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mdd99
14-Jan-2009, 18:56
I have about 10 pairs of gloves and mittens (made of various materials) I've purchased over the years to keep my fingers warm in the depths of winter. I've tried just about everything, including ski apparel. Finally, I may have found a decent combo: a pair of Footjoy winter golf gloves (excellent grip on their own) as a liner inside a pair of down gloves.

What winter apparel secrets work for you?

Filmnut
14-Jan-2009, 19:24
I don't know what temps you're working in, but this is what I've done before. I live in Toronto, Ontario, and do most of my winter shooting around here, and as much as a couple of hundred miles north. So, it gets very cold -20C.,or more, but not arctic cold. Wild chill pushes things to the -40'sC.
To keep my hands warm, I've also found that two pairs work the best. I used to work in the lab biz, before it all went digital, and I'd take a pair of cotton gloves, which are thin, single layer cotton, then put my heavy gloves over top. This combination is much better than the single heavy glove. This also helps if I have to take a glove off to work something on the camera.
For outerwear, I have a down gore-tex parka, and use layers underneath, with lined shell pants.
Footwear depending on the situation, ie., walking, deep snow, or just cold, snowshoes, etc.
Keith

John Kasaian
14-Jan-2009, 19:46
Well, I still have a duffle bag of my US Army arctic gear but it is certainly overkill in my neck of the woods! I do find my old standard issue army gloves excellent for photography--ones with the black leather shells and od wool liners.

For sweaters the old wool 5 button gunnery sweater is still my fave even though it makes me look like Grandpa Jones on Hee Haw reruns. It really is great when being active in snow---there are five buttons to help "vent"

One of the best investments I ever made was a pair of gaitors. If you wear jeans and walk through wet grass the moisure will wick up your jeans and you end up walking in a pair of cold wet pants (flashback to the first day of kindergarten!) This is not comfortable at all. A pair of gaitors will protect your lower trouser legs and keep your jeans dry.
Lets see----polypropolene longjohns? that will keep you warm and comfy...along with a half pint flask of brandy, or maybe a few of those miniature plastic bottles of peppermint schnapps and a thermos of hot cocoa in order to assemble a field expedient "dirty girl scout." :D

RichardRitter
15-Jan-2009, 05:33
What winter apparel secrets work for you?

Common scene.

It's 3 below zero as I write this. If the streams were not snowed over I would be packing to go photographing. But since I can not see the water where the ice would be, the warm darkroom look like a better place to be.

String and two safety pins. Run string down both sleeves and attach to gloves. Gloves will never get lost or end up on the ground full of snow.

The tip on the golf gloves sound good.

Nathan Potter
15-Jan-2009, 09:53
Hey Richard, I see you're a true "yankee". I remember my mom used your trick when I was a tot in Lincoln MA. The string was run from one glove up the first sleeve, over the shoulder, then down the other sleeve. They were hand knitted gloves with tie loops knitted right in. Never lost a glove; but then I wasn't focused on image making at the time. Thanks for the memories.

Nate Potter, Austin TX.

evan clarke
15-Jan-2009, 11:07
Ice Armor gloves, Under Armor skivvies and Arctic Armor snow suit. The gloves have a pouch for a little chemical handwarmer which positions on the back of your hand and warms the blood supply to your fingers. The AA suit is amazingly thin and I have worn it comfortably in -42 deg. w.c. situations. The whole suit (parka and bibs) will float 450 pounds!!..Evan Clarke

Winger
15-Jan-2009, 12:25
I wish I had some USArmy arctic gear. Unfortunately, all the extras around here seem to be desert apparel.
Luckily, my mom knits and is pretty creative (and good). She has made some pretty funky mitten/glove things that have separate fingers for my thumb and index fingers (the ones I really use when shooting), with a big mitten to flop back over the whole hand for warmth when I'm just walking. I do agree on using a thin liner under thicker gloves or mittens. I have a pair of silk liners that are nice and warm all by themselves. And even if they're cumbersome, mittens are warmer than gloves.
I currently don't have warm boots and am really ticked I can't find a pair I like. My venerable leather/gortex/thinsulate ones bit the dust after 10 years.
I tend to get cold easily, so I frequently wear tights under jeans (sometimes flannel lined) and lots of layers. Though if I'm going to be moving around, I go with less.
And I HATE wearing hats. My hair always ends up in my face and the hat slides down over my eyes.

ki6mf
15-Jan-2009, 15:29
Boston area! Currently 14 F today! Avoid all cotton clothes at all costs. Cotton has capillary action and will spread any moisture over the surface of your garment! Wool is fine and will keep you warm if somewhat wet. You will need to treat wool garments with Lanolin from time to time. If wool is your thing get garments with long fibers in them! I avoid down clothing cause if you get it wet in the field your shooting is over. You body looses moisture in the form of perspiration/sweat and you need to let it evaporate away if not you trap moisture and the cold will drop your body temperature and hypothermia can set in.

Layers of any material like polyester will keep you warm. The more the better. I only use poly clothes. Poly lets moisture escape and cotton does not.

I look at outlet malls, Marshals, and TJ MAx for 2X 3X sizes so as I build up layers and have movement. You may need to go to several stores to stock up on everything. In the east coast I use LL Bean, Eastern Mountain Sports, REI Coop. I found a hooded poly sweatshirt on sale at Macy's ( I haven't seen any hooded poly sweatshirts except for some special climbing ones at Eastern Mountain Sports for $150 each! Shop the sales!

Personal Preferences: Upper body Next to the skin poly long sleeve under ware, poly T Shirt, Poly 2X mock turtleneck, and finally a Eastern Mountain Poly long sleeve sweater made for climbing with a thumb hole in the cuff so it stays in place. I occasionally add have a hooded poly sweatshirt on really cold days. For my ears I have a poly head band that goes around my forehead back of my neck and covers my ears. My outer jacket is a lined parka with nylon shell and poly on the inside, with insulated hood on my jacket. I have some thicker poly gloves that protect against wind and let me slip my hands out for fine focus. I also have a pair of mittens that let you slip the tip where you ringers off so you can feel the camera with your fingers.

For pants I ware poly long underwear and have recently bought a pair of snow board pants. Get them larger so they give flexibility. I also have a face mask that is flexible poly and elastic design it can cover the entire hear of will stretch to just cover my neck. It has a nose guard and breathing slits for the nose and mouth. Underneath everything is poly long underwear for top and bottom. Really cold days also brings out a fake fur bomber hat that covers my ears.

Shoes! I buy Sorrel boots with an inch of insulation and made in Canada along with thick wool poly blend socks. These have real rubber bottoms and leather uppers. Buy the kind that lace up and go above your ankles. I have a pair of 2X gortex gaiters to keep snow off my lower legs. XL size gaiters wont fit over my pants and thermal underwear so needed to go up a size. Try them on at a sporting goods store first. I am moving away from gaiters due to the use of snow board pants which have built in gaiters, poly insulation, and nylon shell. You may need suspenders on the outer pants. An alternative to snow board pants (you are paying for the snow board experience) are insulated work pants from Carhartt. They treat their cotton bib overalls so moisture stays out. Only get insulated. Get gaiters for this type of gear.

I also keep a pair of Neoprene 5MM fly fishing waders in my car. I got these from Cabelas for $90.00. There are 5MM and 3MM thickness. Get the thicker. If you go into the water get wading boots. Felt bottom soles stick to slimy rocks better than lug bottom soles. A wading staff helps keep you balanced too. Don't go wading alone! If in doubt turn back. Turn back any way wading in the winter is not for everyone! Put your cell phone in a zip lock bag for when you get in trouble!

Carry an extra pair of clothes in your car too!

Finally get hand lotion and Burts Bees lip balm on before heading out. You should also drink fluids to replace the moisture lost due to perspiration and the cold which will dehydrate you!

Noeyedear
15-Jan-2009, 15:37
Marino wool thermal underwear, very toasty. Cycling gloves work well with LF.

Kevin.

John Kasaian
15-Jan-2009, 16:46
I wish I had some USArmy arctic gear. Unfortunately, all the extras around here seem to be desert apparel.
Luckily, my mom knits and is pretty creative (and good). She has made some pretty funky mitten/glove things that have separate fingers for my thumb and index fingers (the ones I really use when shooting), with a big mitten to flop back over the whole hand for warmth when I'm just walking. I do agree on using a thin liner under thicker gloves or mittens. I have a pair of silk liners that are nice and warm all by themselves. And even if they're cumbersome, mittens are warmer than gloves.
I currently don't have warm boots and am really ticked I can't find a pair I like. My venerable leather/gortex/thinsulate ones bit the dust after 10 years.
I tend to get cold easily, so I frequently wear tights under jeans (sometimes flannel lined) and lots of layers. Though if I'm going to be moving around, I go with less.
And I HATE wearing hats. My hair always ends up in my face and the hat slides down over my eyes.

If there is an army-navy store in your area, ask if they've got the insulated rubber "mickey mouse" boots :)

mdd99
17-Jan-2009, 08:26
I also discovered a brand of socks called "SmartWool" that wear like iron but are ultra soft and warm; beneath them, I wear a thin liner sock that wicks away the moisture.

I picked up a pair of flannel-lined LL Bean jeans, which I wear over silk long underwear. Toasty.

shmoo
17-Jan-2009, 13:40
Flip flops, shorts, and t-shirts...we've been having an unseasonably warm spell this week...close to 90's...now we're in the high 70's..very weird.

;)

seawolf66
19-Jan-2009, 11:21
The Winter Boots I ever had was the ones my Son Gave me Air Force Muck Alucks , Dam I wish I could find some now for this darn snow!

Jim MacKenzie
19-Jan-2009, 13:23
The only thing I haven't seen mentioned that I'd add is those warming packs you can get. They're useful for feet if it's severely cold, and they're useful for hands even in moderate cold.

And, perhaps, a pair of snowshoes... they can help you get to where you want to go without exhausting yourself.

paul08
19-Jan-2009, 17:32
I used sailing gloves for years (just the very ends of the fingers exposed, unlike most fingerless gloves). Last year my wife bought me a pair of heavy, dense fleece fingerless gloves from Patagonia. They expose a bit more of my fingers (but still not as much as regular fingerless gloves), but they also have a long gauntlet that goes over a sleeve. Very warm and very LF friendly! Here's a link:

http://www.7daysoutdoors.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=65

dpetersen
19-Jan-2009, 18:51
Hey all,

We can get some pretty cold weather in the upper midwest (-29F air temp last week) and over time I have found some things that seem to work for me. Hands-I use thin undergloves (at most ski shops) under fly fishing mittens that will fold back and expose 1/2 finger gloves, I use Simms brand but Patagonia and Cabella's sell them also. In really cold weather a warm pack helps. Feet-I have a pair of Rocky hunting boots with thinsulate and along with merino wool socks my feet rarely get cold. I imagine you could use heat packs in your boots also. The ice fishermen around here use the disposable heat packs a lot.
Long underwear of the wicking variety and a few thin layers can really keep you warm in really cold weather. Now, if I could just get a defroster for my ground glass.....

BTW...Anyone that goes out in the cold and wades through hip deep snow lugging a large camera. tripod, and other gear shouldn't throw stones...BUT...These guys that walk out on the ice, drill a hole in it, and then sit on a 5 gallon bucket waiting for a fish to bite really can't be right

Dick Petersen
Clinton, Iowa

Darren H
29-Jan-2009, 05:47
A couple of pieces I really like for winter-

North Face Redpoint Optimus jacket. Mid weight Primaloft insulation jacket. Warm and has a great hood (one of best ever used) and I have used it with layers in -25 temps. As a bonus the pockets are big enough to slip in a QUICKLOAD holder! My favorite winter piece.

North face DIAD shell. Rainjacket packs up about the size of a paperback. Fits in a lens pocket in my LowePro Pack.

Mountain Hardware Monkeyman Pullover. Plush and warm for when temps drop. Like all regular fleece it blocks no wind so you need a shell.

Manzella Next to Skin Shell gloves. Great lightweight gloves for mild temps. Still give good dexterity.




If you are interested in good quality winter gear check out the Patagonia web specials. They make the MARS equipment and have it at listed on sale at great prices (for Patagonia) but because it is Military issue it is all green. Like a DAS Parka for $75 or an R2 jacket for $55.

http://www.patagonia.com/usa/product/web_specials.jsp?OPTION=WEB_SPECIALS_LANDING_PAGE_HANDLER&catcode=WS.WEB_SPECIALS&ws=true&ln=41

r.e.
29-Jan-2009, 13:50
In November, I decided by a new winter coat. Purchased a Canada Goose Expedition Parka. It was expensive, but also far and away the best winter coat that I've ever owned. While in New York a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a number of people wearing Canada Goose coats of one kind or another. I guess that they're becoming trendy. Trendy or not, they are wonderful: www.canada-goose.com

bvstaples
29-Jan-2009, 13:57
Flip flops, shorts, and t-shirts...we've been having an unseasonably warm spell this week...close to 90's...now we're in the high 70's..very weird.

;)

I'm with you Schmoo, I was under the OB pier this weekend shooting and I was wearing shorts, an aloha shirt, and flip flops. As the Sun set, I did have to don a hat, though.

Joseph O'Neil
29-Jan-2009, 14:16
In November, I decided by a new winter coat. Purchased a Canada Goose Expedition Parka. It was expensive, but also far and away the best winter coat that I've ever owned. While in New York a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a number of people wearing Canada Goose coats of one kind or another. I guess that they're becoming trendy. Trendy or not, they are wonderful: www.canada-goose.com

about ten years ago I bought a down filled parka here in Canada at the TSC store (a farm supply retail chain). Plain black, rather dull looking,b ut warmest coat I have ever worn. Back then the name was "Golden Goose", made in Canada, makes me wonder if it is the same company? But back to the point, yes, a goose down filled winter jacket is incredibly warm, especially if you dress in layers underneath.

As for winter underwear, Stanfield's wool mix winter long johns and undershirts are unbeatable. Wool keeps you warm even if it gets wet. Wool socks too, or a wool mix. Highly reccomended.

Keep your head warm too.
joe

Michael Graves
30-Jan-2009, 03:51
A lazy boy recliner, a snifter of Remy Martin and a good book in front of a fireplace. Mendelssohn in the background.

RichardRitter
30-Jan-2009, 09:02
The optical glass I put in a few of the windows. I can photograph right through then. No need to go out side when its snowing and windy.

John Bowen
30-Jan-2009, 19:11
Hey Richard, I see you're a true "yankee". I remember my mom used your trick when I was a tot in Lincoln MA. The string was run from one glove up the first sleeve, over the shoulder, then down the other sleeve. They were hand knitted gloves with tie loops knitted right in. Never lost a glove; but then I wasn't focused on image making at the time. Thanks for the memories.

Nate Potter, Austin TX.

Yes Richard, thanks. My mom used the same "trick" when I was a child growing up in the snow belts of Western New York (south of Buffalo). Mom knit our gloves and the string/yarn was "built in." :)