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uniB
4-Jan-2008, 04:48
I'm getting a bit fed up of my filters, GG and contents of my bag getting covered in rain when I'm out (a common problem in the UK!) and my thoughts have turned to umbrellas.
I'm sure I've seen a picture somewhere of a set up where an umbrella is attached to the tripod somehow, but I'd imagine that's not going to help with camera shake at all, my tripod is on the edge of being too light for LF anyway so a small sail probably won't help!

So I was wondering if anyone here has any alternative set ups? I was considering a fishing umbrella, anyone use one of those? Or any other ideas?

The solution needs to be as light as possible 'cause it'll need to strap to my backpack.

And is it possible to say 'umbrella' without saying 'ella, ella' afterwards?!?

Thanks for any ideas

Robert A. Zeichner
4-Jan-2008, 05:34
I've seen hats that incorporate an umbrella of sorts, but that might be a bit cumbersome while focusing and such. Another thought is to pack a very lightweight light stand to which an umbrella could be attached. One idea I've considered in the past is to buy one of those phone booth sized collapsable hunting blinds. You could set up in an entirely rainproof enclosure with one of those. I'm not certain of how compact they fold, but it might be worth whatever extra weight they add to have total protection. Take a look at this:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/271433-REG/Petrol_PFT_DG_Flex_Tent_Dark_Green.html

As to your last question, I suppose you could just say bumbershoot!

lenser
4-Jan-2008, 05:45
Would a clear plastic painter's drop cloth work? Here in the states at Walmart you get them quite large for only a couple of dollars and they can be cut down to whatever size you might wish to carry. While they aren't as tough as mylar, they do stand up well to walking on while painting. They are also available in a couple of thicknesses.

You might even make detachable wire frames to fit on the front and back standards of your camera to keep the plastic above your working areas and attach those with basic office clips. Another sheet with weighted corners could lay over your bag to keep contents relatively dry and not be too likely to go sailing off in the breeze.

David_Senesac
4-Jan-2008, 15:27
http://davidsenesac.com/_a-z_evad/wisner_bag.jpg

I don't let minor precip keep me from working in the field. I have some thick 4 mil polyethelene bags I used to store medium sized prints in that works well with my camera atop the big Gitzo. Lightweight plastic bags tend to be awkward, especially in the wind while 4 mil behaves and is durable. In the above pic taken at El Capitan Meadow last year, one will note a thin red something hanging down below that bag. Its one of those mini-bunji cords with a piece of duct tape in the middle taping it to the bottom edge of that bag. Thus I can easily wrap it around a tripod leg to keep the wind from moving it about. When I take it off after say it has gotten wet, it goes into an open bag externally attached to my big camera daypack. Thus is ready at hand to put on and store while not getting the rest of my gear wet. I also have some compact sheets of synthetic chamois useful for drying things off. One of the 4x5 pics I nailed last winter while playing this game taking the bag on and off as snow showers came and went was this pic below of El Capitan:

http://www.davidsenesac.com/slideshows/Upcoming/el_cap_boiling.jpg

Colin Graham
4-Jan-2008, 19:02
Ebony's (http://www.ebonycamera.com/acc.html#Lens%20shade%20clip) (scroll down) lens shade clip and all weather hood looks pretty functional, was thinking about making something similar. As it stands I use a compendium to keep rain drops off the lens, and just dry everything off when I get indoors.

Jim Jones
4-Jan-2008, 20:31
Cut the corner off of a large garbage bag, stick a lens hood through the opening, and hold them together with a rubber band or duct tape. You'll also want something to plug the lens hood opening while waiting for a shot in driving rain.

Ron McElroy
4-Jan-2008, 20:40
Great image of El Capitan David. I like clouds dancing around the peak.

Stephen Willard
4-Jan-2008, 23:17
I have come to realize shooting in hostile weather can produce some amazing light and images. I have tried everything imaginable over the years, and I have found only one solution that really works. It is the Ebony AW Focusing Hood which also requires purchasing the Ebony Lens Shade Clip. If you do not have an Ebony like me then you will have to purchase there hotshoe and attach it to the top of your front standard. The package will set you back around $275, but judging from the photographs I have been taking lately it is worth twice that. The package is a lot lighter than an umbrella, and it will also keep your camera and film cool when shooting in hot blazing sun. The hood covers the camera, you, the lens, filters, and any lens hood used and keeps them dry when the rains come. I love it, but unfortunately, it an't cheap.

Good luck.

rippo
4-Jan-2008, 23:35
holy crap, david! what an awesome picture. single-handedly making me think there's hope for color landscape photography. and yosemite to boot.

Gene McCluney
5-Jan-2008, 02:07
I'm getting a bit fed up of my filters, GG and contents of my bag getting covered in rain when I'm out (a common problem in the UK!) and my thoughts have turned to umbrellas.
I'm sure I've seen a picture somewhere of a set up where an umbrella is attached to the tripod somehow, but I'd imagine that's not going to help with camera shake at all, my tripod is on the edge of being too light for LF anyway so a small sail probably won't help!

So I was wondering if anyone here has any alternative set ups? I was considering a fishing umbrella, anyone use one of those? Or any other ideas?

The solution needs to be as light as possible 'cause it'll need to strap to my backpack.

And is it possible to say 'umbrella' without saying 'ella, ella' afterwards?!?

Thanks for any ideas

Yes, of course you need an umbrella, a large one, but equally important you need a teenage son, who is interested in photography to hold it for you, and also hand you a film holder when requested. This makes photography so much easier.
This has a side effect of lightening your backpack, as you get teenage son to carry your backpack, thus making it extremely light on your shoulders.

jetcode
5-Jan-2008, 11:10
well this will sound cheesy but it's really practical for local easy access photography

I have a VW Westfalia with a nice cargo door and when I can line up a scenic from the cargo door I have essentially a small well protected living room complete with fridge and stove to work from. The wind may be howling and it may be raining buckets outside but everything is dry inside.

Jorge Gasteazoro
5-Jan-2008, 11:31
I have the focusing hood, I just turn it inside out over the camera and wroks well. As to the Ebony clip, you might want to visit these guys http://www.tripodhead.com/products/plamp-main.cfm
Much cheaper than the Ebony, no need for a flash shoe and they work great....

uniB
6-Jan-2008, 16:34
Thanks for all the great information and ideas, I like the look of the Plamp, can see one or two of those being very useful and I can get them OK in UK. Wonder if you could use one with a small (child's?) umbrella?

I've also got a VW camper jetcode, I love the idea of setting up next to the kettle but I can rarely find the perfect spot where I can just open the door and set up.

Keith S. Walklet
7-Jan-2008, 07:41
There is an accessory manufacturer that makes a small umbrella very similar to a golf-bag unbrella for tripods, but I am personally hesitant to attach anything to my tripod that would catch the wind, as I've had two tripods blow over without any extras attached.

BTW David, nice image of El Capitan. I particularly like the way the cloud splay echoes the branches of the snowy branches of the tree.

SamReeves
7-Jan-2008, 10:58
http://davidsenesac.com/_a-z_evad/wisner_bag.jpg

I don't let minor precip keep me from working in the field. I have some thick 4 mil polyethelene bags I used to store medium sized prints in that works well with my camera atop the big Gitzo. Lightweight plastic bags tend to be awkward, especially in the wind while 4 mil behaves and is durable. In the above pic taken at El Capitan Meadow last year, one will note a thin red something hanging down below that bag. Its one of those mini-bunji cords with a piece of duct tape in the middle taping it to the bottom edge of that bag. Thus I can easily wrap it around a tripod leg to keep the wind from moving it about. When I take it off after say it has gotten wet, it goes into an open bag externally attached to my big camera daypack. Thus is ready at hand to put on and store while not getting the rest of my gear wet. I also have some compact sheets of synthetic chamois useful for drying things off. One of the 4x5 pics I nailed last winter while playing this game taking the bag on and off as snow showers came and went was this pic below of El Capitan:

http://www.davidsenesac.com/slideshows/Upcoming/el_cap_boiling.jpg

Beauty! If it rains I'm usually hiding inside. :)

uniB
7-Jan-2008, 11:03
That really is a stunning photo isn't it?

Thanks for the recommendation for the tripod umbrella Keith, I did a search and found one on Ebay so ordered that, you've saved me from having to get a child's umbrella with random cartoon characters on it like I don't look odd enough when out with a sheet over my head in the middle of the moors as it is! :)

S'pose I'll only use it when it's not too windy.

Steve Gledhill
8-Jan-2008, 02:39
I never could cope with an umbrella plus 5x4, usually because its windy whilst its raining. My alternative works very well unless it's very heavy rain. I always carry a small towel (approx 15"x30") in my bag which I drape over the camera. It's easy to extend just a little over the lens and over the screen to keep the rain off them both. This doesn't stop the towel from getting wet but it does stop running water getting into/onto most of the camera. The towel soaks it up. And even when the towel is very wet the method still works as you just wring out the excess water and drape the towel again for the next image. It's not perfect but it works well enough and encourages me to photograph in the wet more that I would otherwise do.

uniB
8-Jan-2008, 04:57
Thanks for that suggestions Steve, sounds like a good idea, guess you could also use a Plamp to hold the towel away from the lens.

Just looking at your work on your website very stunning. :)

Former Member 8144
9-Jan-2008, 10:34
David,
Those 4 mil bags look great.
I've always just used one big hand held umbrella for both me and the camera but this is much more flexible.
Means the camera stays really dry in light showers with an umbrella (over the camera) keeping me dry, and it looks pretty quick to take off and shoot once the shot has previousely been set up.
Now to find one that does not come with 499 others!

The positive of the ebony cloth is it allows framing and focussing in the rain if need be. Just how much rain can it stand and still keep what's underneath it dry?

Jorge, does the Plamp have to be attached to the tripod as intended or can it attach to the front standard as its hard to see wether when attached to the tripod it would reach enough around the field of view to allow the shade/gg protector etc to be held high enough to use with the ebony cloth?

Marc

ljb0904
9-Jan-2008, 13:03
Marc, I wouldn't attach the plamp to the front standard, but to the the base of a folding camera or the rail of a monorail. It's a pretty strong clamp, and I'd be afraid of damaging bellows.

I know it looks silly, but I use one of these:
http://www.amazon.com/Radio-Flyer-UA18-Umbrella-Accessory/dp/B00002MZ8A

It's no Yosemite, but it let me take this image of a Saguaro and passing storm cell:
http://homepage.mac.com/mrljb/Galleries/WebDisplay/lf2007_062_02.jpg

Kirk Gittings
9-Jan-2008, 13:15
Oh my! Sweet.



http://www.davidsenesac.com/slideshows/Upcoming/el_cap_boiling.jpg[/QUOTE]

uniB
9-Jan-2008, 16:40
I know it looks silly, but I use one of these:
http://www.amazon.com/Radio-Flyer-UA18-Umbrella-Accessory/dp/B00002MZ8A


The Radio Flyer Umbrella looks ideal, just the sort of thing I was looking for, think I'll give one of those a go. :)

Got my Plamp through the post today, looks like a very useful device, expensive for what it is though.

Alan Davenport
10-Jan-2008, 00:59
I carry a couple of plastic trash bags and a folding umbrella in my camera bag. The trash bags give me a dry place to lay the pack and a temporary cover for the camera. The umbrella does double duty as a rain cover and a windbreak.

When things get too nasty for these modest protections, I head for a coffee shop or a pub.

lenser
11-Jan-2008, 16:52
I just spotted something called a Probrella in the Porter's Camera web site. It is item #100958. Maybe it will help.