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h2oman
26-Mar-2008, 17:44
OK, so what little doo-dads do all of you out there have that enable you get better photos? Things that are not specifically camera gear. For example, my current favorite is a pair of 21st century hip waders. Not big clunky rubber things, were' talking Gore-tex legs, neoprene ankles and rubber feet. Pretty darn light and go on in seconds. Warm even when standing in water that has ice on some parts of it.

What are YOUR secret weapons? Time to share!

Scott Kathe
26-Mar-2008, 18:26
That's easy, when it's really cold out here in the northeast the chemical heat packs are a great. Due to poor circulation my fingers get very cold very quickly and the little packets have really helped me out.

Scott

Gordon Moat
26-Mar-2008, 20:25
Really cool business cards. A good handshake, and a nice smile.
:D
:cool:

Ciao!

Gordon Moat Photography (http://www.gordonmoat.com)

BarryS
26-Mar-2008, 20:38
1) Good shoes. Don't laugh, but I've seen the mighty brought down by crappy footwear. If you're walking/hiking with a full load of gear, high quality boots or shoes will make a huge difference. I like Lowa, and Merrill boots, and Keen Bronx shoes--all indestructable and comfortable.

2) Small microfiber pack towel. Douglas Adams was right--travel anywhere in the known universe, but always bring a towel.

3) Gaffer's tape--feel naked without the stuff.

Rory_5244
26-Mar-2008, 20:44
You hit the nail on the head regarding boots, Barry. I've been sent airborne twice on slippery surfaces thanks to a garbage boot.

Brian Vuillemenot
26-Mar-2008, 20:47
My little yellow Garmin GPS unit so I can mark the location of backcountry photo sites and find them in the dark before sunrise, as well as find my way back to the car after it gets dark at night. A good head lamp is also essential when hiking in the dark to or from a photo site. I also like those little chemically activated heat packets for keeping hands warm on cold winter mornings- ah, so many fond memories!

Andrew O'Neill
26-Mar-2008, 20:57
A really nice buxom blond female companion...

to keep whispering in my ear when I'm out photographing "ooh, you're such a great photographer and when you're all finished under that hot and sweaty dark cloth thingy, I'll..."

okay, doesn't have to be blond.

Seriously, I love my little digital clip on metronome.

Darren Kruger
26-Mar-2008, 21:58
Gloves for the time when I'm up at sunrise and it is below freezing out. I use some fishing gloves where I can pull back the forefinger and thumb to adjust my camera.

-Darren

Martin K
26-Mar-2008, 22:02
Good boots oh yes. And a Garmin GPS. I tend to wonder around with my eye on the horizon, garmin takes me home. The best is my wife with an MSR multi fuel stove, she makes tea as we wait and watch the light change, bliss in my world.

David A. Goldfarb
26-Mar-2008, 22:11
Suunto Tandem Clinometer-Compass. It's perfect for aligning and adjusting any floppy camera (which is my main use for it), and if you use the Rodenstock calculator or similar methods you can use it to find the angle of the plane of focus and to measure the swing and tilt angles on the camera.

lenser
26-Mar-2008, 22:12
Set of drawers I built for the back of my Explorer. Three deep drawers wide with a large flat top that fits across the wheel wells and is carpeted to match the interior. I can fit everything I need for major trips with tripods lying on the floor in front of the drawers. Thats 5 cameras (4x5, medium and 35mm), many lenses and film holders plus tons of accessories. Only when I take lights and luggage do I have to pack anything out of the drawers.

Tim

Hiro
26-Mar-2008, 22:13
A pair of cargo pants with lots of pockets including one(s) big enough to fit a couple of holders and an extra lens. Convertible is a plus. And I prefer brunette.

John Kasaian
26-Mar-2008, 22:18
Old books on esoteric subjects, for inspiration

A thermos of coffee and a sandwich, because these things can take some time.

A miniature bottle of peppermint schnapps to freshen the breath, should I invite someone under the dark cloth with me to show them how glorious the world can be when observed through a ground glass.

butterfly
27-Mar-2008, 03:45
Good hat, good boots, Goretex waterproof trousers. A compass and little card that calculates sunset, sunrise direction..

Once
27-Mar-2008, 04:06
The electronic compass in my car, showing me all the time in which geographical position I'm heading. Very useful for the mental planning of views for photography. Knowing where you are and where the sun is/will be means knowing what is the good time to return to take pics. Also, being constantly aware of the North/South coordination brings a new dimension into your nature awareness.

Struan Gray
27-Mar-2008, 05:00
Dunlop wellies, a silk headover, and Bendick's Bittermints.

Colin Graham
27-Mar-2008, 05:27
A good whiskey and hot tub after a day out in the rain.

Hugo Zhang
27-Mar-2008, 05:52
A pair of goggle and Speedo...

Scott Kathe
27-Mar-2008, 05:58
My little yellow Garmin GPS unit so I can mark the location of backcountry photo sites and find them in the dark before sunrise, as well as find my way back to the car after it gets dark at night.

I've got the Garmin eTrex Venture HC and besides the GPS factor it tells me the times for sunrise/sunset and moonrise/moonset. If only it gave me a bearing for those events it would be perfect;)

Scott

Ted Harris
27-Mar-2008, 06:01
Pocket bubble level

vann webb
27-Mar-2008, 06:54
DeLorme Atlases. Best out there, IMO.
Silva Ranger Compass
4WD pickup truck

Richard Wasserman
27-Mar-2008, 07:40
A length of small diameter nylon cord. Useful for many things, in addition to tying back errant tree branches so they are out of the way.

Struan Gray
27-Mar-2008, 08:14
A good whiskey.....

No such thing :-)

Preston
27-Mar-2008, 09:32
Here's another vote for hand warmers. When hiking I like to use poles; saves the knees from a beating when going downhill with my camera pack, and aids balance, too.

-PB

Colin Graham
27-Mar-2008, 18:51
No such thing :-)

Is my yokel showing? Oh dear.

Colin Graham
27-Mar-2008, 21:19
Ah, of course. There's no e in scotch... I've never been a big whisky drinker, obviously!

Struan Gray
28-Mar-2008, 00:38
It's never too late to start....

Robert A. Zeichner
28-Mar-2008, 04:12
A machinist's inspection mirror. These are great for checking lens apertures and shutter speeds when you are on a ledge or somewhere similar where you can't step out in front of the camera. It will also enable you to confirm that the shutter is closed after you've loaded a holder, but before you pull the slide.

David A. Goldfarb
28-Mar-2008, 05:13
A machinist's inspection mirror. These are great for checking lens apertures and shutter speeds when you are on a ledge or somewhere similar where you can't step out in front of the camera. It will also enable you to confirm that the shutter is closed after you've loaded a holder, but before you pull the slide.

That's a great idea! I have one, and it's never occurred to me to use it for that purpose.

scrichton
28-Mar-2008, 06:06
cigarettes and coffee. Keep me warm awake and occupied :)

Oh and my iPod for long time wasting

Maretzo
28-Mar-2008, 06:22
My laptop, to read the LF forum and buy lenses from ebay and Keh.com :D

Ah, this is photo gear! Sorry!:o

lenser
28-Mar-2008, 08:13
A very small goose neck led flashlight from the sporting goods section at Walmart and in some hardware stores. Very useful for setting speeds and f stops when the camera is either in a darkened area or set too high on the tripod and the scales are in harsh shadow. It has a pocket clip that can actually attach to the bellows for hands free use.

Tim

John Powers
28-Mar-2008, 08:42
The electronic compass in my car, showing me all the time in which geographical position I'm heading. Very useful for the mental planning of views for photography. Knowing where you are and where the sun is/will be means knowing what is the good time to return to take pics. Also, being constantly aware of the North/South coordination brings a new dimension into your nature awareness.

Is there one of these you recommend? The cheap ones at auto parts stores seem to die after a short time. Mine is currently reading north regardless of where the car is pointing.

John

John Powers
28-Mar-2008, 08:59
Portable weather radio in the glove box of an SUV.

Performance baby jogger with 20” bicycle wheels and 100 pound shock absorbers allowing a 68 year old to carry a 7x17 on big Ries tripod with a bag of lenses and six film holders. On Cuyahoga National Park trails this gives me about a two mile range out from the SUV. http://babyjogger.com/performancesingle.htm

John

Hollis
28-Mar-2008, 19:13
I use a small travel bag from eagle creek. It is large enough to fit a polaroid back, some film (pola.), holders (non pola), my loupe and light meter. Otherwise I strat fumbling around and look stupid (slightly more so than my fancy fanny pack but oh well).

Kirk Gittings
28-Mar-2008, 19:59
I use a small travel bag from eagle creek. It is large enough to fit a polaroid back, some film (pola.), holders (non pola), my loupe and light meter. Otherwise I strat fumbling around and look stupid (slightly more so than my fancy fanny pack but oh well).

Same goes for the reel cases from Orvis or Fishpond. I use three for various odds and ends to back up my camera case, extra readyload holder, extra film, air can, lenses like a macro that I don't use often, extra ground glass, extra shutter release, lens nut wrench etc.

Tom Conway
29-Mar-2008, 07:38
An old-fashioned thermos with either coffee or soup. Didn't some one say "A full-bellied photographer is a more creative photographer."

jenn wilson
29-Mar-2008, 23:23
ipod - gotta have it (music, audiobooks and a stopwatch all in one!)
neoprene booties
towels
extra socks - nothin' worse than wet, sandy socks

jnanian
30-Mar-2008, 07:46
a small step stool

David Karp
30-Mar-2008, 08:23
A machinist's inspection mirror. These are great for checking lens apertures and shutter speeds when you are on a ledge or somewhere similar where you can't step out in front of the camera. It will also enable you to confirm that the shutter is closed after you've loaded a holder, but before you pull the slide.

An even less expensive option to get a similar benefit is a cheap plastic dental mirror available at many drugstores. Pros: cheaper and lighter. Cons: Smaller mirror.

Frank Petronio
30-Mar-2008, 09:32
I've been buying lots of Patagonia Silkweight Capilene T-shirts lately, mostly black ones.

They really do transport your sweat off your body and keep your "climate control" in good shape. They're smooth and look good, easy to layer and move around in. And in the hot weather or under hot tungsten lights they keep me feeling and looking better. It's not cool to sweat on your subjects.

darr
30-Mar-2008, 12:03
I got a Rockler Cloth Tool Bag for $9.00 as a promotion and fill it with lightmeter, polaroid back, QL back and film, Lee hood, reflex viewer (when needed), and more. I place it near my tripod and leave it open and reach in and pull out what I need. Very handy and roomy.

http://images.rockler.com/rockler/images/53709-02-200.jpg

I also use a step stool -- one that someone made for my son when he was a toddler. It has his initials painted on it. Now that my son is 20, he laughs when he sees me "still" carrying it around. :)

Jorge Gasteazoro
30-Mar-2008, 12:34
Flash light.

Ed Richards
30-Mar-2008, 13:57
An old Zone VI apron with an extra pouch and filter holder. Holds my light meter, focusing loop, high intensity LED flashlight, folding tactical knife (for scene management), waterproof note pad, space pen, 6 4x5 holders, and my basic filters. All I need to do to shoot is grab the camera, put it on the tripod, and put on the apron. Before I started doing this, I frequently forgot at least one critical part and did not notice until I was a mile from the car and set up to shoot.

I would use one of those dorkwear photogs vests, but it is too hot around here. (One more tip for the heat - nylon tropical fishing clothes with lots of pockets.)

Frank Petronio
30-Mar-2008, 14:23
Just wondering and asking in the most tactful way possible Ed ;-)... But how is an apron more or less dorky than a vest?

David A. Goldfarb
30-Mar-2008, 15:15
In the apparel realm, I like Ex Officio safari-style shirts. They're cool and UV protective and well ventilated, and they have 2 pockets large enough for a 4x5" Grafmatic. I wouldn't keep filmholders in my shirt pockets for a long period of time, but when you need someplace to put one quickly or your meter or loupe, they're handy. You can also wash them in a hotel sink while you're traveling and they'll dry in about an hour.

Ed Richards
30-Mar-2008, 15:28
Frank,

It is not a bit less dorky, it is just cooler in the thermal, rather than fashion, sense. (It is just a belt with big pockets.) But for serious dorkage, I have some genuine pocket protectors from the bioengineering meetings I once attended and I think I still have a slide rule holster.:-)

Scott Rosenberg
30-Mar-2008, 15:32
waterproof boots (i prefer Reichle), serius gloves for when it's really cold, nike thermal compression gear (excellent cold weather base-layer), insulated ski pants (i've only recently discovered how useful these are when shooting), digital timer in the shape of a carabineer, led headlamp (came in VERY handy last weekend), really good hiking socks (i prefer ingenious w/stitched in liners), superfeet insoles (i prefer the green ones), a pack that FITS (generally means one that will allow you to specify the torso length and belt length independently), hat with built in mosquito netting (will become more important in about 4 months)...

Scott Rosenberg
30-Mar-2008, 15:42
oh, a friend of mine has a nifty focal length estimator tool... basically a frame on a string with knots to set the distance from your eye that approximates the various focal lengths in his kit. very simple, and very effective.

Sheldon N
30-Mar-2008, 15:57
Thanks for the plug Scott.

I would have patented it, but apparently coat hanger wire bent into a 4x5 rectangle and a piece of string with knots tied into it doesn't exactly constitute an original invention. :)

Sure beats setting up the camera and figuring out that you're standing in the wrong place or that you've pulled out the wrong lens.

I'll second Scott's recommendation for a LED headlamp. I've got one on my "must have" list after our post sunset 4 mile hike in the dark with just one lamp between the two of us.

Scott Rosenberg
30-Mar-2008, 16:16
oh, come on sheldon, there's a whole heap of patents out there for things FAR more useless than your hanger-string-framing tool, which is actually remarkably USEFUL in the field... http://www.freepatentsonline.com/crazy.html

that hike would have been a lot easier had there been ANY moonlight and had we not been in the forest!! definately one of my more memorable recent hikes...

Ben Chase
30-Mar-2008, 18:30
Thanks for the plug Scott.

I'll second Scott's recommendation for a LED headlamp. I've got one on my "must have" list after our post sunset 4 mile hike in the dark with just one lamp between the two of us.

I think this has happened to me like 4 times. Now I carry 2 headlamps, spare batteries, and a mag light. It's even worse when there is clouds - this happened to me in Glacier last year. I hiked the Hidden Lake trail totally in the dark, which isn't that big of a deal except for the group of about 9 bighorn sheep that were in my way....

Aside from that - my favorite non-photo gear would probably be a one-quart thermos full of hot tea or coffee.

h2oman
30-Mar-2008, 19:03
Well, I got more than I bargained for - lots of doo-dads I need to seek out. Scott and Sheldon, why don't you guys come south sometime? I like the stuff at both of your web pages. As a novice LF shooter, I'd love to go out with some experienced folk. I'm not averse to a bit of hiking - yesterday I skiied two or three miles and up 1500 vertical feet with my 4x5 at Crater Lake. On the way up I was thinking this was really stupid. Then I had to take off my skis and hassle with all that gear. Yuk! But the first look in the ground glass and it was all worth it!

Jim Jones
30-Mar-2008, 19:29
For many decades the Vise Grip might not have been the right tool for anything on Earth, but it is best wrong tool for thousands of uses. Modern multi-tools like the Leatherman are even more versatile.

Alan Davenport
31-Mar-2008, 18:54
My best "non-photo" bit of photo gear has to be my hiking boots. They help convince me that it won't hurt too much to get off my dead @$$ and hit the trail in search of photons to capture.

Kirk Keyes
31-Mar-2008, 22:11
I'll recommend the two LED headlamps. Some of them are so small they weigh only one ounce.

I also suggest a GPS, a compass, and TOPO! or Nationial Geographic mapping software. And of course, knowing how to use them.

Also, some astronomy/planetarium software, something like Distant Suns or Cartes du Ciel. Also, Heavenly Opportunity for helping plan sunrises/sets and moonrise/sets and locations.

Oh, and a Jeep Grand Cherokee.

Scott, Sheldon - where'd y'all go? And I think I can make a trip east of the Cascades with you guys this year if you're interested.

evan clarke
1-Apr-2008, 03:46
Katoolah Micro Spikes, good walking traction on all surfaces, ice, snow, loose gravelly earth, you name it...EC

evan clarke
1-Apr-2008, 05:41
More favorites: My AltitechII, it's a watch, compass, timer, altimeter and barometer http://www.rei.com/product/707270?vcat=REI_SSHP_GPS_TOC . I carry a set of jeweler's screwdrivers in my pack and carry a Leatherman on my belt. I have a large grip's screwdriver in my pack which always gets used. I have a tiny first aid kit in all my packs, these also get used. Everybody I photograph with seems to be a little amused that I carry all this stuff but they all seem to need some of it at times. I have at least one full set of appropriate batteries in each pack, 2 AAs for miscellaneous use, 1 9v transistor battery for my meters and other devices and 1 little hearing aid battery for my Altitech in each pack. When travelling, I have at least 1 full spare of everything (sometimes 2 or 3). In the car I carry a camping stove, an electric rice cooker, water, rice, Ramen noodles, coffee, some chocolate bars, a DC to AC converter, chemical handwarmers, snowshoes, a couple different sets of ice cleats, 1 change of clothing with hats gloves, a good first aid kit, jumper cables, tow strap (newly added, don't laugh I could have used this last month and it was only $20). All this stuff now lives in 4 cheap gym bags and I can grab the particular bag and throw it in the car, I actually just leave it all in there most of the time. This sounds crazy but I am usually prepared for anything!!..EC

Sheldon N
1-Apr-2008, 11:22
Scott, Sheldon - where'd y'all go? And I think I can make a trip east of the Cascades with you guys this year if you're interested.

We did a "day" trip to Shi Shi beach on the North Olympic coast. Left my place at 7am, stopped at La Push/Second Beach for an hour or so, then drove around the point through Neah Bay and made it to the trailhead at Shi Shi by 4:30pm, pretty much driving straight there. Hiked in 4 miles - only one mile of trail, then one mile of pure MUD, then two miles on sand. Shot sunset and headed back to the car starting at about 8pm, got to the car at 10:30pm, then drove straight home. Pulled into my driveway at 5am.

Next time at Shi Shi it will definitely be camping.

:)

joolsb
1-Apr-2008, 12:21
My fingerless gloves, headlamp and two sturdy hiking poles. The poles are particularly useful for spreading the load of a heavy pack as well as for balance in tricky terrain. I wouldn't hike any significant distance without them.

Colin Graham
2-Apr-2008, 05:46
Shi Shi/ Point of the Arches is definitely worth an overnighter or two. Low tides there are the fabled bee's knees.

Sheldon N
2-Apr-2008, 14:36
Yes, low tide is very cool out there. The first picture on my Flickr account is from my recent trip, which was at a very low tide.

The image that spawned my interest of the place was one by Marc Adamus, taken just 50 yards from where I was shooting. I tried to do something with those fins, but they are very dependent on the season of year and the tide. Prop's to Adamus for figuring out exactly when to be there and seeing this composition.

http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6975358

Aahx
3-Apr-2008, 13:50
My Snowshoes, Kayak, and drybags. To get myself and gear off the the trails and to places less traveled.

Keith Pitman
3-Apr-2008, 19:57
Glove liners - keep the chill off your fingers, but with enough tactile sensitivity to operate all the lens and camera controls. If it's really cold, I use mitts over the glove liners between set-ups.

Keith Pitman
3-Apr-2008, 20:26
Bigfoot gets us to some good places.

Shen45
3-Apr-2008, 23:59
My 3 tier all grain brew set up. Always have some friends around for a beer and of course a discussion on photography.

Scott Kathe
5-Apr-2008, 12:21
Let me add one more winter item to the list. I just got back from walking around on the last of the ice on the trails near my house-I hope. These trails were a sheet of ice in some spots and I wouldn't have even tried it without stableicers a type of metal studded vibrum sole that straps onto the bottom of boots.

Scott

Chris Strobel
5-Apr-2008, 12:42
My Jeep Cherokee for getting there, and my large bottle of dustoff in the back :D

http://www.pbase.com/cloudswimmer/image/93285409/original.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/cloudswimmer/image/93612497/original.jpg

robert amsden
5-Apr-2008, 20:14
How about a 38 special revolver for protection.

Kirk Keyes
6-Apr-2008, 13:12
Chris - that's one bad-assed Jeep!

Frank Petronio
6-Apr-2008, 13:16
If you're going to do 4x4ing, that is the way to do it, sweet

Chris Strobel
6-Apr-2008, 14:59
Chris - that's one bad-assed Jeep!

Thanks, I'm saving up for some gasoline, then it will be complete :D

Clement Apffel
7-Apr-2008, 01:04
As scott and sheldon mentioned,
two cardboard 4x5" frame.
to "simulate" my 150mm and 90mm lenses.
and a notebook.

The day before shooting, without the camera, they allow me to spot the location, the height of the point of view I need.
I also decide at what exact time I'll shoot to get the best sun / light / shadow configuration for that frame.

I rarely shoot a picture without having it drawn and spotted before.
it saves me a lot of time and energy, and it enhance the final picture.

and also, of course, I like this patient and meticulous way of taking photographs.


I'll add as my favorite non-photo gear, my aluminium step-ladder for high point of views.

but of course, i'm not a hiking LF photographer ;) .

tombob
12-Apr-2008, 01:45
fingerless gloves, and a monopod incase someone trys to rob me of my cameras

John Brady
12-Apr-2008, 04:42
This Gheenoe is the ultimate Florida outback tool. It gets me into some crazy places.

Colin Graham
12-Apr-2008, 08:56
Golf umbrella, if no one has mentioned it already. I finally picked up one this week and don't know how I ever managed without it. Keeps rain off glass, deflects winds, and augments my toddle considerably.

Marko
12-Apr-2008, 09:20
I'm really surprised that nobody mentioned a hat so far! I prefer boonie hats, wide enough to provide good shade and keep the darkcloth from knocking the glasses off, but also easy to fold and pack.

I've heard good things about Tilley hats too, but never owned one myself.

mdd99
12-Apr-2008, 15:10
A mini light I can wear on my finger; scarf; Tilley hat, BuzzOff hat, shirt, pants, socks; Swiss army knife; Lasik surgery; patience.

Scott Rosenberg
11-May-2008, 20:19
i'm so thrilled that i just had to post in this thread... i'm tall and thin - 32" waist & 36" leg - so buying pants is a bit of a challenge. even regular pants is difficult, but specialty pants, like good hiking pants - forget about it, they simply aren't made in my size. WELL, a friend suggested i try cabellas, as they will custom hem most of their pants to any length short of 38". i ordered some of their cargo pants - fleece lined and traditional, and they are great. if you're tall, you might want to check them out. Nice deep pockets for things like light meters and loupes, and the fit is perfect.

Greg Miller
12-May-2008, 08:10
A credit card; to scrape the frost off my ground glass after I accidentally breath on it on really cold days...

Ben Chase
12-May-2008, 12:53
Arcteryx Theta rain parka in black. Doubles as a nice darkcloth in addition to being one of the best rain parkas made.

Michael Wynd
12-May-2008, 21:37
A petzl headlamp for when you're carrying all your gear back from a shot after dark out in the bush
Mike

Kirk Gittings
12-May-2008, 23:02
Chopin, Nocturne in C minor.

John Z.
16-May-2008, 09:07
One item no one has mentioned I carry is a knee pad; the type that gardeners use to cusion there knees when kneeling down. For lower shots it helps when kneeling before the ground glass, and keeps my knees from getting scraped up-very handy and light weight.

paulr
16-May-2008, 10:42
carbon fiber ice tools, by black diamond ...

http://www.spadout.com/images/products/s/334.jpg

medieval weaponry so sweet you want to take them to bed.

(and a bottle of whisky, no e. but i've had some pretty good ones with an e, too. try not to think less of me, Struan).

Struan Gray
19-May-2008, 00:28
The booze I can forgive. But that ice axe is just a toy. What's wrong with an iron-shod staff? If it worked for Whymper it's good enough for me :-)


And I still vote for my wellies. When I'm dug out of the blanket peat in 2000 years' time, they'll still be usable for the lucky finder.

Preston
25-May-2008, 11:43
"carbon fiber ice tools, by black diamond ...
medieval weaponry so sweet you want to take them to bed."

I still use my 70's vintage Chouinard/Frost piolet and Chouinard crampons every once in a while: Classic beauty and rugged functionality!

-PB

Texian
25-May-2008, 19:37
2000 Jeep TJ, takes me everywhere. :D

domenico Foschi
26-May-2008, 01:28
pasta with garbanzo beans, garlic, rosemary and bacon.
Slurp. delicious!

Joseph O'Neil
26-May-2008, 04:40
I just changed my mind, as of this past weekend. I spent $200 on new parts and a Saturday afternoon rebuilding my bicycle - new tires, handlebars, etc, etc.

I figured while $200 was a lot of coin, it is still only - what, 2 or 3 fill ups at the gas pump? With my 4x5 in my backpack, and my tripod on my rear carrier, it will not take many trips on my bike to recover that $200 in gas I would of spent.

So my bike is now my favourite, new accessory.
:)

joe

Kirk Gittings
26-May-2008, 07:54
ibuprofen!

Ralph Barker
26-May-2008, 08:09
Frozen gel packs to go with the Ibuprofen. ;)

butterflydream
26-May-2008, 08:42
My wife.

shmoo
28-May-2008, 19:27
artist's tape and a Sharpie...to remind me of what I shot.

paulr
28-May-2008, 19:38
" still use my 70's vintage Chouinard/Frost piolet and Chouinard crampons every once in a while: Classic beauty and rugged functionality!

-PB

those are beautiful. i have one from1986 ... not wood, not as pretty, and it weighs a ton, but it has that classic, go-anywhere, do-anything appeal.

Colin Graham
29-May-2008, 05:41
Frozen gel packs to go with the Ibuprofen. ;)

Those gel packs are great. Glucosamine seems like it's finally working a little. Of course I'm just off a regimen of muscle relaxers and prednisone from back problems so it's more likely just a little pharmanostalgia. ;-)

Frank Petronio
29-May-2008, 05:51
Hanging in the garage I have one of those ugly blue Forrest Mountaineering ones from the early 80s, for those of us who couldn't afford the Chouinard.

It still has all the blood and gristle from my last murder dried on it.

George Stewart
29-May-2008, 06:20
It depends on the environment:
City - S&W 340PD;
Country - Bowtech Guardian and the Smith as backup; and,
Alaska/Africa - as really big medicine, a .375 H&H.

paulr
29-May-2008, 09:53
It still has all the blood and gristle from my last murder dried on it.

here's some fresh from my last suicide attempt.

http://www.paulraphaelson.com/downloads/bloodybastard.jpg

Ben Chase
29-May-2008, 19:18
here's some fresh from my last suicide attempt.



Ouch - looks like you ate your ice axe. How did it taste? :)