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Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
15-Jul-2009, 11:36
As announced today in the PMA Newsletter:

"Heidelberger announces new printing process
Press manufacturer Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, Heildelberg, Germany, announces the first exhibition of photographs printed with the High Definition Skia Photography (HDSP) process.The HDSP printing process delivers high quality photo prints on conventional offset paper, reproducing fine textures and details. The new technology, which works directly from the negative -- the skiagraphic image -- produces photographs without the need for a darkroom. According to Heidelberger, the necessary quality is achieved by ensuring the right interplay between press, software, and consumables -- ink in particular.
Dieter Kirchner, inventor of HSDP, and Heidelberger Druckmaschinen are organizing an exhibition of around 50 photographs at the Print Media Academy in Heidelberg from July 20-24, 2009. It will include contributions from notable photographers, with all photos printed on Heidelberg presses.
In HDSP, negatives, slides or raw data are recorded in two different digital data sets. An electronic darkroom program uses this data to calculate all gamma curves that are of relevance to the developing process for printing purposes. Based on a defined digital image, the photographer adjusts the paper gradation as he previously did in the darkroom. Prints are produced using special inks adapted to the developer substances. This also turns the press into a darkroom, the key difference being that the printing process is reproducible. This printing technology is based on a new standardization process for uniform, optimized color separation and the design of the new Heidelberg presses. As a result, it is possible to print even short runs with barely perceptible fluctuations in tone.
Unlike conventional photo paper, which has a limited image gamut, HDSP exhibits an image gamut that lies at the limit of visual perception. All visible components captured by the camera are transferred to the print."

Richard M. Coda
15-Jul-2009, 13:43
Yeah, I'd like to see that! :rolleyes:

Greg Lockrey
15-Jul-2009, 13:46
Oh Oh... I'm going to have to get me one of those. ;) ;)

GPS
15-Jul-2009, 13:52
That's certainly a way to go - bravo to the inventor!

Eric Woodbury
15-Jul-2009, 14:05
How much? I know, if you have to ask....

Drew Wiley
15-Jul-2009, 14:54
Eric - HDSP also officially stands for "heart disease and stroke prevention", which is
exactly what you're going to need if you actually do find out the price!

William McEwen
16-Jul-2009, 08:57
Is the Heidleberger Press something each photographer buys, or is this something that pro labs use?

Richard M. Coda
16-Jul-2009, 09:28
"for publication" seem to be the key words. This relates to books and posters, not real photographic prints.

Drew Wiley
16-Jul-2009, 10:08
As Richard suggested, this is obviously something for short-run high-end editions. In other words, an industrial investment in printing equipment (not photolabs per se) and probably also a restricted client list or waiting list. A nice addition to the cumulative visual voculary, no doubt, but I'll stick to amidol !

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
16-Jul-2009, 10:49
"for publication" seem to be the key words. This relates to books and posters, not real photographic prints.

I am not so sure:
"The new technology, which works directly from the negative -- the skiagraphic image -- produces photographs without the need for a darkroom. According to Heidelberger, the necessary quality is achieved by ensuring the right interplay between press, software, and consumables -- ink in particular.
Dieter Kirchner, inventor of HSDP, and Heidelberger Druckmaschinen are organizing an exhibition of around 50 photographs at the Print Media Academy in Heidelberg from July 20-24, 2009. It will include contributions from notable photographers, with all photos printed on Heidelberg presses."

That sounds like individual prints can come off the press.

The question is "what is a press?" Is it something the size of an ink jet or laser printer or is it something only found in quick print or offset print shops, or larger?

Ron Marshall
16-Jul-2009, 10:56
The prints for the exhibit were prited using a Speedmaster XL 105.

http://www.heidelberg.com/www/html/en/content/articles/press_lounge/company/local_events/090707_pma_expo


http://heidelberg.com/www/html/en/content/products/sheetfed_offset/70x100/speedmaster_xl_105

Drew Wiley
16-Jul-2009, 11:41
Heidelburg presses are big industrial offset machines, generally linked to expensive
proprietary software packages. Definitely not something for the home darkroom user
or conventional lab. This is commecial printing technology, not photographic printing
or anything resembling conventional inkjet. Heidelburg is a well-known name in that
trade.

bvstaples
16-Jul-2009, 12:43
The last Heidelburg I was involved in purchasing (a 102) ran about five million, with service contracts and what not. Oh yeah, it's half the size of your average house!

What will be interesting is to watch this technology filter down to smaller presses, especially the short run digital imaging presses. It'll be a few years, but it will most likely happen.

Imagine in ten years walking into a Kinko's and making a continuous tone print from your negative for a few bucks...

Drew Wiley
16-Jul-2009, 14:06
Probably someone like Magnolia Press in this neighborhood would be interested in
offering a service like this. Nice people, and I'm working with a fancy remodel project
in the vicinity, but they aren't interested in printing your work unless you are a brand
name NYC artist who can fetch 50K to a million per piece. Very restricted client list,
even snootier than Fresson. The trouble with hypothetically downsizing the hadware
end of this, is that when it finally does end up at Kinkos, some minimum wage gofer
will drop a banana peel or peanut butter sandwich in the works, and the machine will
be out of service 80% of the time, unless you like the particular hues of peanut butter
and jelly on your print! And you can't build a machine which is both precise and
durable with a bunch of cheap plastic parts!

David Spivak-Focus Magazine
16-Jul-2009, 14:54
First of all - it's Heidelberg, not Heidelberger! The XL 105 is what all high end books, magazines and printed materials are printed on, including Focus Magazine. The plates that are configured for this machine vary in line screen from 200 - 400. This sounds like quite an interesting opportunity for a publication that revolves around photography to research.