shot film, that is.

Figure $10-$15 per roll of processed E6, depending on the lab and location, the experience would cost him bewtween $2200 and $3300 if he were shooting film. That's not counting the cost of camera and scanning.

This way, he got it for free, in the computer, available for instant preview. No wonder he's been able to improve so rapidly. :)

Marko
28-Dec-2009, 18:11
And he did. The machine gun group portrait instantly relaxed them into warm smiles. Bingo.

He can also set it to bracket one stop each for five frames. Lets him play with HDR portraits, which are really interesting.

Machine-gunning is also very useful as a cheap IS of sort - if you take a burst instead of a single click while handholding with a slow shutter speed, you improve your chances of getting at least one sharp frame several-fold.

Not to mention all the funny comments you get from old-timers and luddittes... :D

mike rosenlof
28-Dec-2009, 19:22
I did a self-portrait a day series for my 40th year. That was a while back (ended in '99). It was really good to have me thinking about trying to be creative with a photo of the "same old subject" every day. I missed a few days, but not many. I intended the final presentation to be 6x6 (yeah, medium format) films contact printed. It really was one photo per day. I dedicated a Mamiya TLR body to that project.

I tried to maintain a series for the year 2000, but failed at that one. I didn't have a clear/strong/simple enough theme. Maybe simple is the key.

cdholden
28-Dec-2009, 19:58
Could you take a photo every day next year?

I think it would be a worthwhile challenge.

[....]

Let me know if you're in.

Rob Skeoch
www.thepicturedesk.ca

Rob,
I'm in! Don't look for me to be scanning and posting. It's just something I'm doing for fun. I recently found my Yashica 124G that I thought was lost when we moved about 6 months ago, so I'm using this as an excuse to catch up on using it. It's like getting a free camera! I've got a few dozen rolls of Rollei Pan 25 (from when the birch wood boxes first came out) left that are anxiously waiting Jan 1. Even if it doesn't improve my composition, it will be a nice daily distraction from work.
Good luck with your shot of the day and have a Happy New Year.
Chris

tgtaylor
28-Dec-2009, 20:23
Saint Ansel (Pope John Paul or Benedict did cannonize him, didn't he?), who probably has more "keepers" than most - if not all - photographers living or dead, once wrote "If you get one good one a month, you're doing good!"

Unless you're shooting the same subject each day like Richard Misrach's Golden Gate series or doing general street photography, finding a suitable artistic subject matter every day is extremely difficult. For example, yesterday afternoon I found an appealing landscape but as soon as the sun started to shine upon it from the clouds, dense fog rolled in and I was thwarted. Today was completely overcast with rain. But I may have a three hour window tomorrow morning (:

Bruce Barlow
29-Dec-2009, 04:08
8000 exposures in a week would be about 32 rolls of 35mm per day. I know some sports and wedding shooters who used to burn at least twice that many on an average assignment. Some years ago while they still shot film, that is.

Figure $10-$15 per roll of processed E6, depending on the lab and location, the experience would cost him bewtween $2200 and $3300 if he were shooting film. That's not counting the cost of camera and scanning.

This way, he got it for free, in the computer, available for instant preview. No wonder he's been able to improve so rapidly. :)

Precisely. I started to figure out the cost (and time!) in 8x10 HP5 and got a headache.

It occurs to me that he doesn't need "the decisive moment," and just needs to "be there." The cost consideration negates the testosterone I have always associated with "the moment."

Good thing I'm still mostly using film so I can prove my manhood.

On the other hand, I admire his passion in becoming better.

More relevant to this thread: as Mr. Bowen knows, I have wonderful pictures pointing out my office window. I had thought about "one-an-hour" from dawn to dusk just to see how the light changes during the day. Less ambitious, but still useful, I think. 5x7 because I love the format. I need a sunny day.

John Bowen
29-Dec-2009, 05:39
More relevant to this thread: as Mr. Bowen knows, I have wonderful pictures pointing out my office window. I had thought about "one-an-hour" from dawn to dusk just to see how the light changes during the day. Less ambitious, but still useful, I think. 5x7 because I love the format. I need a sunny day.

Bruce,

Why do you need a sunny day? I think you would have beautiful photographs out your office window on a rainy day.

I think your office window would make an excellent subject for an "every day at 6:30am" project. Dedicate a tripod and camera to the project, make an exposure everyday at say, 6:30am (maybe Moses will do this for you....that's Bruce's Grey Parrot). Hell, you could use some damn digital camera for it, but at the end of the year I'll bet you have a wonderful series of photographs detailing the changing sun angles and changing seasons. Think about it.

madmax12
29-Dec-2009, 07:47
I am in to do this . I am new to LF and this would kick me hard to shoot . Lokk forward to the images.:D

Bruce Barlow
29-Dec-2009, 12:47
Bruce,

Why do you need a sunny day? I think you would have beautiful photographs out your office window on a rainy day.

I think your office window would make an excellent subject for an "every day at 6:30am" project. Dedicate a tripod and camera to the project, make an exposure everyday at say, 6:30am (maybe Moses will do this for you....that's Bruce's Grey Parrot). Hell, you could use some damn digital camera for it, but at the end of the year I'll bet you have a wonderful series of photographs detailing the changing sun angles and changing seasons. Think about it.

I want to see the more dramatic changes to the light in sunlight. Overcast would be too similar, although, as I preach, I should try it.

I'm less interested in the same-time-each-day, I guess.

Cheers!

Alan Butcher
29-Dec-2009, 13:03
Throughout the book, Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell repeatedly mentions the "10,000-Hour Rule", claiming that the key to success in any field is, to a large extent, a matter of practicing a specific task for a total of around 10,000 hours.

Doing the photo a day challenge will add to your hours needed for success.

Whatever the weather there is always something to photograph, maybe this will get me to do some still life images that I have been meaning to take for a couple of years, I can also photograph in the barn, photograph outside in the rain or snow. I do not find subject matter to be an issue if I spend time outdoors on the farm.

I am going to do the photo a day, and on some days many more.

--
Alan

SteveKarr
29-Dec-2009, 14:10
http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/8645/giagraveritoi.jpg
Awa ... don't let the clouds get in the way... It was actually cloudy (and cold) here in Phoenix so I did a shot inside...


Here's my photo of the day for yesterday. I'm 4 days for four. I do need a little help in a web site thou ... anybody got a cool template?

... This is a bad Idea after all ... I'm down 15 sheets of X Ray film & 4-6 hours of my life. The $2.25 in film & processing really could have been better used in a SLOW photo assistant's cash flow ...
but I have 4 images ... two are actually pretty good.

I think my Today models (my arty neighbor kids) are going to stiff me ... so maybe I'll take a still life of my Cowboy boots!

jnanian
29-Dec-2009, 14:40
i'll try to give it a go rob,
i have been doing something similar for a few years,
so hopefully a few extra days won't be too much of a stretch ...

Vaughn
29-Dec-2009, 15:01
Nah...I'll let you folks handle this one. If photographing semi-steadily for 30+ years has not improved my eye, I don't think a photo a day for a year will do much for me either.;)

I will make the effort to see the light everyday -- not just glance at it. After all, that is why I photograph in the first place.

Have fun!

Vaughn

Greg Blank
29-Dec-2009, 15:48
Perfect oppurtunity to add some fuel to the fire or food for thought to those who deem that practice can't improve your skills. Up until my recent conversation with my local gallery exhibit coordinator which formed my desire for this sort of project,... I had recently in Late October read "Lust for Life" by Irving Stone which is a Novel about Vincent Van Gogh's life. It is rooted mostly in fact, according to the included synopsis by Stone. I can recommend the book if you can find it and have time to read it.

Van Gogh created all of his paintings within ten years. He painted about 900 total canvases. Some years were more productive true, some months he painted 30+ plus canvases one or more per day. He sacrificed eating many times to pay his rent, and to buy canvas and paint. Vincent Van Gogh some deemed to be crazy, & many of those who said he had no talent are remembered less fondly in the historic sense of art. I don't know if anyone else here paints but I do, and it puts loading one fricking film holder and snapping one measly image per day for a year into it proper context. Bravo if you can find something worthwhile to say, and "BOO" if you think watching the light change counts.

Nothing personal, just my 2 cents.



Nah...I'll let you folks handle this one. If photographing semi-steadily for 30+ years has not improved my eye, I don't think a photo a day for a year will do much for me either.;)

I will make the effort to see the light everyday -- not just glance at it. After all, that is why I photograph in the first place.

Have fun!

Vaughn

Vaughn
29-Dec-2009, 16:26
No offense taken...one size does not fit all.

It is not watching the light the change that counts -- it is how one watches the light change.

If it did not cost 44 cents to mail you a penny, I'd send you your change, no offense intended, of course...;)

Vaughn

tgtaylor
29-Dec-2009, 18:10
Van Gogh created all of his paintings within ten years. He painted about 900 total canvases. Some years were more productive true, some months he painted 30+ plus canvases one or more per day. He sacrificed eating many times to pay his rent, and to buy canvas and paint. Vincent Van Gogh some deemed to be crazy, & many of those who said he had no talent are remembered less fondly in the historic sense of art. I don't know if anyone else here paints but I do, and it puts loading one fricking film holder and snapping one measly image per day for a year into it proper context. Bravo if you can find something worthwhile to say, and "BOO" if you think watching the light change counts.

Nothing personal, just my 2 cents.

Thanks for the book reference Greg. I plan on checking it out from the library in the coming days.

As far as "...loading one fricking film holder and snapping one measly image per day for a year into it proper context..." keep in mind that it is not that simple for certain types of photography.

Take landscape photography, for example. Sunday I came across a landscape that is worthy of a sheet of film or artisits canvass. At the time the atmospheric conditions were not photographically acceptable and I didn't open the shutter. Now Van Gough, on the other hand, could have painted it right there and then since he had the proper visualization. I couldn't shoot it yesterday because it rained and was overcast. I did shoot it earlier today but the sky conditions weren't "ideal" so I'll be returning until I "get it right." Maybe I do and don't realize it yet because I don't have another print else to compare it with. Van Gough wouldn't have that problem as he could simply revise the view at home.

Thomas

jnanian
29-Dec-2009, 18:43
the thing taking photographs every day does
is it not only lets using a camera become second nature,
but it also allows us to leave our comfort zone and
photograph things we normally wouldn't lift a camera to ...

Vaughn
29-Dec-2009, 19:25
I do that by using MF cameras (Rolleiflex TLR and a Diana Camera) instead of my 8x10. Using an 8x10 has become second nature. It is seeing that I want to become second nature.

A photo a day is a great exercise, no doubt about it -- but as I said, one size does not fit all. But on a cost/benefit basis, the benefits for me vs the cost tells me I have better ways to spend my energy, money and time. I find giving workshops, making images and prints, exploring new ways to produce images/prints, managing a teaching darkroom, and raising three 12 year old boys (and fulfilling other family obligations) takes up most of my time.

However, I can fit in the practice of seeing during most of these activities -- and it is far more than watching the light change. In fact, I would go as far to say that the practice of seeing is exactly the purpose behind a photo a day (or would be for me). One just does not always need a camera to practice.

Vaughn

SteveKarr
29-Dec-2009, 19:35
Jesus, Three 12 years old boys ... WOW ......

http://img136.imageshack.us/img136/1681/boothleica.jpg (http://img136.imageshack.us/i/boothleica.jpg/)

I got stood up...

SteveKarr
29-Dec-2009, 19:37
I lift weights with my eyes ... same thing.

Mark Barendt
29-Dec-2009, 19:53
Part of the intrigue of doing a project like this is forcing myself to be creative.

I won't be able to stay in my comfort zone and I will have to find workable subjects regardless of the weather, my mood, my format, my preferred subjects.

If landscape doesn't work one day, a portrait, street shot, or still life might have to.

Vaughn
29-Dec-2009, 21:02
Jesus, Three 12 years old boys ... WOW ......
I got stood up...

Yeah! If packing an 8x10 around for a few miles doesn't keep me in shape, the Boys will!

Great image! Nice way to express getting stood up!

Below -- the boys this summer at White Sands, NM

SteveKarr
29-Dec-2009, 23:30
Heck ... One for the tripod, One for the holder case & one for the camera case. You carry your own ice tea thou ... it's only fair!

John Bowen
30-Dec-2009, 05:05
I lift weights with my eyes ... same thing.

LOL

Robert Skeoch
30-Dec-2009, 09:42
I'm sure we'll all be taking our share of night photos this year... some very close to midnight.
-rob

Heroique
30-Dec-2009, 15:58
— Roots of European Beech, just down my street (plus a fun crop)
— Photo taken yesterday, Tuesday, 12/29/09
— Film processed last night
— Film scanned this morning
— Image posted just now

As I said back in post #18, my personal field experience teaches me two lessons about “photo-a-day” challenges: first, never to join one of any duration; and second, never to tell someone else whether or not it’s a good idea for them.

That’s why I continue to applaud Rob’s challenge :) – it’s a great idea because only one’s real experience (not someone else’s) can determine what helps (or hinders!) one’s personal photography.

In a phrase, I believe no one can determine for you whether you’ll discover days like January 1st, or numbers like 365, or any type of “practice-by-design” are meaningful; they may very well prove to be so. I’ll only add that if I thought they were, I would have entered this challenge, too – and perhaps waited for January 1st to arrive so I could “begin” taking pictures.

My personal preference? To believe the only meaningful day or number … is. That’s right, “is,” not will be, or might be, or could be. It’s why today, I enjoyed my 35th successive day in the field (well, I think), and have about 10 photos to show for it – not 35 – including the humble one below.

So The Best of Luck to Rob and the participants he’s recruited! Even though I’m not “in,” I hope valuable lessons keep greeting us all in 2010, and look forward to the fun photos & entertaining stories to come out of this challenge.

Tachi 4x5
Schneider XL 110mm/5.6
Polaroid Type 55
14 sec. @ f/32 (that’s reciprocity!)
Epson 4990/Epson Scan

Laurent
31-Dec-2009, 05:29
I'm in Rob !

I've been looking for new year's resolution and already had the big resolution to properly determine true film speed + processing times for my 4x5 (TXP in HC110). I've been contemplating this "one a day" exercise for a while, and it's the right moment for this.

In my case, the good-old AE1-Program will do the trick, my job schedule does not allow LF for this. I've already benefited from Bruce's exercises (the main benefit being reading "Drawing on the right brain" and doing the exercises, of course after reading "Finely focused").

Last year, I tried bringing my trusty TLR at least once a week, and have been surprised by the number of keepers I got from this unformal shooting. It also allowed me to discover some suject matters I wouldn't have considered before (now, when I need to photograph and conditions are bad (be it weather, time, family...) I "do mechanisms" : I try to find some mechanical part and get a good shot of it).

So I'll load the camera to day and will dedicate it to this project for one year. I'm already half convinced that the benefit of this project is the commitment it requires, which could then be "declined" to other projects.

Laurent

Robert Skeoch
31-Dec-2009, 08:21
For those that plan on taking part.
Once you get started you might choose to post your photos. If you want to great, if not that's fine also.
I plan to post to my blog but have also started a Flickr.com group for anyone who needs a place to post their photos.

The group is....
http://www.flickr.com/groups/1273915@N25/

It's called Rob's Photo a Day Challenge 2010.

-Rob Skeoch

Andre Noble
31-Dec-2009, 11:57
Does one picture a day apply to any format? or just Large Format?

Robert Hughes
31-Dec-2009, 12:31
So, do we have to use the same camera every day? Is this limited to LF, or can I use my cellphone camera - it's a lot easier uploading from that. Also, in our part of the world it's either dark outside or work time - I go to work and drive home in the dark - must I shoot indoors all winter, or forgo lunch?

Marko
31-Dec-2009, 13:26
Some people (http://www.ardini.nl/en/2009/11/06/iphone-365-project-halfway/) have been doing it with iPhone (they carry it around all the time anyway). Many people (http://www.flickr.com/groups/project_365/pool/), in fact.

Camera is not very relevant here, it's the seeing that matters.

Andrew O'Neill
31-Dec-2009, 13:27
I think Rob said it's what you want it to be...

John Bowen
31-Dec-2009, 13:42
The 35mm, 4x5, 5x7, 8x10 & 7x17 holders are loaded and ready to go. I plan on shooting whichever format best fits the subject and my available time. I expect over 1/2 of my images will be on 35mm, but we'll see how it goes.

Good luck everyone and remember....HAVE FUN!

Robert Skeoch
1-Jan-2010, 07:18
If you call it a photograph when you're done. Then it counts.
-rob

Robert Hughes
1-Jan-2010, 18:08
Well, I got off to a bad start - had my 8x10 box camera on the Minneapolis ice with two film holders - and re-used the first holder! Oops, double exposure. Can I get a make-up shot tomorrow?

Robert Skeoch
1-Jan-2010, 18:25
sure... since we're making the rules up anyway.
-rob

Jim collum
1-Jan-2010, 20:09
Found an interesting site designed for the 'photo a day' crowd.

here's my start.

http://www.blipfoto.com/JamesCollum

RDB Korn
2-Jan-2010, 09:32
I've also begun, looking forward to being able to work on my compositional skills in a consistent way.

Posting the results here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rdbkorn/sets/72157623121611670/

Robert Hughes
4-Jan-2010, 19:28
I'm debating going out for a little "moonrise on the ice" shooting tonight - but it's -20F outside! :eek: The moon doesn't come up for another hour or so, I may reconsider...

Jim collum
4-Jan-2010, 19:34
I've also begun, looking forward to being able to work on my compositional skills in a consistent way.

Posting the results here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rdbkorn/sets/72157623121611670/

have been watching it.. excellent progress so far!

Scratched Glass
5-Jan-2010, 04:40
With 4x5 film I would never be able to afford it! I think I might give it a try for 90 days, but will have to use the roll film holder to be able to afford it. I could use 35mm or a point and shoot, but I want to get practice with the LF camera.

Wayne Crider
5-Jan-2010, 16:49
Thanks Jim for the link.

Jim collum
5-Jan-2010, 18:43
Thanks Jim for the link.

have you start anything there?

RDB Korn
5-Jan-2010, 22:04
have been watching it.. excellent progress so far!

Thanks, Jim! I'm enjoying your work on the project, as well.

Robert Skeoch
10-Jan-2010, 18:10
I hope everyone is still going strong.
I'm 10 for 10 right now... and have even caught up with my printing at blogging.

-rob

Jim collum
10-Jan-2010, 18:16
yup.. 10 for 10 here :)

only 355 left

Greg Blank
10-Jan-2010, 18:39
As a staus report I "officially" started my project today 1-10-2010. My birthday was 1-8-2010 and I considered starting that day because I typically am off on Fridays and it would be easiest to do standard set time of day, type series. However todays' date seemed a better one to start on - so I started Friday then restarted today. I have a variety of subjects to alternate through the year yet they will connect to at least one central theme I have.

Good news is I have my film testing completed so it should be easier sailing from here.





I hope everyone is still going strong.
I'm 10 for 10 right now... and have even caught up with my printing at blogging.

-rob

Greg Blank
24-Jan-2010, 16:09
You guys still doing this? , I am :)


Could you take a photo every day next year?

I think it would be a worthwhile challenge.

365 photos in one year. You can take more than one photo on any given day, but only one counts in the challenge.

It would be tough but I think I could do it.

So I challenge you. Can you take a photo a day in 2010.

Rob Skeoch
www.thepicturedesk.ca

Mark Barendt
24-Jan-2010, 16:40
Still and yet.

Alan Butcher
24-Jan-2010, 17:11
Every day, I have noticed that my camera is getting lighter.
--
Alan

redrockcoulee
24-Jan-2010, 17:44
Will be doing my today's shot soon. I decided to also do a topic per month and this month is night or artifical light shots. Not using LF for this assignment but it is challenging to do it everyday.

Robert Skeoch
24-Jan-2010, 17:58
I'm still in... 24 for 24.
I've even caught up with my printing and blog.
-Rob

redrockcoulee
24-Jan-2010, 18:05
Had to go and walk the dog. Seeing as Rob's challenge was so open ended I decided that I would use my digital SLR seeing as that is the system I am least likely to choose to take if I am going on a photography outing. I also decided that each month I would tackle a theme or type of photography I normally do not do. Not sure what Feb will be as am away for a week on a course and visiting relatives but one month in the summer will be garden flowers for example.

So far I have gotten some interesting (to me anyways) shoots, learnt some of the D200 features I either have not used before or not for a long time and managed to get cold fingers one evening when my wife and I were out doing street scenes. Thanks Rob for the challenge. 24 for 24 so far as far as getting a shot, perhaps more like 12 for 24 for more interesting shots.

RDB Korn
24-Jan-2010, 20:29
I'm also keeping up, 24 for 24. Redrock, I view this as an artistic practice rather than a need to get a great shot each time out. If you have 12 interesting shots so far, that sounds might fine to me. I was posting my shots on flickr, but have switched to posting to a blog, where I write a bit about the experience each day. You follow my progress at thebertieproject.blogspot.com (http://thebertieproject.blogspot.com)

Brian Ellis
24-Jan-2010, 21:09
And he did. The machine gun group portrait instantly relaxed them into warm smiles. Bingo.

He can also set it to bracket one stop each for five frames. Lets him play with HDR portraits, which are really interesting.

Spray and Pray is king.

redrockcoulee
24-Jan-2010, 22:00
I'm also keeping up, 24 for 24. Redrock, I view this as an artistic practice rather than a need to get a great shot each time out. If you have 12 interesting shots so far, that sounds might fine to me. I was posting my shots on flickr, but have switched to posting to a blog, where I write a bit about the experience each day. You follow my progress at thebertieproject.blogspot.com (http://thebertieproject.blogspot.com)

Yes I am using it as a learning experience. I am quite pleased with some of my images and all of them are ones I would not have captured otherwise. My own regular photography is not part of the one a day unless it meets my monthly assigment as well. Some days are just harder than others :)

Jim collum
24-Jan-2010, 22:34
24 for 24 here as well.. it's been fun.. i need to figure out a theme for February though

Robert Skeoch
29-Jan-2010, 17:30
I have a couple themes on the go.
Shells
Weeds
Wolves
Hockey

-rob

madmax12
29-Jan-2010, 17:50
I have been fair I think I got 22 out of 24 need to develope and work on it

Bruce Barlow
30-Jan-2010, 07:45
Spray and Pray is king.

Nope. I've watched him, and reviewed what he's done. He has at least one reason or objective for each mini-exercise that he does. He' developing faster as a photographer than any student I've ever had. The "machine gun" approach to a group portrait was genius as a means of settling the subjects and geting past the typical plasticity so often seen. Once everyone was laughing, the pictures improved radically.

As far as I can see, he's redefining how one can learn and develop as a photographer. Once I figger it all out, it's an article.

Robert Skeoch
31-Jan-2010, 14:24
This is rather costly.
So far I've learned the shutter in my Fuji 300mm C for the 8x10 is sticking and needs repair.
And the shutter in the Minolta camera body I bought so I could use my Sony Zeiss lenses needs repair.
-rob

Greg Blank
31-Jan-2010, 19:34
Just prior to me starting my project on the 10th I did some testing, that day the wind chill was minus seven here, in Maryland. Which is cold for us. My shutter was sticking due to infrequent use and the cold. I've mostly been shooting early in the morning and using f/32 , f/45, f/64 so times exceeding 1 second are normal. Even with that sticky shutter using the shutter on T is not a problem.

I also have been rotating lenses, am shooting on 4x5, I haven't missed a day the real discipline so far has been just shooting ONE picture. If I shoot many more than one per day, I'll run out of the 5 hundred sheets I have stock piled >:(

When its rainy out doors I shoot inside during lunch, Omega has a lot of interesting older machines in our shop.




This is rather costly.
So far I've learned the shutter in my Fuji 300mm C for the 8x10 is sticking and needs repair.
And the shutter in the Minolta camera body I bought so I could use my Sony Zeiss lenses needs repair.
-rob

Jim collum
31-Jan-2010, 19:37
First month down... 31 for 31. Have a few hours to figure out the next theme....

Jim collum
2-Feb-2010, 09:13
First month down... 31 for 31. Have a few hours to figure out the next theme....

Anyone else doing this by theme? Figured out February

February 2010
I've been living in the Santa Cruz, Ca region for over 20 years now. There have been people I've passed weekly while walking through town, in parks, who I've seen time after time. I don't know them, don't know their story.. but i know their faces. For February, I'll try to meet many of them, learn their stories, and ask to borrow their likeness for record. Their stories will remain mine (... for those in the area, the opportunity is there for you to learn if you wish it), but their likeness will be posted here http://www.blipfoto.com/JamesCollum

Paul Kierstead
2-Feb-2010, 10:27
Well, I've been trudging along since about the 10th. I think I'm hitting about 80%. I'll give you this: When you often don't see any sunlight, it is damn tough to hit one a day, let alone one a day you are happy with. It is barely light when I go to work, and dark when I get home. Been getting out on some lunch hours, but 2 a week are taken with fitness. It is quite a bit harder then I expected, but I am accepting that misses happen here and there and try to keep it at at least 5 days a week. Hopefully when the days get longer, it'll get to more.

I've not been theming, and not been restricting myself by any particular format; so far, I've done two different digital cams and a few on my GW690 (almost LF....). I expect LF more when it gets a little more light and warmer.

http://www.bovinelove.com for the latest (earlier in the month is a bit disorganized in the archives). Nothing to write home about, but I've been enjoying the process.

Greg Blank
3-Feb-2010, 16:19
Hi Paul;

A couple of things, I have an hour lunch and a vehicle to travel about. I've been packing my lunch or shooting just before going to work. Some days I have been giving up lunch to make a shot I was happy with, within the alloted time frame....its good discipline. This project which should be considered a fun event represents a very small portion of the imagery I generate during a year. On average weddings and everything else combined about 10,000 per year for the last few years. Over the 26 years of my photo history I know I have some 100,000 plus images both film and digital combined. This is supposed to be a fun project so every image does not have to be perfect or even come out. Doing just one shot though t me is the ultimate in trusting my own ability, so that is what I strive for.

I like this project because I am learning from the setting up, finding the image on limited time and processing the images with positive desire to see how I did. I in truth feel more positive than I have felt in several years because I am carrying the 4x5 again :)

I also get up a few mornings at 5:30 am and go to a local spot along my travel route that makes an interesting study of light changing. That's a portion of my overall body of work I go there and do the shot at the same time each time. I try to make at least one shot there a week though not always in the same tripod holes :)

I also take a couple of items along with me in the event I run dry on scenery, I whip out these two items and place them in a scene to interact together near and far or juxaposed. On drastically miserable days I shoot the interior of the factory where I work. We have a lot of old machining equipment. If I had a scenario like yours I probably would do studio shots of items around home or buy flowers, you can always give them to your wife or sister/mother. Could be any thing you photo, make them become other things!

Hope this helps!


Well, I've been trudging along since about the 10th. I think I'm hitting about 80%. I'll give you this: When you often don't see any sunlight, it is damn tough to hit one a day, let alone one a day you are happy with. It is barely light when I go to work, and dark when I get home. Been getting out on some lunch hours, but 2 a week are taken with fitness. It is quite a bit harder then I expected, but I am accepting that misses happen here and there and try to keep it at at least 5 days a week. Hopefully when the days get longer, it'll get to more.

I've not been theming, and not been restricting myself by any particular format; so far, I've done two different digital cams and a few on my GW690 (almost LF....). I expect LF more when it gets a little more light and warmer.

http://www.bovinelove.com for the latest (earlier in the month is a bit disorganized in the archives). Nothing to write home about, but I've been enjoying the process.

Robert Skeoch
5-Feb-2010, 17:39
I took the 8x10 with me to work on Tuesday and found a photo during my lunch break. Same thing on Wednesday. Thursday I had some time before work so checked out a waterfall... it was so nice I went back again today. I shot almost a box of film this week.

-Rob

redrockcoulee
5-Feb-2010, 21:29
Good thing I did not choice to do the snapshot of the dog thing, my old friend past way this morning. I had already taken my photo during coffee break at work just before I found out she past away otherwise I would have missed my first day of the year. This month is fences and last month was night shots. It is great to have the "need" to shoot every single day whether one feels like it or not. I have been taking photos of her on her death bed and even one after wards as well but not as my shot a day.

Rob, i might be in your neck of the woods later this month, need to find out my activites after the workshop I am attending (not photographic related).

Short note of Query's passing, she had heart problems and was taking medications for the last 5 or 6 years and today passed away at 15 years and 3 1/2 months and on the 10th anniversary of being diagonsed with breast cancer. Passed away in her sleep not unexpectedly today but still the pain is great as I am sure that everyone who loves and lost a pet would know. Brittany Spaniels are special!

Mark Barendt
6-Feb-2010, 01:44
Brittany Spaniels are special!

Yes they are, glad you had many years with her.

Marco Milazzo
8-Feb-2010, 05:13
I've been doing this project with digital cameras since January 1. Some days, it's a scramble to shoot an image, process it, and upload it to my Smugmug Gallery -- I can't imagine doing the same thing with large format cameras.

I salute you those of you who are actually doing that.

Greg Blank
10-Feb-2010, 14:35
It's not been easy. I wandered out today in the blizzard with the 8x10 camera.
I also took my <gasp> D200. I got some nice shots of the town I live in. Here's one of many.



I've been doing this project with digital cameras since January 1. Some days, it's a scramble to shoot an image, process it, and upload it to my Smugmug Gallery -- I can't imagine doing the same thing with large format cameras.

I salute you those of you who are actually doing that.

Heroique
30-Sep-2010, 14:30
The “Field work vs. LF forum” thread triggered my memory of Rob’s “Photo-a-Day” challenge – so I thought I’d look into this…

Wow, seems the year-long challenge went Dark after just 40 days :confused:. Here we are, it’s several months later, we’re into autumn … any Marathoners still on the run?

Jim, Paul, Marco, Greg, and – especially – Rob, are you still active? You and all the brave ones who accepted this challenge have our support, of course. Please update us! And if anyone had to break-off from the challenge – or is making use of an occasional “rest period” – your updates & lessons would be interesting, too...

Robert Skeoch
2-Oct-2010, 09:50
I think for the most part the challenge has ended. I certainly wasn't able to keep it up. For a number of us the darkroom work just got farther and farther behind. I still have shots I would like to print but can't get the time in the darkroom.

I for one learned a lot. I found working in the studio with the 8x10 very enjoyable and plan to do a number of still life's in the future. I also enjoyed the daily practise this challenge gave.... it's just that darn darkroom work that I couldn't keep it up.

Needless to say if a person did this with a digital solution it would be much easier.

Also I think it helps if you travel a bit. When shooting every day the same area gets a little stale.

-Rob

Brian C. Miller
2-Oct-2010, 11:58
"Needless to say if a person did this with a digital solution it would be much easier."

Polaroid! Polaroid! er, Fuji! Fuji! Fuji!

Or maybe a digi of the ground glass.

Alan Butcher
31-Dec-2010, 10:40
At 12:46pm today, I completed the photo a day project. All photos were large format, 509 4x5 and 56 8x10 negatives. It was an interesting project, but at times was a challenge. If I had not been retired, this would have involved a lot of either night or studio photographs. The only incident was my Wisner 4x5 going over a waterfall (8-15ft) on 25 June, by 7 July repaired and back in use.

Things I may have learned.

My composition is better.
Camera weight does not make much difference.

This year maybe at least a photo a week project, I do not rule out doing this again but it will not be 2011, need time for therapy. :)

Monty McCutchen
31-Dec-2010, 12:44
At 12:46pm today, I completed the photo a day project. All photos were large format, 509 4x5 and 56 8x10 negatives. It was an interesting project, but at times was a challenge. If I had not been retired, this would have involved a lot of either night or studio photographs. The only incident was my Wisner 4x5 going over a waterfall (8-15ft) on 25 June, by 7 July repaired and back in use.

Things I may have learned.

My composition is better.
Camera weight does not make much difference.

This year maybe at least a photo a week project, I do not rule out doing this again but it will not be 2011, need time for therapy. :)


Outstanding. That is quite an accomplishment! Congrats on persevering!

Monty

Heroique
31-Dec-2010, 12:54
At 12:46pm today, I completed the photo a day project.

[Sound of wild cheers & thunderous applause.]


...I need time for therapy.

I would too, after watching my Wisner 4x5 float over a waterfall!

;)

hmf
31-Dec-2010, 14:57
At 12:46pm today, I completed the photo a day project. All photos were large format, 509 4x5 and 56 8x10 negatives. It was an interesting project, but at times was a challenge. If I had not been retired, this would have involved a lot of either night or studio photographs. The only incident was my Wisner 4x5 going over a waterfall (8-15ft) on 25 June, by 7 July repaired and back in use.

Things I may have learned.

My composition is better.
Camera weight does not make much difference.

This year maybe at least a photo a week project, I do not rule out doing this again but it will not be 2011, need time for therapy. :)

Wow, I'm impressed. And, this makes me pause for some soul searching; I've been thinking of doing a variation of this for years but never seem to get started. I suppose tomorrow morning would be it, if I don't put it off yet another year ....

Jay DeFehr
31-Dec-2010, 15:51
I make a photo a day, except on the days I don't, but there aren't many of those. I think the value in an exercise like this one, if there is any, likely lies in the values of discipline, regimentation, and habituation. I'm very skeptical of any artistic value, beyond those indirectly related to the more practical ones already noted, and the value of those is heavily personality dependent. It might be a good exercise for someone who has a hard time getting motivated to make photos, or someone who procrastinates, or otherwise lacks discipline. The value for someone who obsesses is not as clear. There was a time when I felt photography interfered with my life, and others in my life agreed. For me, taking a year off from making any photos was more beneficial to my photography than any rigid regimen could possibly have been. The idea that something like making a photo a day, as an exercise, is universally beneficial, is as preposterous as the cellist practicing scales analogy offered earlier in the thread. Photography, unlike playing the cello, does not rely on manual dexterity, unless one is a photojournalist, war correspondent, or perhaps, street photographer. Muscle memory, limberness and dexterity play incidental roles for most photographers, not the central roles they play for an orchestra musician. Julia is a classically trained concert pianist, and I marvel at her abilities, but having them doesn't confer any important advantages to a photographer. The attitudes expressed in this thread that thinking isn't important, or even real, according to one poster, and that we, as photographers are better off making lots of photos than thinking about a few, reduces photography to a skill to be learned by repetition, like playing a chromatic scale, or typing, as opposed to creating music, or literature.

mdm
31-Dec-2010, 16:06
Congratulations.

I saw your post and was tempted myself, but I think I might wait untill I retire to follow your example.

Alan Butcher
31-Dec-2010, 16:22
The attitudes expressed in this thread that thinking isn't important, or even real, according to one poster, and that we, as photographers are better off making lots of photos than thinking about a few, reduces photography to a skill to be learned by repetition, like playing a chromatic scale, or typing, as opposed to creating music, or literature.

I agree that any value in repetition was quickly achieved. Some of the best pictures taken during the year were from seeing a scene one day, thinking about the possibilities and then returning another day to take the picture. Most of the pictures I took during the year were on my farm, about 1/2 mile square, so many of the scenes were looked at multiple times.

A photo a day is either OCD behavior or insanity (Doing the same thing over and over expecting a difference result) I got only pictures while expecting masterpieces.:)

I did get some fine pictures.

Jay DeFehr
31-Dec-2010, 17:24
Alan,

I admire your tenacity, and I'm sure you made some fine photos. Happy New Year!

Jim Graves
31-Dec-2010, 17:26
Alan ... that is an incredible accomplishment ... congratulations. You have inspired me to get out and shoot ... maybe not a picture a day, but way more than I have been lately. Thanks!