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View Full Version : How to carry a Speed Graphic in a backpack



tylercooney
26-Dec-2007, 21:51
Any advice on carrying a speed graphic in a backpack? I was thinking a extra large lens wrap type thing. I want to keep weight and more importantly bulk to a minimum.

Thanks.

Vaughn
26-Dec-2007, 21:55
I would think a waterproof stuff sack (like sleeping bags are put in) would be plenty, as the Speed graphic is in its own case.

Vaughn

tylercooney
26-Dec-2007, 21:58
Great idea. I kind of wanted a minimal amount of padding just to protect against other things in the backpack, etc.

Kuzano
26-Dec-2007, 23:36
I tore down a pretty rough Graflex (not all metal like a Speed Graphic). Took out the focal plane shutter and all the hardware. Stripped off the leather covering and all the trim. ditched all the rangefinder stuff. Took off the metal on the back and replaced it with a Tachihara back (much lighter). Then I used a coping saw to cut out various shapes on the wood body that did not interfere with hardware mounting. I smoothed down all the edges. Came across a new OEM bellows on eBay for $20. With the Tachihara style back I could use Fuji Quickloads and Polaroid 545 backs, or standard dual holders. I sold that camera, but it was about half the weight of the original package.

I have gutted out another Crown body... all the hardware is out and the covering is removed. This time, I am thinking about mounting a Shen Hao back with the graflok slides. I will finish the body out a bit nicer this time. I may cut more of the wood out of the main body, and then put a thin veneer of either Teak or Black Walnut on the main body. The result will actually be lighter (my hope) than the last model I will also hinge the back at the bottom so there is some tilt on the back. This will work because the Bellows on the Graflex camera goes through the body and mounts to the back directly. That gives the camera front rise, front drop, swing, front tilt (enhanced) and rear tilt. Goal weight is 4 pounds or less.

I did a Busch Press model D with the metal body. I drilled and lightened the body and other hardware, leaving the stiffness in place and a final weight with the Raptar lens and shutter at 4 pounds. Sold it on eBay for as much as fairly nice Busch D's were bringing. Plus, it still had the revolving back.

Ole Tjugen
27-Dec-2007, 05:00
Great idea. I kind of wanted a minimal amount of padding just to protect against other things in the backpack, etc.

The only reason to pad a Speed Graphic would be to protect the other things in the backpack from the Speed Graphic, not the other way around. :)

mrladewig
27-Dec-2007, 10:29
If you are meaning to truly backpack and weight is an issue, the Tachihara is an excellent solution. It is a pretty light 4X5 camera. Otherwise, you might contact photobackpacker.com to see if they make a case that will hold the graphic. Their cases are very light molded foam.

Mel-

Glenn Thoreson
27-Dec-2007, 11:17
I wouldn't worry about damaging the Speed Graphic. I'd be more worried about it squishing my lunch.
All my Speeds and Crowns are in their cases. With what I have crammed in my favorite 4X5 kit, you would need a pack mule. A strong one. Have fun. It's a great camera.
Another thought - do you carry a changing bag in your pack? You might stuff your Speed in the bag. That would save a little space.

John Kasaian
2-Jan-2008, 20:17
The only reason to pad a Speed Graphic would be to protect the other things in the backpack from the Speed Graphic, not the other way around. :)

So true! FWIW my speeder rides in a Jansport Equinox day pack. Try not to include in your pack any fruit that will bruise because---it will!

Frank Petronio
2-Jan-2008, 22:50
You could also stand on the Speed Graphic to get a higher point of view for your digicam shots.

Seriously, throw it in a plastic bag for a little dust protection and forgetaboutit.

John Kasaian
3-Jan-2008, 12:54
Since speeders have made it to the top of Mt Suribachi in combat, I doubt if anything you could put in a day pack could harm it ;)

Alan Davenport
3-Jan-2008, 15:16
I got a smile from a couple of the answers here. I have to agree: a Speed Graphic doesn't need protection, so much as protection from. Unless, of course, you've got a hangar queen that hasn't ever been out in the world -- in which case, sell it to a collector and buy a lighter camera.