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Nana Sousa Dias
23-Jan-2009, 02:49
Has anyone tried Rollei film developers? Is there anything comparable to D76 or ID 11?

Sevo
23-Jan-2009, 11:00
They are more related to Spur etc. Haven't ever used them with anything besides Rollei film (which is not available as sheet film right now) - they took lots of testing even there. With other brand film the numbers on the spec sheet will be a even less useful base for tests, so you may have to blow a box or two of sheets on them to work out the proper timing.

Sevo

Nana Sousa Dias
23-Jan-2009, 20:27
Thank you, Sevo.

RJ-
29-Jan-2009, 09:57
Has anyone tried Rollei film developers? Is there anything comparable to D76 or ID 11?

Hi Nana,

the literature on Rollei developers seem to be scattered around the internet with little emphasis on Rollei film developer for large format film, most being concentrated on smaller formats for R3, Superpan, IR400 and ATP1.1 type films. Of the Rollei R3, RLC and RHS developers, none of these show the generic attributes of D76 nor ID11.

The RLC seems identical the former Labor-Partner Docufine (extremely fine grain) developer in being as expensive and fine grained, however offering little advantage over Ilford Perceptol. It may be beneficial for you since it has a higher operating temperature for development. Otherwise, I think I would use it more, being an ideal film developer for landscape work. Labor-Partner used to supply Docufine in 1 litre brown stock bottles; the RLC seems to offer a third of the molar concentration for the same volume at a hugely challenging price point, and its smaller sizes seems to suggest that it is targeting the 35mm format market directly. It is an effective developer for high contrast film like Maco Ort. Technical Pan and Rollei IR400 too.

Similarly, the Rollei R3 shows much in common with Ilford Perceptol (metol), being an ideal developer for R3 film and IR400 at ISO25 and ISO3 respectively, however working out more costly than Ilford Perceptol and operates better as a depth developer. It is available in larger bottles and is offers fine grain and contrast control than either ID11 or D76.

The RHS (High Speed) developer is quite exceptional, both in terms of its cost and its small vial size, barely offering enough to develop a handful of sheets. However it is the favoured combination for developing Rollei R3 film at ISO 3200 - 6400 perhaps the only recently available sheet film capable of being push-processed for LF nocturnal hand-held work. It has far superior push-processing control than D76 or ID11, and rivals Ilford Microphen in that respect (when tested with Rollei R3 film).

All of the Rollei developers have the advantages of direct dilution from the liquid stock. In answer to your question - the Rollei developers are a confusing blend of both relabelled/marketed developers, in addition to newer formulations for specific Rollei branded and associated brand film products. They will probably not offer the generic ease of ID11 or D76, however have superior characteristics for set film combinations for more specialist application.

Kind regards,

RJ

Nana Sousa Dias
29-Jan-2009, 11:34
Hi Nana,

the literature on Rollei developers seem to be scattered around the internet with little emphasis on Rollei film developer for large format film, most being concentrated on smaller formats for R3, Superpan, IR400 and ATP1.1 type films. Of the Rollei R3, RLC and RHS developers, none of these show the generic attributes of D76 nor ID11.

The RLC seems identical the former Labor-Partner Docufine (extremely fine grain) developer in being as expensive and fine grained, however offering little advantage over Ilford Perceptol. It may be beneficial for you since it has a higher operating temperature for development. Otherwise, I think I would use it more, being an ideal film developer for landscape work. Labor-Partner used to supply Docufine in 1 litre brown stock bottles; the RLC seems to offer a third of the molar concentration for the same volume at a hugely challenging price point, and its smaller sizes seems to suggest that it is targeting the 35mm format market directly. It is an effective developer for high contrast film like Maco Ort. Technical Pan and Rollei IR400 too.

Similarly, the Rollei R3 shows much in common with Ilford Perceptol (metol), being an ideal developer for R3 film and IR400 at ISO25 and ISO3 respectively, however working out more costly than Ilford Perceptol and operates better as a depth developer. It is available in larger bottles and is offers fine grain and contrast control than either ID11 or D76.

The RHS (High Speed) developer is quite exceptional, both in terms of its cost and its small vial size, barely offering enough to develop a handful of sheets. However it is the favoured combination for developing Rollei R3 film at ISO 3200 - 6400 perhaps the only recently available sheet film capable of being push-processed for LF nocturnal hand-held work. It has far superior push-processing control than D76 or ID11, and rivals Ilford Microphen in that respect (when tested with Rollei R3 film).

All of the Rollei developers have the advantages of direct dilution from the liquid stock. In answer to your question - the Rollei developers are a confusing blend of both relabelled/marketed developers, in addition to newer formulations for specific Rollei branded and associated brand film products. They will probably not offer the generic ease of ID11 or D76, however have superior characteristics for set film combinations for more specialist application.

Kind regards,

RJ

Thank you very, very much for your help, RJ!

There isn't much information on these chemicals, your help was precious, to me. In Portugal, we are now dealing with stock problems with some chemicals and there is a new Photography Shop, in Lisbon, wich is dedicated to analog products, but they are stocking only Rodinal and Rollei developers. I am telling all of my friends and students who shoot analog medium and large format to start buying there, hoping that the shop doesn't close soon but I was completely on the dark side as to Rollei developers. Sorry for my "latin" english.

RJ-
29-Jan-2009, 13:07
Hi Nana,

No problem with Latin English; English on the other hand... :)

Although some use rodinal as a general developer, like the Rollei R3 (Low speed) developer, it works better for speeds up to ISO200.

Rodinal offers better acutance (definition) with grain; whereas Rollei R3 Low Speed developer offers finer grain yet only a weak acutance effect. The Rollei RLC is perhaps too obscure and expensive for anyone to use, other than the specialist high resolution type document films now on offer.

Ilford has not marketed nor distributed Paterson FX39 prolifically in Europe, however I'm finding it ideal as a choice for a universal developer: it offers higher acutance than Rodinal, with finer grain characteristics; it also acts as a compensating developer at low dilutions (thus, no loss of film speed). Its half-life is the main drawback, particularly if used in dilutions of 1:50, however as a sheet film user, it shouldn't be a problem.



Kind regards,

RJ