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Anders_HK
12-Jan-2009, 05:59
Hi,

Being new to 4x5... This page states indicate that I can use Fuji Quickload film in Kodak Readyload holder... http://www.butzi.net/reviews/readyquick.htm

Any experience on how well that works? No glitches???

My aim is to primarily use Fuji Velvia 50 and Provia 100, but I am curious to try Kodak Tri-X as well.

Thanks!

Anders

Bruce Watson
12-Jan-2009, 06:09
Being new to 4x5... This page states indicate that I can use Fuji Quickload film in Kodak Readyload holder... http://www.butzi.net/reviews/readyquick.htm

Any experience on how well that works? No glitches???

My aim is to primarily use Fuji Velvia 50 and Provia 100, but I am curious to try Kodak Tri-X as well.

Kodak is out of the readyload biz. And they never released Tri-X in readyload format anyway.

While it's conceivable that a readyload holder will work flawlessly with quickloads, it's more likely that a quickload holder will do a better job since it's designed for quickloads.

Anders_HK
12-Jan-2009, 07:29
Kodak is out of the readyload biz. And they never released Tri-X in readyload format anyway.

While it's conceivable that a readyload holder will work flawlessly with quickloads, it's more likely that a quickload holder will do a better job since it's designed for quickloads.

Tri-X woops... how about Kodak TMX T-Max listed here, any good?? http://www.teamworkphoto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=12460

Bruce Watson
12-Jan-2009, 08:16
Tri-X woops... how about Kodak TMX T-Max listed here, any good?? http://www.teamworkphoto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=12460

The Tmax films may be the best B&W films ever made. But there are lots of excellent films out there. You'll get the same argument for Fuji Acros for example, which is available in quickloads.

Again, Kodak has discontinued all readyloads. When the current stocks are gone there won't be any more.

J D Clark
12-Jan-2009, 08:22
Anders,
In a pinch, Kodak Readyload holders can be used for Fuji Quickloads. You have to be careful, I put the Quickload in backwards once (in my effort to invent new ways to screw up a large format photo), with the "this side to lens" toward the ground glass, and I couldn't get the Quickload out without taking the holder apart -- this didn't work "in the field" because I couldn't get the holder back together again without consulting Tom Westbrook's instructions on field-stripping a Readyload holder.

Polaroid 545 holders will also work with Quickloads, but if you don't have any of those holders, getting an authentic Quickload holder would be the best recommendation.

John Clark
www.johndclark.com

Kuzano
12-Jan-2009, 09:09
The latest Readyload (big red release button) has a spring loaded pressure plate and graflok slots in the sides and works well with Quickloads in my experience. Kodak had a lot of false starts until they made the last version, but the Quickload holders have always been much preferred over the Readyloads. When I bought my Readyload, Quickload holders were almost impossible to buy new and very expensive used.

I had heard good things about the Kodak Professional Readyload and found one for a good price ($90) almost new. No problems with it using Fuji. I had always read that the I and II versions were chronically bad for light leaks and lack of film flatness.

Jim Becia
12-Jan-2009, 10:31
I have been using a Kodak readyload holder for years and use both quickloads and readyloads without one problem. My understanding is to make sure that the readyload holder has a black pressure plate. I have three of these and not one has ever given me a problem. On top of that, they are lighter than the quickolad holder. Granted, now readyload film is gone, quickload holders make sense, but I still use my readyload holders with quickload film without any problems whatsoever. Jim

Gordon Moat
12-Jan-2009, 15:08
The Kodak Readyload holder version IIII and the latest, both with stock black pressure plate, will work with Fuji Quickload films. However, you will need to be slower and more deliberate using them that way, and as JD Clark noted, you risk jambing the holder. It is far better to get a Fuji Quickload holder for Quickload films. If you do end up with a Readyload and a Quickload holder, then one can be a back-up for use with the other brand film; in other words mix film and holders only when you have no other choice.

Polaroid was creating the packets for Kodak Readyload films. Now that equipment is no longer running, the current stock of Kodak Readyload will be the last run. I would image film in Readyloads that is not outdated should be around another couple years. However, I would suggest getting more use to Fuji Quickloads, if you enjoy packet systems. While the Kodak and Fuji choices are not directly comparable, there are similar choices, except in the case of Kodak E100VS. Luckily Kodak makes E100VS in regular boxed 4x5 sizes, so I have prepared for the future by picking up some normal double darks Linhof 4x5 holders.

Ciao!

Gordon Moat Photography (http://www.gordonmoat.com)

Kuzano
12-Jan-2009, 16:34
However, you will need to be slower and more deliberate using them that way, and as JD Clark noted, you risk jambing the holder.
Gordon Moat Photography (http://www.gordonmoat.com)

Gordon... I'm 65... everything I do is slow and deliberate. Fast and rambunctious left my style some time ago. Almost every move I make has a risk of jamming something. Bran... lots of bran.

Still watching for the continuing developments of the Polaroid like 4X5 handheld.