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BradS
2-Dec-2007, 22:57
So, I'm shopping for a bag for my 5x7 kit and am getting annoyed by all the pictures of photo bags with D-SLR and 35mm gear demonstrating what a bag can hold...I'd really like to see how people reconfigure the standard bags to hold their LF kit. I'll show you mine if you show me yours.



Lowepro Mini Trekker classic
Ebony RW45
90mm Angulon, 135mm Symmar-S and 210mm Geronar
Gossen Luna Pro SBC in the white cardboard box next to the camera.
filters, spare batteries and a cloth measuring tape in the interior pockets
notebook, pens, reading glasses (poor man's loupe) and dark cloth in outer pocket.

Aender Brepsom
2-Dec-2007, 23:35
Here is my 4x5 kit in a Tamrac Expedition 8.

(I prefer this rucksack to the LowePro Photo Trekker. I find it more versatile and it is more comfortable to carry. The size is approx. the same, but the Tamrac is less expensive.)

Frank Petronio
3-Dec-2007, 04:19
Where is the film?

Here is an old one:

Scott Knowles
3-Dec-2007, 07:15
I use a Lowe Pro AW, seen here (http://www.wsrphoto.com/lfblog11.html). In front of the camera and below the light meter and loupe are two Renaissance photo tech lens cases for 120mm, 150mm or 210mm lenses. The extra bag is for extra film holders which I only take only longer trips.

Daniel_Buck
3-Dec-2007, 08:50
I'd really like to see how people reconfigure the standard bags to hold their LF kit.

Mine is setup pretty much like yours is. I flap the dark cloth down over the glass, then zip it up and it's ready to go! I keep 2 or 3 lenses (on boards), a watch, filters, food and lens cable above the camera. Spot meter, loupe, and flashlight right next to the camera (camera usually keeps one lens inside of it, mounted backwards). Notepad, water, and film holders go on the flap of the backpack. This is how my Uncle suggested I carry things (most of this stuff here is his!) so I've adopted it, and it's been working quite well! I usually toss in a bit more food before I leave.

http://404photography.net/wip/4x5/setup_01.jpg

M Salhuana
3-Dec-2007, 08:58
I carry all of my gear in the PhotoBackpacker cases ( www.photobackpacker.com). I took all of these cases to REI and bought a front loading mountaineering backpack that fit me. The problem I found with all of the Tamracs, Lowepro and other Photo backpacks is that they are not really built for even weight distribution. The mountaineering backpacks are.

I just came back from a trip to England and I fit all of my equipment this way. The equipment that I fit was:

Canham 5x7
240mm lens
360mm lens
90mm lens
135mm lens
2x5 Back
Six 5x7 Holders
2 Grafmatic 4x5 holders
Tripod

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Miguel

BradS
3-Dec-2007, 09:28
Where is the film?

I carry film holders in one or, sometimes, two of those soft sided cooler bags intended for a six pack. I think that I can get as meany as 10 film holders in each cooler.

I haven't yet found a good sized cooler bag to hold the 5x7 film holders...so, they are just kinda toted about in a cardboard box for now.

BradS
3-Dec-2007, 09:39
Does any body have a photo of thier re-arranged Lowepro Nature Trekker or Photo Trekker? Thise two are my top contneded right now.

SamReeves
3-Dec-2007, 09:39
I carry all of my gear in the PhotoBackpacker cases ( www.photobackpacker.com). I took all of these cases to REI and bought a front loading mountaineering backpack that fit me. The problem I found with all of the Tamracs, Lowepro and other Photo backpacks is that they are not really built for even weight distribution. The mountaineering backpacks are.

That's a helpful piece of info as I have to replace my old backpack. My back's not the greatest some mornings, so an even distribution would help out a lot.

Mark Woods
3-Dec-2007, 10:02
I would love to see more examples for 8x10 or larger. I'm in process of buying a bag too. I don't go hiking in the woods so much as locally here in Pasadena in the Arroyo.

Matus Kalisky
3-Dec-2007, 10:05
This is great!. Please guys, keep posting - I am on the search for a backpack for my rather compact 4x5 for an "urban" shooting (open-and-take-it-out) as well.

Brian K
3-Dec-2007, 10:25
I use many different camera and bag combinations. As I am currently on the road, a drive only trip, here is what I brought this time. The case is a Lightware backpack, which is too large to safely use as a carry on bag for flying. The meters, Linhof viewfinder, binoculars, zone Vi viewing filter, focus loupes, all the small bits are carried in my photo vest.

I carry 2 sinar zooms, a I and a II, a 545i polaroid back and a kodak readyload holder, all of which stack on each other. Under the camera is a very well protected spare GG.

Eric James
3-Dec-2007, 12:13
This is a 4X5 kit with six lenses. The pack is a top-loading waterproof sack. I own a Super Trekker but this set up is lighter and carries much better. There is certain convenience to the panel-loading approach - one zip and everything is within reach - but for me the efficiency of load carrying and the pack's weather resistance are more important.

Baxter Bradford
3-Dec-2007, 12:16
Here is a shot I had to produce for a review of the Supertrekker.

Have now replaced Super-Angulon 90mm f5.6 with a SSXL 110 which stays on camera. Std bellows now on camera and bag bellows in container. The 120mm has been removed and now have two loupes a 4x and a 10x. Also now swap the Nikkor 210mm with a Cooke PS945 depending on where I am going.

Dark cloth goes around lens and on camera. New toy here - the Paramo darkcloth, developed by Joe Cornish and David Ward; only a couple of outings, but looking like a great product. Only 10 exist at present, full production starting soon.

Ash
3-Dec-2007, 12:28
£25, Nikon SLR Bag

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y43/second-belated/DSC01223.jpg

Fits the Razzle in the main pocket (with space for a box of film with the GG.
DDS on one or both sides, only a few in but more will fit.
Radio flash trigger and meter down the other side, often the big Vivitar flash will fit with the meter and triggers in the front instead, or else the flash can rest on top of the stuff.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y43/second-belated/DSC01225.jpg

The front pockets house the bits and pieces including a Zeiss Nettar 515 for snapshots.

Kuzano
3-Dec-2007, 12:38
This is a 4X5 kit with six lenses. The pack is a top-loading waterproof sack. I own a Super Trekker but this set up is lighter and carries much better. There is certain convenience to the panel-loading approach - one zip and everything is within reach - but for me the efficiency of load carrying and the pack's weather resistance are more important.

WOW!!! You carry a lot of stuff. If you carry the stuff in the first picture, and the dog carries the pack in the second picture, how many days can you stay out before you have to come home and replenish film?

BradS
3-Dec-2007, 12:54
This is a 4X5 kit with six lenses. The pack is a top-loading waterproof sack. I own a Super Trekker but this set up is lighter and carries much better. There is certain convenience to the panel-loading approach - one zip and everything is within reach - but for me the efficiency of load carrying and the pack's weather resistance are more important.

Eric,
Are those Gnass lens cases? and, which Lowepro case is that? I assume that your camera is in the rectagular Lowepro case?

Brad.

Eric James
3-Dec-2007, 12:57
This pack is for day hikes - not shown: food, water and insulation. For overnight trips I use the same bag if I'm working out of my car. For overnight wilderness camping I have a GoLite Jam2 (weighs about a pound) for all the gear pictured minus three lenses; the Jam 2 is then packed inside a larger top-loading pack that contains stove, tent, sleeping bag, etc. I'd show you but the poor dog still has her hopes up from the last demonstration :)

Eric James
3-Dec-2007, 13:18
Brad: Yes, they are the short Gnass lens cases. The LowePro bag is the Omni Sport with an Ebony RW45E inside - larger Ebony 4X5s fit well too. Eric

bsimison
3-Dec-2007, 15:36
I've been working out of the car a lot lately, so I've packed everything into a set of Pelican 1510 dividers inside a generic aluminum tool case I bought from Sam's years ago. Film holders, readyloads, RL holders go into a $10 soft side cooler obtained from Target.

I just received my modified Kelty Redwing back from PhotoBackpacker today. Once I slap together a stiff, foam-padded top to cinch down onto the Pelican dividers, the Kelty will be my LF bag of choice. Hard to beat that suspension in a photo-compatible bag.

BTW, PhotoBackpacker did an excellent job of switching out the factory zipper with a water-resistant, extended zipper on my Kelty. It really opens up the bottom of that pack.

Frank Petronio
3-Dec-2007, 16:21
Finally someone who actually left room for film holders in their backpack ;-)

Wonder what the other guys do?

Daniel_Buck
3-Dec-2007, 17:45
Finally someone who actually left room for film holders in their backpack ;-)

Wonder what the other guys do?

you can't see it in my photo, but on the flap of the backpack (the part that folds out when you unzip the main compartment) there is a big pocket in there, I can carry 8 holders, but I could probably carry double that if I had more to carry. Works quite nicely in a Gnass folder :)

Nigel Smith
3-Dec-2007, 18:02
I use a 65L framed backpack with custom insert... custom cause it's only half finished.. might have to tie wife to sewing machine and not let her go until she's finished it! I store DD's and occasionly Grafmatics in those cooler containers in the bottom section. Can get 2 (so about 18 DD's) in there with a few other things. I've made a GG cover out of matt board to protect that (being Satinsnow, don' want to break that!). I use a wood tripod but that's a pain to carry, even in a bag with a shoulder strap. Really need a tripod that can be tied to the backpack.

bsimison
3-Dec-2007, 19:06
I've made a GG cover out of matt board to protect that (being Satinsnow, don' want to break that!).

I made my GG protector out of a piece of plexiglas scrap, free from the local hardware store. Using my oven to heat up the plexi to about 250 deg F, I formed it into a clamshell cover that slips perfectly around both sides of the GG.

Colin Graham
3-Dec-2007, 21:42
Mountainsmith Odysssey for 5x12- main clamshell in back for camera, horseblanket and 5 lenses, separate compartment for 4 holders, and another separate pocket up font for filters, compendium shade, meter, bag bellows, etc. Mounted on the side are tripod and bracket for verticals.

Mark Woods
3-Dec-2007, 22:02
I keep my film holders in plastic bags. Am I the only one?

David Karp
3-Dec-2007, 22:25
No. I keep mine in ziploc type bags. Others use antistatic bags used in the computer industry.

BradS
4-Dec-2007, 09:26
Mountainsmith Odysssey for 5x12- main clamshell in back for camera, horseblanket and 5 lenses, separate compartment for 4 holders, and another separate pocket up font for filters, compendium shade, meter, bag bellows, etc. Mounted on the side are tripod and bracket for verticals.

Wow! Cool rig. What is the purpose of the aluminum 'L' bracket on the right side (in first photo) ?

Colin Graham
4-Dec-2007, 10:23
Thanks Brad. I love the bag just wish it fit me a little better..That bracket is for for mounting the camera on it side. Don't use it that often but it's nice to have for vertical panos. Stole the idea from Lotus (http://www.lotusviewcamera.at/cameras/lovica_8x20_e.html)

Eric Woodbury
4-Dec-2007, 11:28
Here's a 4x5 travel kit in a Domke Original bag. I don't like backpacks on planes and in cities. Bag has Ebony RW45 with 4 lenses from 58 to 240. 3 lenses in outside pockets. Film holders will fit in outside pockets, too. There is a lightmeter and bottle of water, nicknacks. Tripod is carried by hand.

And then there is the 5x7 Lowepro medium size backpack for car travel. Lenses from 72 to 450, filters, filmholders, meters, loupe, close glasses, and all the crap in the bag. Room in exterior for water and light coat. Camera and tripod ride on my shoulder usually. Big lenses don't travel far from the car or I get a caddy to help with another bag.

Scott --
4-Dec-2007, 11:56
You don't just flop that thing over on its side on the tripod head? ;)

Colin, what're the dimensions of your 5x12 closed? I want to get a bag for my 5x12, but I think it's a bit bigger (the camera I modified was huge...).

Scott

Thanks Brad. I love the bag just wish it fit me a little better..That bracket is for for mounting the camera on it side. Don't use it that often but it's nice to have for vertical panos. Stole the idea from Lotus (http://www.lotusviewcamera.at/cameras/lovica_8x20_e.html)

Colin Graham
4-Dec-2007, 12:43
You don't just flop that thing over on its side on the tripod head? ;)

Colin, what're the dimensions of your 5x12 closed? I want to get a bag for my 5x12, but I think it's a bit bigger (the camera I modified was huge...).

Scott

Hi Scott, yeah, I tried that- once. That was plenty!
The dimensions are roughly 10" x 16" x 5" closed up. Big for a 5x12 but I just had to have rear rise (even though I haven't used it yet). Yours might fit. I picked the bag up last year in Raleigh NC for about $100.

Scott --
5-Dec-2007, 09:02
Thanks, Colin - they're actually pretty close in size. Now I have to watch for a sale... ;)

Mike Snider
5-Dec-2007, 20:02
I use a Lowepro Photo Trekker AW. Food, water, or whatever can be stored on accesory attachments or in a day pack that fits to the back of the pack. Carrying the tripod on the pack works OK. I use "Lock and Lock" food containers that I bought at Walmart. They hold five film holders perfectly. Other accesories go in a third container. My kit includes a Tachihara 4X5, three lenses, a Toyo loupe, a light meter, ten film holders, the tripod, and a Black Jacket that goes on top of the camera to protect the ground glass.

7867

7868

nathanm
5-Dec-2007, 22:55
I've got the same pack as above. The Shen-Hao 4x5, four lenses: 65, 180, 90, 300 (although I usually leave the 300mm at home) four film holders, polaroid and fuji holders, lens shade, filter pouches, light meter, and the bag bellows covers the camera. The rest goes in the flap compartment, dark cloth and polaroid film etc. The polaroid back is a bit obnoxious with its bulk, I'm glad the film I bought is running out.

My tripod is a Berlebach 3042 and there's no way it would fit in the provided sling so I rigged up some straps and I carry that in front. The pack is really nice and it's got room to spare. Very comfortable too, with the hip pads\straps you can put most of the weight there. What's shown here weighs in at 30lbs. (plus the tripod, like 7 lbs. I think) which is a bit of a pain but so far I haven't gone on any long hikes. The most I've walked with that was about six miles which was...plenty! *whew*

Emrehan Zeybekoglu
8-Dec-2007, 05:30
Hi everyone,

Here's my made-to-be-abused trusty Tenba. Its contents are more modest than some others displayed here but here we go. It houses my 4x5 camera, 2 Schneider babies and my good old Gossen with its spot attachment - really antiquated stuff in today's standards but what the heck..The Mamiya loupe stands upright next to the meter, and the remaining space houses bits and pieces like black tape, canned air and my compass.

This bag is actually for the digital photographer but I can use it in my own way. The orange dividers are from the old Tenba that I abused for 22 years! (No, I don't own shares in Tenba, nor do I work for them - they just make stuff that lasts..).

The flap goes over the main compartment, and the top cover houses my limited number of filters on the inside and various other little things on the outside pockets (pockets galore). The tubular dark cloth goes between the flap and the top cover, adding more protection. On the bottom is another compartment, a fairly large one, which is designed to hold a laptop; but in my case that's the section where I put my film holders. It really is safe, protecting the equipment well.

Some people might find this heavy but I'd rather have a peace of mind than slipping on a rock and losing all this stuff because it wasn't padded well.

Cheers..

eddie
10-Dec-2007, 04:15
I use a Lowepro Photo Trekker AW. Food, water, or whatever can be stored on accesory attachments or in a day pack that fits to the back of the pack. Carrying the tripod on the pack works OK. I use "Lock and Lock" food containers that I bought at Walmart. They hold five film holders perfectly. Other accesories go in a third container. My kit includes a Tachihara 4X5, three lenses, a Toyo loupe, a light meter, ten film holders, the tripod, and a Black Jacket that goes on top of the camera to protect the ground glass.


those food containers are a great idea. i ma going to buy some today. thanks

eddie

David_Senesac
10-Dec-2007, 15:15
http://www.davidsenesac.com/Backpacking/4x5_gear_Aw.jpg

The above is just part of the photo gear in my daypack. For the rest plus an explanation of weight, from my webpage select the Backpacking Photo Gear" link at the top of my homepage page. I backpack extensively with my gear and since last year have been using a newer REI backpack to piggyback my big photo daypack to than the blue one shown in the pic at page bottom. Will need to update that. ...David

joolsb
11-Dec-2007, 01:16
After discovering that my LowePro Pro Trekker weighs 5Kg even when empty, I decided to look around for other alternatives. I got myself a Mammut traveller-style backpack and then set about figuring out alternatives for the protective padding:

http://web.mac.com/jbarkway/iWeb/Photos/France_files/MyPhotoBag.jpg

Key:

1. Ebony 45SU with 150mm lens in place, stabilised by internal luggage compression straps
2. Gnass Gear lens case containing 75, 90, 210 and 300mm lenses, each with cable-release and Lee adapter ring
3. Lee filter wallet containing various ND grads, polariser and warm-ups
4. Sekonic 508 light meter in own case.
5. GnassGear Quickload wallet containing Quickload holder, pen and (usually) QL envelopes.
6. (In 'wet' compartment) ground sheet
7. (In 'wet' compartment) fingerless gloves
8. (In 'wet' compartment) headlamp
9. Polythene container for temporary storage of oddments whilst working (or food whilst hiking)
10. Composing frame
11. (In security compartment) lens wrench, cleaning equipment
12. Old black fleece doubling as darkcloth (normally stowed over camera)
13. Spare QL envelopes
14. Loupe

Also usually present is a notebook and pen. The tripod attaches to the side with the carrying handle, with two legs threaded through the external compression straps and two bungees 'borrowed' from my LowePro bag, attaching top and bottom.

Total weight-saying over the LowePro bag: 2kg!

Vaughn
11-Dec-2007, 08:26
Here is my pack for my 8x10...a travel pack that I made dividers for.

Zone VI 8x10
Blue foam case -- Fuji W 300mm f5.6
Blue lens wrap -- 19" RD Artar (barrel)
bubble wrap -- a 210mm and a 159mm
red gadget bag
darkcloth and Pentax Digital spot

The extra piece of closed-cell foam goes over the camera -- nice to sit on on snow/rough ground...or to set equipment on.

On exterior shot, one can see the detachable top-loading day pack -- holds five 8x10 holders and in the front zippered caompartment goes cable release, note book, et al.

One or two more 8x10 holders can go inside the pack between the extra piece of foam and the front of the pack. I use a Reis A100 and A250 head -- the head can fit into the pack if I go any distance w/o photographing

Vaughn

Ed Richards
13-Dec-2007, 19:25
I am curious how you use these backpacks - do you set them on the ground to uppack?

I am looking for a way to carry stuff in the field that does not require setting anything on the ground, ever, and also does not require a balancing act to avoid dumping everything when I am trying to something out of the bag. I noticed one shoulder bag in this lot, which looks like it would let you work with the bag still on your shoulder.

Vaughn
13-Dec-2007, 21:35
My 8x10 camera pack weighs about 45 pounds -- more if I fill the exterior side pockets full of water and food -- so yes, I set the thing on the ground!

If I was using my 4x5 and did not want to set anything on the ground, it would be rather easy. My Gowland 4x5 weighs just over a kilo with the lens (2.5 lbs). I would carry the camera on the tripod and work from a shoulder bag (in it, a meter, 6 or 8 holders, an odds and ends bag). The darkcloth would be wrapped around the camera. The deciding factor would be how far I was hiking...if the distance is great, I'd prefer a backpack.

Actually, I have seen Richard Misrach work with an 8x10 this same way at Pt. Lobos...very impressive! No wonder he could use an 8x10 to photogrphic fires in the desert! If I remember right he did not use a meter.

Vaughn

Eric James
13-Dec-2007, 23:36
I am curious how you use these backpacks - do you set them on the ground to uppack?

I am looking for a way to carry stuff in the field that does not require setting anything on the ground, ever, and also does not require a balancing act to avoid dumping everything when I am trying to something out of the bag. I noticed one shoulder bag in this lot, which looks like it would let you work with the bag still on your shoulder.


Hi Ed,

The LowePro-like bags provide a great advantage in that they make everything available with one unzipping. The trade-off here is that they are heavier and don't carry as well. My remedy is the blue tarp pictured in my first post. It goes on the ground first, and then everything is unpacked onto it - this take less than a minute. If the weather takes a turn for the worse you can just fold the tarp over the gear and continue to shoot. I designate a clean side and fold it in when packing up. Others here use a similar system - someone uses a shower curtain and prefers it because it's lighter and more compact. I like the durability and price of the 6X8 utility tarps.

Cheers

Laurent
21-Dec-2007, 12:09
My contri...

Lowepro Nature trekker AW, I attach the tripod on the bag (stopped doing it with the Manfrotto 055, but the Berlebach is much lighter)

Actually, I just went back to the backpack, and stuffed the 35mm in the Nova5 AW I previously used for LF. Sorry, I have no pics of this arrangement, which was nice to use.

Photobackpacker
23-Dec-2007, 12:03
HI Ed:

This is my personal kit. I, too, prefer to keep my bag off of the ground. By hanging it from the tripod, you keep the straps clean and add some mass to the tripod to surpress vibrations as well.


I am curious how you use these backpacks - do you set them on the ground to uppack?

I am looking for a way to carry stuff in the field that does not require setting anything on the ground, ever, and also does not require a balancing act to avoid dumping everything when I am trying to something out of the bag. I noticed one shoulder bag in this lot, which looks like it would let you work with the bag still on your shoulder.

David A. Goldfarb
27-Dec-2007, 06:22
Since I'm on the road and it's raining right now, I thought I'd post a few quick webcam shots of what I think of as my medium-size 4x5" kit. I'm in Chicago for a conference, and I've been doing a little street shooting and a few snapshots (handheld with just the 150/4.5 Xenar--not the whole bag), and then I'm visiting the in-laws in Hawai'i, so there will be some family snapshots, landscapes, and I hope we get a chance to see the albatrosses at Ka'ena Point on O'ahu, and then my family in Las Vegas, so more family stuff and landscapes.

The bag is a Crumpler Fux Deluxe. In the top layer shot you can see two Kinematic filmholders (like a Grafmatic, but 10 shots) loaded with Efke PL 100 and TXP. That's all the film I brought with me, but I can buy more in Chicago if I have time to shoot between my conference events, and then I've got film in the freezer in Hawai'i from a previous trip. On the left is a 6x7 Super-Rollex back, which is for the albatrosses (I'll shoot color slide). Then to the right is a Toyo loupe, Linhof finder, and Linhof shade and filter holders; Tech V with 150/4.5 Xenar to the right of that; and the grip on the far right. When I'm out shooting, I leave the grip attached and don't zip the insert.

The front inside pockets have my B&W filter wallet on the left (color filters I left home); small case (see last photo) with odds and ends, Digisix meter, Kinematic brush and lens cloth in the center; center filter and wide angle shade on the right. The front pocket (closed) has things like my notebook and a changing bag for emergencies (I normally reload at the place I'm staying).

The bottom layer photo shows a 360/5.5 Tele-Xenar (albatrosses) and 135/3.5 Planar (low light, family stuff, street, landscapes) to the left of the camera, and a 75/4.5 Grandagon-N (landscapes) to the right.

The small blue case holds all the things that seem to bother the TSA inspectors and gets checked while I'm flying--rangefinder cams, small tools, cable releases, and such. There is a cable release attached to the 150 inside the camera and a cam for the 150 in case my checked bag is delayed.

The tripod I'm using at the moment is a Tiltall, and it gets checked in a Tenba TTP case, which also holds my clothes and everything else, so I don't need to carry another bag.

mrladewig
28-Dec-2007, 08:48
I pack with a deuter futura zero 40. Its a traditional hiking rucksack rather than a dedicated photo backpack. Everything drops in the top, so it doesn't really make sense to show the layout, but it is basically first aid and clothing on the bottom. Fishing gear if applicable next and camera stuff on the top. I've actually never purchased a dedicated photo backpack as I've always felt that a traditional hiking pack was better suited to my needs, and my hiking packs have lasted a very long time. This Deuter just replaced a Mountainsmith Wizard that I'd been hauling around rock climbing and mountaineering and skiing for almost 15 years.

What I really like about this pack is the mesh trampoline style back panel. This pack carries cooler and more comfortably than any pack I've ever carried before. A lightweight frame separates the pack from your back and keeps the mesh taught. Osprey and Gregory make similar daypacks and Osprey even makes a couple ultralight backpacking packs with this configuration. I just bought my wife a smaller Osprey daypack model like this for Christmas.

One other thing. If you carry a 35mm body when you hike, look into the Think Tank camera support straps. They are the little black bits you can see on the should harness. They clip into the webbing on your should harness, and you can attach your camera strap to them so that you don't support the camera's weight on your neck. These are my favorite camera accessory to date and they only cost about $15.

PS, sorry about the mess in the background. My printing/framing room is still recovering from the Christmas rush. Time for some serious spring cleaning.

Sanjay Sen
28-Dec-2007, 11:13
I am curious how you use these backpacks - do you set them on the ground to uppack? <snip>

Yes, I set the backpack (Lowepro CompuTrekker for 4x5, F.64 BPX for 8x10) on the ground to unzip and take stuff out. However, if there's an elevated surface available, I will use that instead. Putting the backpack on the ground may not be the best option I'd like to take, but sometimes that's the only option. :)

mrladewig
28-Dec-2007, 14:08
I am curious how you use these backpacks - do you set them on the ground to uppack?

I am looking for a way to carry stuff in the field that does not require setting anything on the ground, ever, and also does not require a balancing act to avoid dumping everything when I am trying to something out of the bag. I noticed one shoulder bag in this lot, which looks like it would let you work with the bag still on your shoulder.

If you use a shorter rucksack, you can keep the waist belt attached and swing the pack around front and then get what you need. At least with a rucksack you can get into it standing up, but the downside is sometimes you have to take stuff out to get to the stuff you're looking for. I usually just look for a tall rock to set mine on.

Another pack I seriously considered is the Deuter Futura Vario 40+10. Its harness and backpanel are just like mine, but it ditches the ultralight mentality of my pack. Instead it has front zipper access to the bottom of the ruck sack, which can be separated from the upper rucksack with a divider. It also has some side pockets. It was a special order item, where my current pack was available locally.

Mel-

Chris C
30-Dec-2007, 04:47
The last few months I've been far more interested in using my 4x5 as more of a walk around camera. I always absolutly hated carrying my Lowe Pro Nature Trekker AW II around city streets and just anywhere off hiking trails, especially at night just because it stood out a little too much and was more cumbersome to use than I would have liked.

I decided to have a look at my Lowe Pro Omni Traveler and see if I could make it work for me. I've got a very simple kit anyway, so I knew I could get most of what I need in there. As it stands, I can get my Shen Hao 4x5 with 150mm lens mounted backwards and folded closed, anywhere up to 4 film holders, a loupe, really basic old Sekonic light meter (the one weakness in my kit, but I'm too poor to do anything about it right now), an old t-shirt lens hood and a lee filter system with a couple of graduated ND's.

My backpack will still get used when I need to hike anywhere over rough ground for more than a couple of kms, but as it is now, this is such a small and light bag it's really hard make myself want to go back to my backpack. When I eventually buy a 90mm lens I expect I'll be using my pack a lot more, but for now this is perfect for me.

Joanna Carter
30-Dec-2007, 05:51
Along with other respondents, I use a Lowepro PhotoTrekker AW packed with:
Ebony SV45Te; 72mm, 90mm, 150mm, 210mm and 300mm lenses; Konica Minolta Flashmeter VI and Color Meter IIIF meters; Lee filter holders; complete set of Formatt colour correction and ND/grad filters; cable releases; blower; etc. And in the front pouch, I have around 20-30 sheets of Quickload and a holder.

I find the inbuilt groundsheet/cover very useful for damp or messy ground.

Rory_5244
23-Mar-2008, 09:42
I've got an Arca 8x10 crammed into a Lowepro Phototrekker AW II. The camera rests on the film holders (4), and on the dark cloth. The dark cloth folds over the camera, and the edges are stuffed in between the standards and the bellows. An extra lens goes into a side-pocket.

This arrangement works well, but the bag is far too heavy, and screams, "expensive photo equipment!", which isn't too good for my well-being where I live. When I get the money I'll approach Photobackpacker to put together one of his hiking backpacks for me. Unfortunately, I can't head down to a store and try out backpacks (no such thing here in the Caribbean), so the Photobackpacker route seems like the best bet, unless someone has some ideas to share. The dimensions of the Arca are: 17.5"(height) x 12.5"(width) x 7.5"(depth).

scrichton
28-Mar-2008, 05:21
Before I ditched it my bag was my hand when using the speed graphic.

135mm on the plate, 4 film holders in my back pocket and a lightmeter round my neck. Oh and a simple plastic bag for rainy days to wrap it in.

I used to take my sophisticated shoe leather zoom too :)

Frank Petronio
28-Mar-2008, 08:51
haha Scrichton has it right

Get a cheap enough camera you don't have to worry about it and fill your pockets with film holders.

eddie
31-Mar-2008, 04:57
i use a tamrac expidition 3 pack!

inside is:

chamonix 4x5

older convertible lens 150-220-320

one grafmatic holder.

if i took out those filters fro my 35mm i could probably get more in there! (it doubles aas my 35mm kit bag too)

eddie

eddie
31-Mar-2008, 05:00
I've got an Arca 8x10 crammed into a Lowepro Phototrekker AW II. The camera rests on the film holders (4), and on the dark cloth.

hello rory,

be careful with your film holder dark slides when you pack like this. i broke a DS doing something similar when i was in the tetons. of course it was my one of two sheets of E6 8x10! it could not have been one of my bracketed B&W shots huh?!

now i use holders with metal slides on the outside of my "packs of film holders"

eddie

Rory_5244
31-Mar-2008, 13:56
Egad. Thanx for the tip, eddie! I'll see if I can alter the arrangement of things.

Eugene van der Merwe
27-Dec-2008, 05:42
Here is my setup, belatedly... All stuffed rather carefully into a phototrekker AW.

tonyluong
4-Feb-2010, 09:16
Here is my setup, this is what I use to fly, only my tripod goes in my check-in luggage wrapped in bubblewrap/clothes/other things.

Toyo 45A w/ Fujinon 150mm f/5.6
Sekonic L-358
5 Riteway Holders
Toyo Loupe
Tripod: Bogen 808RC4 head w/ 190CX3 CF legs
Films: Kodak 160NC & 400NC
Contax G2 Rangefinder
Ziplock bag filled with random items (labels, business cards, lens wipe, extra cable release)
Moleskine and pens

Bag is Domke J-2. Perfect fit for my kit and just an amazing bag in itself.

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g104/toldey/setup1.jpg

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g104/toldey/setup2.jpg

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g104/toldey/setup3.jpg

ki6mf
5-Feb-2010, 13:47
I use a Joe Farace from Adorama $79.95 US

http://www.adorama.com/GBRBK.html

jeroldharter
5-Feb-2010, 15:03
I've got an Arca 8x10 crammed into a Lowepro Phototrekker AW II. The camera rests on the film holders (4), and on the dark cloth. The dark cloth folds over the camera, and the edges are stuffed in between the standards and the bellows. An extra lens goes into a side-pocket.

This arrangement works well, but the bag is far too heavy, and screams, "expensive photo equipment!", which isn't too good for my well-being where I live. When I get the money I'll approach Photobackpacker to put together one of his hiking backpacks for me. Unfortunately, I can't head down to a store and try out backpacks (no such thing here in the Caribbean), so the Photobackpacker route seems like the best bet, unless someone has some ideas to share. The dimensions of the Arca are: 17.5"(height) x 12.5"(width) x 7.5"(depth).

That is a nice camera. Do the bellows extend beyond the limits of the rear function frame? If so, I would worry about the friction on the bellows. The Photobackpacker packs are not really padded. They have a stiff, lightly padded backer board to which puropose built cases for lenses and cameras are affixed with velcro. He can make a custom case for the camera but the unique shapes of various ARca models presents some challenges. The packs are excellent and very comfortable for walking.

Darren H
18-Jul-2010, 09:46
Thought this thread might need to be revived.

Here is my Arca-Swiss kit.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4805402470_453b6c0aba.jpg

Pack is a LowePro PhotoTrekker AW

In the main part of the pack

Camera is Arca-Swiss Discovery (F-Line is same sized) with 171mm frames and Wide angle leather bellows

3 lenses, 75mm, 125mm, 210mm

5 film holders

Pentax digital spot meter

Cokin P holders (reg and wide) and 67mm adapter ring (all my lenses are 67mm)

Loupe with headlamp underneath

In pockets are polarizer, spare cable release, lens cloth, gray card, lens wrench (never needed in field)

On back of pack I have the Trekker day pack attached that holder filter wallet and a box of Quickloads plus QL holder. I would also add food water and or jacket here also.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4080/4805402476_a8e2102a2d.jpg


I usually carry tripod in hand but can strap it to side.

Panasonic LX-3 worn around neck to scout with.

mentalcrisis00
14-Dec-2010, 20:26
Reviving this thread. Just got all my 4x5 gear in order and a bag i can carry it all in. Funny thing I was actually about to give this bag away or throw it out. I bought it a long time ago to carry my DSLR and my laptop but it turned out to be too unwieldy. By the time I took it off, opened it up, and got my DSLR out the decisive moment was lost.

Once I got my 4x5 gear I was scrambling to find a worthy hard case for it. When I saw that putting it all in a bag made more sense because of portability. I found that I can fit my Wista 45DX, 90mm Super Angulon f/8, 210mm Caltar f5.6, tiny 135mm Xenar, two 50 sheet boxes of 4x5, either my polaroid back with 4 film holders or no polaroid back and 10 film holders, Sekonic L758 meter, cable releases, dark clothe, rocket air, and whatever little accessories I bring. I also bought a domke soft wrap for the camera because I'm paranoid about it being in there unprotected.

48544485454854648547

jonathan_lipkin
17-Dec-2010, 06:09
I just picked up an f/64 film holder bag:

http://www.f64camerabag.com/system_accessories.html

It's quite nice. I strap it to the side of my Loewpro Mini Trekker. I think the claim of holding six holders is a bit optimistic. With six holders, it's a bit tight.

Matus Kalisky
19-Dec-2010, 14:30
Well, this bag was not meant for 4x5 equipment, but could be used for that purpose too. It is a "Messenger super deluxe", size "Small" from Courierware with a few custom adjustments I have requested. The bag is very well made and well though out. I use it very often with Mamiya 6. I even wrote a review (http://www.cambags.com/bag-type/shoulder-bags-menu/misc-shoulder-bags/item/458-courierware-super-deluxe-messenger.html) for it (cambags.com)


with Tachi 4x5:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4074/4896600111_a1d9a6baa7.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/31007239@N06/4896600111/in/set-72157624735493682/)

with mamiya 6:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4897196072_93d3e50d12.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/31007239@N06/4897196072/in/set-72157624735493682/)

philipmorg
19-Dec-2010, 17:53
I'll show my "bag", even though I'm afraid it'll get laughed at for being strange! <grin>

Inside the case:


Sinar Norma 4x5 with custom compendium shade (a Linhof shade adapted to fit the Norma) and large compendium mask, Bosscreen, and Sinar binocular viewer (with extra security strap to prevent viewer from detaching from the camera at inopportune moments)
Seven 4x5 film holders
Cable release with "soft-touch' quick releases for each lens
Pens, extra light meter batter
Peak 10x loupe (rests in pill bottle holder!)
Small compendium mask
Nikkor-SW 65mm
Nikkor-W 135mm (attached to camera)
Nikkor-W 180mm
Nikkor-M 300mm
67mm B+W filters: Red, K2, Orange
67mm Mariumi Circular Polarizer
40.5mm Mariumi Circular Polarizer (to fit over the meter and simplify metering scenes that use the polarizer)
Dust blower
Pleated bellows
Two Sinar extension rails
Pentax digital light meter with lens shade and data sheet
Exposure record notebook


Outside the case:



Linhof twin-shank tripod, modified by shortening center column, removing umbrella struts, and adding leg braces, Sinar Pan-Tilt tripod head, & Norma rail clamp.


The case itself:


1/4" baltic birch plywood, custom made, not as heavy as it looks, carried using a combination of vintage Alice kidney belt with modern Alice replacement shoulder straps from Drop Zone Tactical supply in Canada.


The equipment, and the case arrangement, is a joy to use. The camera comes out of the case fully assembled, as close to ready to make a picture as it could possibly be. All the needed accessories are easily within reach without fumbling with zippers or compartments within the case.

http://philipmorgan.net/SinarNormaCase/1.jpg
http://philipmorgan.net/SinarNormaCase/5.jpg
http://philipmorgan.net/SinarNormaCase/6.jpg
http://philipmorgan.net/SinarNormaCase/12.jpg

jonathan_lipkin
21-Dec-2010, 14:30
Phil - is that a slingshot on the back? You can also play angry birds on your iphone, you know.

philipmorg
21-Dec-2010, 14:44
Phil - is that a slingshot on the back? You can also play angry birds on your iphone, you know.

Ha! Looks like one, doesn't it. It's just a latex tubing headstrap, to keep the binocular viewer firmly on my face when in use.

I've heard Angry Birds is highly addictive. I'm trying to stay clear of it for now, for the sake of those near and dear to me. :)

Barry Kirsten
22-Dec-2010, 02:59
I'll show my "bag", even though I'm afraid it'll get laughed at for being strange! <grin>

Not strange at all Philip ;) .

I had one very like it 20 years ago - self-made, with compartments for everything I needed for my Toyo 810G. Weighed I-don't-know-what, and with a shoulder strap made from car seat belt webbing to carry from one shoulder. The other shoulder was used to counterbalance, to some extent, by slinging a Manfrotto tripod. I was a lot fitter then - couldn't use an 8x10 monorail for landscape now.

You've done a great job!

Baz.

Frank Petronio
22-Dec-2010, 23:31
Here's how I go out shooting....

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/data/500/crown_in_backpack_12222010_005.jpg

First I put an inexpensive Graflex Crown Graphic (with 135mm Schneider) into a common bookbag-type school backpack.

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/data/500/crown_in_backpack_12222010_006.jpg

Then I add my six-sheet Grafmatic film holder. If I can't get a good shot in six then I suck so why waste more film?

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/data/500/crown_in_backpack_12222010_008.jpg

My luxury item is an expensive 7x Horseman hood loupe that is long enough for me to use with the Crown's metal viewing hood extended. Note the structural enhancements made to the camera with Gaffer's tape.

http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/data/500/crown_in_backpack_12222010_010.jpg

And this? It's the secret weapon. Now I have to kill you.

The Ebony I carried around like this is now used for toothpicks. I sold the Arca I used to have for scrap metal. The Sinar Norma hurt my back. And the Phillips kept breaking the ground glass.... Nope, for me the Crown Graphic is the ultimate camera ;-)

Caivman
23-Dec-2010, 07:01
well said my friend.... well said.

It's sad that your "secret Weapon" is heavier than your camera and film combined...
Now that i'm thinking about it.... it probably gets more use out in the field than your camera and film as well. lol.

Nothing beats a rugged Graphic

jss
23-Dec-2010, 09:32
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1368/4721679790_e0e2fcc557.jpg
(link (http://www.flickr.com/photos/schlachet/4721679790/))

this is my 'party camera' kit. crown graphic, 4 grafmatics, sunpak 444d, bogen bracket. it *barely* fits in this domke bag.

jvuokko
9-Mar-2011, 14:46
My 4x5 packs: 4x5 Field goes in small shoulder bag or Lowepro Nature Trekker when more walking is required.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4021/4491315532_692ef3a0a7.jpg
(Link (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jvuokko/4491315532/in/set-72157613415967599/)


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3461/3259158748_c78bde3d7c.jpg
(Link (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jvuokko/3259158748/in/set-72157613415967599/))


The 4x5 monorail fits in the Lowepro Pro Trekker:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3315/3477771200_381307ffd4.jpg
(Link (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jvuokko/3477771200/in/set-72157613415967599/))



8x10 monorail - so far haven't figure out..
Way too big for my current bags..
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5006/5312733198_1d9e83a562.jpg
(Link (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jvuokko/5312733198/in/set-72157613415967599/))

Thoughts and ideas goes on another thread (http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?t=73224).

ypres.bass
10-Mar-2011, 12:33
wow,
hey philip, it's transport unit of AntiAircraft artillery? :)

philipmorg
10-Mar-2011, 14:18
wow,
hey philip, it's transport unit of AntiAircraft artillery? :)

I bet it could! :)

David R Munson
10-Oct-2011, 08:22
http://www.aleatorist.net/aleatorist/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/MG_07371.jpg
The bag is a ThinkTank Photo Urban Disguise 40 (first generation), somewhere here in in the pile of crap in the photo. I've just made an extended post about its contents here on my blog (http://www.aleatorist.net/aleatorist/?p=585).

tgtaylor
10-Oct-2011, 09:47
Here's my set-up for day hiking with the Toyo 45C monorail:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6171/6231284648_e3b73499e6_z.jpg

The cameras bottom is resting on a small case (out of sight in the above image)containing cleaning supplies and a small blower. The lens (90mm Grandagon f4.5 and Schneider 210mm Symmer-S) are in the blue Crown Royal sacks and the 150mm is mounted on the camera. The film holders (10 to 12) are in the two f64 cases which attach to the sides of the pack with a 1 liter water bottle (yellow case) along with the tripod. The black case at the cameras top contains a Cokin Z filter holder with step ring attached and several filters are scattered about. Finally the dark cloth is placed as extra padding and the rail is carried in the outside pocket as shown. The pack itself is a Lowepro AW Trekker - the new model.

Until a few days ago I was seriously thinking about selling this camera but decided to keep it specifically for short day hikes where the movements of a monorail are needed.

Thomas

Drew Wiley
10-Oct-2011, 10:41
Now that I'm just a couple of weeks away from being recognized by the US Govt itself
as a certified Geezer eligible for my Golden park permit, I've invested in pure style.
I found an absolutely unused Kelty US-made Tioga pack from the 60's with real leather
patches an all. The gear repair specialist down the street is adding some more matching accessory pockets to it, as well as making me up a couple more black
Goretex darkcloths. Inside that goes my recently acqquied and all polished up Sinar Norma of similar vintage. Now I need to get a new handle turned for my wooden ice axe; but too bad I can't find any hobbed-nailed mtn boots! A friend did offer me an ancient frayed manila climbing rope, but I passed.

lenicolas
10-Oct-2011, 11:21
Call me vain or superficial, but i hate camera bags.

So i use this vintage schoolbag that i found in the street one night :
http://i54.tinypic.com/24fh9c0.jpg

It holds:
Sekonic L358s, 2 film holders (+1 on the camera), Folded Chamonix 45n1
Box of film, 135mm nikkor, Charging bag / Dark cloth.
http://i53.tinypic.com/2vbu97o.jpg

I can squeeze a polaroid back into it, but i don't use it that much anymore, it's too expensive and not that usefull.

I carry that bag on my hand, and a tripod across my back.
Sure i wouldn't lug this set up around for too long, but my subjects don't require much walking. It also helps that i'm a one lens guy...

John Rodriguez
13-Oct-2011, 05:48
F-Stop Gear Tilopa w/large ICU. Great pack for hiking.

Right now:
Toyo 45 CF w/ Fujinon 125mm f/5.6 mounted
Fujinon 240mm f/6.3
10 holders
Sekonic L-558
Shutter release
Filters

I'm about to swap the ICU for an XL from their new series - http://fstopgear.com/en/product/mountain/icu

That will allow me to add a 180mm and 90mm.

http://i55.tinypic.com/e00f0l.jpg

http://i51.tinypic.com/feffwo.jpg

DrTang
13-Oct-2011, 08:04
no pix, but I found a big ol Portabrace bag at a yard sale for a good price


they make all kinds of sizes and are built for pro movie maker use - so very rugged and well thought out

Yef
27-May-2012, 03:20
Bag: Goruck radio ruck with photobackpacker inserts .
camera: Chamonix 4x5
lenses: 90 angular, 240 symmar XL
6 film holder and Minolta V light-meter .742507425174252

Drew Bedo
28-May-2012, 07:36
7432874329I put a Wista Made Zone VI and all my stuff into this old LowePro 35mm "Magnum 35"; a case (made in the 1980s?) for photojournalists. Its got about 20 loops for 35mm film cans in the lid!


Six Film Holders
Grafmatic Magazine
Filtwers
Loup
Minolta Autometer IV F
9 degree spot attachment
380mm wollensak Tele-Optar
210mm Caltar II N
150mm Fujinon
90mm Nikkor W
Zone VI 4x5 Camera

fralexis
29-May-2012, 18:14
Yef,

How comfortable is the Goruck Radio Ruck? Do you miss a padded waist belt to help carry the weight?

Alexis

Yef
30-May-2012, 00:53
I have many deferent bags, and i tried a lot of them - but that the only bag i found sitting well on my back is the Goruck - i just love the straps and the extra pocket for my laptop . it's a very well made back. It's kind a short on my back so even if i had a belt it wouldn't been helpful for me . Generally i never use the waist belt in bags - i took it off my Kata(a very small and not useful) and in my ThinkTank ShapeShifter i took it off as well. I would definitely recommend this bag.

manet
1-Jun-2012, 05:56
Hello,
I just finished my homemade case for my LF camera Gilles-Faller.

bobwysiwyg
1-Jun-2012, 08:18
Call me vain or superficial, but i hate camera bags.

So i use this vintage schoolbag that i found in the street one night :
http://i54.tinypic.com/24fh9c0.jpg

It holds:
Sekonic L358s, 2 film holders (+1 on the camera), Folded Chamonix 45n1
Box of film, 135mm nikkor, Charging bag / Dark cloth.
http://i53.tinypic.com/2vbu97o.jpg

I can squeeze a polaroid back into it, but i don't use it that much anymore, it's too expensive and not that usefull.

I carry that bag on my hand, and a tripod across my back.
Sure i wouldn't lug this set up around for too long, but my subjects don't require much walking. It also helps that i'm a one lens guy...

You're just a recycler. :) I like it.

Warang27
1-Jun-2012, 19:38
Bag: Goruck radio ruck with photobackpacker inserts .
camera: Chamonix 4x5
lenses: 90 angular, 240 symmar XL
6 film holder and Minolta V light-meter .742507425174252


wow... great backpack. will see if i have time to see on how much is it in our place..

Kirk Gittings
2-Sep-2014, 15:05
This is a thread I've wanted to start for some time:
Here is my current kit with the older Kelty pack PBP sold (newer is a better BP and maybe larger?). PBP camera case divided with 4x5 Phillips and 2 lenses + 3 in Gnass lens case (PBP has equivalent), Gnass cascade film holder case (PBP has equivalent), light meter, loupe, Readyloads and holder, filters etc. On outer flap a Camelback water bladder fits plus room for munchies etc. For my DSLR kit I have another full insert by PBP that fits right in-takes seconds to change out.

121167

Sal Santamaura
2-Sep-2014, 15:16
Or you could have just added to this existing thread:


http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?31080-Show-your-bag

:D:D

Christopher Barrett
2-Sep-2014, 15:18
You're sporting a bit o glass there, Mr. Gittings!

Kirk Gittings
2-Sep-2014, 16:04
Yes indeed it includes a 90mm Schneider SA, a 120 Nikkor SW, a Nikkor 150, a 210 Schneider Symmar and a 350 G-Claron. I'm not a long lens person or a super wide person so I sold off my 65 xl and my Nikkor 450.

Old_Dick
2-Sep-2014, 17:10
Hi Kirk,


Where/how do you carry your tripod?


?
Dick

Kirk Gittings
2-Sep-2014, 18:00
Dick, I can strap it on the pack but I usually carry it over my shoulder.

lenser
2-Sep-2014, 18:07
Zone VI 4x5 camera with normal and bag bellows, 58mm xl, 90mm Caltar II, 165mm Caltar, 210mm Caltar II, several Cokin filters, at least six film holders, Toyo loupe, Calumet close up scale, Zone VI notebook, Focus cloth, Zone VI Cordura bag, several cable releases, Lens Pen, Pentax V spot meter. Tripod is a metal Gitzo Studex with a Bogen 210 head. I've pared down by one lens since this was taken.

Kodachrome25
2-Sep-2014, 19:45
If I am not hiking more than 2 miles round trip or if I am snowboarding, at just 2.5 pounds empty I use this Lowe Pro Flipside Sport 15L AW (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/855681-REG/Lowepro_LP36424_PWW_Flipside_Sport_15L_AW.html).

In this photo I have a 40oz Camelbak on one side, medium CF tripod on the other ( not pictured ), inside is my Chamonix 45N2, 6 film holders in anti-static bags, 90mm F8 Nikkor, 135mm F5.6 Apo Sironar S, 180mm F5.6 Apo Symmar, Fujinon 240mm A, 350mm F11 Apo-Tele-Xenar, 10X loupe, incident meter, Pentax spot meter ( in case attached to shoulder strap ) , several step up rings, rubber shade, grad holder, 6 grads & dark cloth rest on lens area and several 67mm glass filters under the Nikon 90mm. I also have other smaller items in-between the insert walls and outer pack, works killer. If I need more film I carry a small Domke satchel that holds more film holders and a 6x12 back.

For longer hikes or even shorter ones with more hang time, I dial back the kit as much as I can and make room for food, more water and clothing and stuff it all in my Lowe Pro Sport 200AW (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/768092-REG/Lowepro_LP36354_PAM_Photo_Sport_200_AW.html).

I have recently ordered a new Photobackpacker P3 pack with 8 lens cases, a case for my 45N2, 4 cascade film cases, two side pouches for the cascades, one spare 12" x 23" top loading backer board and two custom ones for both mine and my wife's overnight packs. This setup ought to help me do a *much* better job at augmenting all of my formats of gear in and around the most important things for great landscape work, time in the field by way of more water, food, clothing and shelter.

My 2....


121173

Randy Moe
2-Sep-2014, 20:34
We need diversion.


Or you could have just added to this existing thread:


http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?31080-Show-your-bag

:D:D

Jmarmck
3-Sep-2014, 05:47
Every time I see a "Show us your ------" I wonder if the photos have to be LF.

Depends on what I am doing and where I am going. If it is a foot work, I will take my brand new P3. Shooting out of the vehicle will most likely be a very old Borealis camera bag with a shoulder strap. I bought it in the 1980's when they were in Fayetteville, AR. Digital, I use a video bag with a shoulder strap. It is longer and narrower than most camera bags. Shooting out my front yard, usually no bag, just the camera on the tripod over the shoulder.

Forrest Atkins
3-Sep-2014, 08:05
Setup for Yellowstone trip in a couple of weeks. Insert, camera cases cobbled together from stuff laying around the house.
Kit includes:
Arca F field compact w/rodenstock 150 apo s
Caltar ll-N 90mm
Schneider 210 apo symmar
Nikon 360 tele
Toyo loupes
Pentax meter
6x9 graflex back
Two zip up lunch bags/6 film holders each.
Lee lens shade with adapter rings
Couple of b&w filters
Etc..

tgtaylor
3-Sep-2014, 09:58
Depending on the camera(s) used, I have 3 dedicated kits for photography:

1. For 35mm, 645 and lightweight 4x5 field I use the LowePro 350 AW Runner:

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5556/14942693400_691a448b3d.jpg

This will carry the F6 (in the Domke wrap) and 645NII with several lens (in the blue sacks), film, tablet and supplies
along with a series 0 Gitzo (attached in the black dust cover) and qualifies as an airline carry-on.

2. 2. For 6x7 and 4x5 technical field I use the Lowepro 400 AW Trekker:

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5563/14942645219_f52f5c8e57.jpg

This will carry a field camera (in the Domke wrap) several lens and supplies. F64 film cases attach to the outside of the pack (and also fit inside) and a Gitzo series 3 tripod attaches to the outside. This may or may not be carry-on for airline travel.

3. For 8x10 field I use the LowePro 600 AW Trekker:

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7316/11184158884_ca322d4d9e.jpg

This will carry the camera and 3 or more lens depending on their size (1 will fold-up with the camera) along with supplies. A series 3 or 5 Gitzo attaches to the outside and 5 to 7 film holders will fit in an outside slip compartment. This is definitely not carry-on.

Finally, for overnight backpack trips the camera, lens and supplies go inside a regular backpacking pack which in my case is a Gregory or Granite Gear.

Thomas

Vaughn
3-Sep-2014, 11:04
Me posing with my tripod at our destination.
Me carrying camera pack in Yosemite, heading to above destination.
Camera pack.
Inside camera pack. I had 4 lenses in it, but now I rarely carry more than three (250/300/480 usually -- but will swap out the 480 for a 210 in close spaces.)

Arne Croell
3-Sep-2014, 11:06
I used to use the Photobackpacker RPT system in an older REI Evening Star, but now just got the P3, so everything moved into that one a few days ago. The basic arrangement has not changed much, though. On the top (right hand side in the image) is a Gnass Gear pouch (blue) for Readyloads and a Readyload holder - this will switch to Bruce's system once I run out of Readyloads. Below it in several RPT boxes are the Technika (with a 240mm Apo-Ronar inside), a 180mm Apo-Sironar digital and a 350mm Apo-Tele-Xenar. Below the camera is a 500mm Nikkor-T, and in the long box are a Super-Symmar HM 120mm, and two Nikkor-SW's, 90mm (f/8) and 65mm. The larger and higher box at the bottom holds the Pentax digital light meter, a compendium lens shade, pen, cable releases, some laminated notes on optimum f-stop choices. The inside pockets of the front flap hold a Domke filter pouch with six 67mm filters, filter adapter rings, spare batteries, diffuser, a small spirit level, spanner wrench, flat brush, spare cable release tips for the Linhof quick release system, a small tube of glue. Readyload film boxes, the "Black Jacket" dark cloth, rain jacket, etc., go on top of the RPT boxes and/or in the front pocket.

konakoa
3-Sep-2014, 12:41
I dearly love my monorail cameras, but there are times they're just not practical nor entirely appropriate to bring on long trips (airline travel).

I also have a tendency to bring way, way too much stuff.

So I made myself simplify things. This isn't a hiking outfit but a long-ways-from-home setup. My field kit consists of a Tamrac shoulder bag. Inside I have a Horseman FA field camera. Three lenses: a Schenider 120mm (newer L model), a Schenider 180mm and a Nikkor 270 telephoto. Six film holders and a single Horseman 6x12 roll film back. A Fuji instant film back for proofs, fun, and the inquisitive passerby. Minolta light meter. Dark cloth, two cable releases, small 8x loupe and a handful of filters round out the kit. Carbon fiber RRS tripod with pan-tilt head is carried separately. A tiny little Panasonic LX5 digital camera is the final addition and completes the photographic setup.

In the past I've missed opportunities because I shot black and white sheet , color sheet, b&w and color roll film all at the same time. A single view would be photographed four or more times without moving the camera. That took a lot of time and didn't allow me to explore or look around as much as I should have. For my field kit I've limited myself strictly to black and white sheet film in the holders, and color transparency roll film in the 6x12 back.

The entire bag below weighs a bit less than eighteen pounds. Less really is more!

Drew Wiley
3-Sep-2014, 13:29
Do you yodel too, Vaughn? I was just counting my packs the other day, as I was stuffing one for the upcoming hike, and trying to repair another. All of mine are
true external frame vintage backpacks fully suitable for multi-day outings with all necessary gear. The only thing I use a shoulder bag for is casual walks with either P67 or a Nikon. LF gear always goes into a full-sized pack. Much more ergo that way. But once I retire, I'll have to drive up to the "real" redwoods. In the meantime, our second-growth stuff down here still has a lot of opportunities. But this next "camera walk" involves two weeks above timberline, so gotta have every kind of essential in that pack, certainly enough to weather out a real blizzard or two, though I'm semi-optimistically hoping for transient storms, just enough to give some nice clouds and lighting. ... yeah, wishful thinking... but it did happen last year for the first time in five years. On these longer walks I leave behind my Ries and use a CF Gitzo, and lighten the gear in general. Just what I really need.

Vaughn
3-Sep-2014, 13:39
Do you yodel too, Vaughn? ...

Of course! It must be the Hawaiian shirt that gave me away!

Actually, the last time I backpacked with the 4x5 (one lens, 5 holders), I took no separate pack for it. Carried the camera on the tripod and worked out of a shoulder bag. Such a fun way to work after hauling an 8x10 or an 11x14 around! Now if I replaced the metal Gitzo Reporter with a carbon fiber pod I could knock a few pounds off the camera gear...no sense putting a 2.5 pound camera (including lens) on a 7 pound tripod -- except that I need the height!

Alan Curtis
3-Sep-2014, 13:56
Not fair Vaughn, you have assistants to help carry your equipment.
It was a pleasure meeting you last month and see your outstanding photographs.

Alan Curtis
3-Sep-2014, 14:30
Just about everything from photo backpacker.
121214

Taken with my LF ipad.

Ari
3-Sep-2014, 16:02
OK, I'll join in, if only to be the only wheeled case on this thread.
I really like wheeled cases; working out of one is preferable (to me) than working out of a backpack.
I bought this in the spring, Lowepro AW 300, and I'm continually amazed by how much I can fit in there.

Toyo 810M with 12" KCE attached
10" WF Ektar
14" KCE
150mm SS XL
Grandagon 115
Heliar 30cm wrapped in chamois cloth
Lens hoods
Loupe, meter, etc in corner pocket and cable releases and etc in the lid
And there's room left for more stuff!
I usually put my dark cloth on top the camera, and have room for three 8x10 holders on top of that, plus the front pocket can take two more holders.
Tripod goes over me shoulder.

Great case, my favourite so far.

Vaughn
3-Sep-2014, 16:37
Not fair Vaughn, you have assistants to help carry your equipment.
It was a pleasure meeting you last month and see your outstanding photographs.

Thanks, and it was a pleasure to meet you and your wife!. Those assistants are smart. Once my head goes under the darkcloth, they seem to magically disappear. Oh well, the way back is usually downhill and the pack for the 8x10 is comfortable enough. I do not notice the extra weight of all the captured light in the film holders. Probably because of the reduced weight in food and water by the time I start back.

Transporting my 11x14 is in a hard sided suitcase (military), holders in a laptop shoulder bag and tripod over the shoulder. Not good for long walks/hikes. It has to be pretty special to haul it more than 1/2 mile...lots of special stuff out there, so I tend to haul it farther than I plan.

Kirk Gittings
3-Sep-2014, 18:17
121226

A wheeled cases just won't go where I need to go. I own two. When on a groomed trail I throw my backpack on this. I can work right out of it at a comfortable height. If I need to leave the groomed trail I fold it up and use a bicycle chain lock to chain it out of sight off the trail and head out with just the backpack.

Christopher Barrett
3-Sep-2014, 18:31
What a great way to transport your 'baby.'

:o

My preferred Urban Assault Vehicle is the Inovativ Scout 37...

https://scontent-b-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/t31.0-8/1795297_10203783296277930_6956751533338409780_o.jpg

Kirk Gittings
3-Sep-2014, 18:39
Whoa!!!!

Drew Bedo
3-Sep-2014, 18:42
121227121228

• Six film holders
• Grafmatic magazine
• B&W Filters
• Loup
• Minolta Autometer IV
• Five degerr spot attachment
• Screw-in close up lenses
• 15"/f5.6 (380mm) Wollensak Tele-Optar
• 210mm/f5.6 Caltar N (rodenstock)
• 150mm/f5.6 Fujinon W
• 90mm/f8 Nikkor SW
• 4x5 Zone VI (Wista)
• LowePro Magnum 35 Shoulder Bag

Ari
3-Sep-2014, 18:57
Whoa!!!!

You took the words right outta my mouth.

Peter Collins
3-Sep-2014, 20:57
My preferred Urban Assault Vehicle is the Inovativ Scout 37...

Yeah, but it needs the handicap curb cuts to cross the street.....

Kodachrome25
3-Sep-2014, 23:00
My preferred Urban Assault Vehicle is the Inovativ Scout 37...

I might have you topped....but you will have to wait until Death Valley to see it....;)

munz6869
3-Sep-2014, 23:01
121243

This is my kit from 2011 - Wista 45DXIII plus light meter and two more lenses. Filters and cable releases, 10ft bulb release and loupe, level, and an RPT cascade film holder in the side pocket. The only changes I've made are a Carbon Fibre version of the same tripod, and a lighter (f/9) 300mm lens.

Marc!

lfpf
4-Sep-2014, 12:04
Not much when carrying, I'd rather enjoy the walk.
In/on a Kelty Redwing 2900, lately:
*Gitzo G1349 Mk2 carbon fiber tripod and 410 Bogen head attached,
*Linhof IV, a lensboard,
*3 B&L Protars (~7", 4" and 3.5"), 2.0 ND gels and holder, rarely a 250 6.7 Fuji if needed,
*no meter (film/sunlight/exposure/dev are consistent). If early/late/overcast add 1-2 stops, maybe boost dev a bit,
*compass, GPS, 2M steel tape for xyzt and direction
*log book, pencil
*4/5 film holders for the day, maybe a Super Rollex 56x72
*miscellaneous conveniences plus water, a water filter, assorted clif bars, whistle, 1st aid junk, signal mirror, yup, duct tape
The miscellaneous list changes with the plan. The point is keep it good, keep it light, git 'er done and don't sweat the small stuff.
When too much/not enough, then tripod stays behind in rocky country (+rag for on-site sandbag or overnight tarp)

Sal Santamaura
4-Sep-2014, 15:35
Or you could have just added to this existing thread:


http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?31080-Show-your-bag

:D:DWhoever merged the threads -- thanks! It's always easier to search when the archive is "clean."

Racer X 69
6-Sep-2014, 15:17
121226

A wheeled cases just won't go where I need to go. I own two. When on a groomed trail I throw my backpack on this. I can work right out of it at a comfortable height. If I need to leave the groomed trail I fold it up and use a bicycle chain lock to chain it out of sight off the trail and head out with just the backpack.

Is that adapted from a baby stroller?

Kirk Gittings
6-Sep-2014, 16:03
Is that adapted from a baby stroller? Yep.

Christopher Barrett
6-Sep-2014, 16:41
Most all of the bags I've been researching are beyond American's carry-on size allowance. A few are right at the limit (like the Pelicans I use for my commercial work). Are you guys flying with your kits? Which bags are still overhead compliant?

Thanks!
Chris

BradS
6-Sep-2014, 16:47
I fly with the LowePro MiniTrekker classic. Never an issue with it on domestic flights.

Ari
6-Sep-2014, 18:33
Most all of the bags I've been researching are beyond American's carry-on size allowance. A few are right at the limit (like the Pelicans I use for my commercial work). Are you guys flying with your kits? Which bags are still overhead compliant?

Thanks!
Chris

Peli 1510, Lowepro X200 and X100, Tenba Roadie Universal; these are all rolling bags.
I've had to accept that there is no way I'll get my 8x10 on board as carry-on, but before that I did manage to get an entire 4x5 kit in the Peli 1510 as carry-on.

Alan Curtis
7-Sep-2014, 05:01
The photo backpacker P3 fits easily in the overhead bin on every flight I've tried.

Kodachrome25
7-Sep-2014, 21:20
The P3 is quickly becoming my go to pack for 4x5. My wife snapped this tonight as we reached a ridge line at over 13,600 feet to shoot moonrise. Couple hours down via headlamp and near-full moon, great pack, great hike....

121449

Drew Bedo
8-Sep-2014, 05:48
Chris:


There are many good suggestions on this merged thread. I get 23 pounds of 4x5 gear into a bag that fits under the seat. See my post on the previous page. I use a LoweProMagnum 35, but there are other (newer) bags from LowePro and other brands that will fit the under-seat and over-head size limits.

I like this package because it not only travels on a plane, but can fit on my lap if need be while riding on a bus. One thing to watch out for on regional airlines is that the over-head can be too small and the bag has to be "gate-checked" into the hold anyway!

I am sure that you will find something that works for you and your shooting outfit.

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 06:32
Most all of the bags I've been researching are beyond American's carry-on size allowance. A few are right at the limit (like the Pelicans I use for my commercial work). Are you guys flying with your kits? Which bags are still overhead compliant?

Thanks!
Chris

F-Stop Gear Tilopa BC (http://shop.fstopgear.com/us/products/mountain/backpacks/tilopa-bc.html#.VA2vbGPiP18). Great pack. I own two.

Christopher Barrett
8-Sep-2014, 07:16
This thread has been really helpful! I had almost settled on a Thinktank Airport... they have a model with wheels that would be nice for long hauls through the airport. With the F-Stop, though, their X-Large ICU module will fit perfectly into one of my Peli roll-aboards. Then I can pack my clothes in the Tilopa and check that as baggage. I'll swap everything out before going shooting and have my full kit available without having the weight of a roller system while out hiking. Awesome!

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 07:25
This thread has been really helpful! I had almost settled on a Thinktank Airport... they have a model with wheels that would be nice for long hauls through the airport. With the F-Stop, though, their X-Large ICU module will fit perfectly into one of my Peli roll-aboards. Then I can pack my clothes in the Tilopa and check that as baggage. I'll swap everything out before going shooting and have my full kit available without having the weight of a roller system while out hiking. Awesome!

My favorite feature of the Tilopa, is the fact that the main compartment opens from the back. With other packs that open form the front, the back side ends up getting dirty and wet when you put it down (especially this time of year when the ground is soaked in dew every morning) - then the wet/dirty goes against you back when you put the pack back on. With the Tilopa, the front gets wet/dirty and the back stays clean and dry.

Kodachrome25
8-Sep-2014, 09:30
F-Stop Gear Tilopa BC (http://shop.fstopgear.com/us/products/mountain/backpacks/tilopa-bc.html#.VA2vbGPiP18). Great pack. I own two.

They certainly are great looking packs, I was looking at the Satori for multi-day back country work but decided against it for a few reasons.

While feature rich it would seem F-Stop takes the same one size fits all torsos approach to the overall length of the pack....this makes an *enormous* difference in carrying loads over 20 pounds on a trip like the famous "Four Pass Loop" (http://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/whiteriver/recreation/ohv/recarea/?recid=40555&actid=29) that I did twice in one week for a magazine article about 12 years ago. It does not matter how adjustable those shoulder straps and waist belt are if your torso length is off by 1.5 to 3 inches, the weight won't transfer to your hips correctly if this is the case.

The other things are that as nice as the back panel access is, and I have 4 packs like that, it affects the fit, sometimes a little, sometimes a lot, usually weight dependent, it's a compromise that can end up killing your back with heavy loads. And finally, I like the idea of the shallow or slope inserts for when you need to pack things that are more important than camera gear on a pro driven outing, but with no access to that gear from the other side ( that I know of ) other than pulling all the gear out of the top of the pack first to get to what is behind it, well what is the point?

I'd be interested in hearing from folks who have used this system overnight and with loads over 30 pounds in terms of how it does in real world, high exertion back country activities....

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 09:44
They certainly are great looking packs, I was looking at the Satori for multi-day back country work but decided against it for a few reasons.

While feature rich it would seem F-Stop takes the same one size fits all torsos approach to the overall length of the pack....this makes an *enormous* difference in carrying loads over 20 pounds on a trip like the famous "Four Pass Loop" (http://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/whiteriver/recreation/ohv/recarea/?recid=40555&actid=29) that I did twice in one week for a magazine article about 12 years ago. It does not matter how adjustable those shoulder straps and waist belt are if your torso length is off by 1.5 to 3 inches, the weight won't transfer to your hips correctly if this is the case.

The other things are that as nice as the back panel access is, and I have 4 packs like that, it affects the fit, sometimes a little, sometimes a lot, usually weight dependent, it's a compromise that can end up killing your back with heavy loads. And finally, I like the idea of the shallow or slope inserts for when you need to pack things that are more important than camera gear on a pro driven outing, but with no access to that gear from the other side ( that I know of ) other than pulling all the gear out of the top of the pack first to get to what is behind it, well what is the point?

I'd be interested in hearing from folks who have used this system overnight and with loads over 30 pounds in terms of how it does in real world, high exertion back country activities....

I'm average in height so generally do not have fitting issues with my packs.

I don't do overnighters with this pack. I don;t think that is what this thread is about. But I do average about 30 lbs. for most of my outings which include extended hikes up steep terrain, usually up to low class IV. I probably would not use this for class V climbing since I would use my climbing pack for that and take less gear (certainly not LF).

The F-Stop packs were designed by adventure photographers for adventure photographers. So they carry well and carry photography gear well. They were so overwhelmed with demand that they could not keep these bags in stock until recently.

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 10:08
It also has an internal aluminum frame, so I have never had an issue related to the back panel access.

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 10:12
There's also top access, and 2 front panel zippered pockets. I usually put my Mountain Hardware goretex shell in one of the front pockets, and food on top. I use the laptop pocket for a camelback style bladder and there is a velcro'd tube opening to feed the tube out and down a shoulder strap. There has never been a case where i had to pull the icu out to get to other gear.

Kodachrome25
8-Sep-2014, 10:53
There's also top access, and 2 front panel zippered pockets. I usually put my Mountain Hardware goretex shell in one of the front pockets, and food on top. I use the laptop pocket for a camelback style bladder and there is a velcro'd tube opening to feed the tube out and down a shoulder strap. There has never been a case where i had to pull the icu out to get to other gear.

Thanks Greg!

Like I said, they look like great packs but they do tout the two larger ones being "overnight" and that will always get my attention because that is a tough balance to strike. I am still considering one for Winter use ( Loka ) since my two Lowepro's don't hold boards or skiis very well. Also, when you say top access, that is not access to the main compartment is it, because that would make a difference in getting behind the gear insert.


I don't do overnighters with this pack. I don;t think that is what this thread is about.

It's a merged thread that started in 2007, it's kind of what ever it needs to be at this point I would say....

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 11:12
Also, when you say top access, that is not access to the main compartment is it, because that would make a difference in getting behind the gear insert.


There's actually a top pocket that is self-contained, plus a separate top zipper that is for access to the main compartment. I find no need to stuff anything behind the ICU, but on occasion, and as needed, I do stuff things along the sides, such as my toilet kit (TP, ziploc bags for used TP, and cleanser). A nice benefit if the ICU is you can swap out the ICU for a smaller or larger size. So on a longer hike where I minimize my gear, I put in a medium ICU instead of my large ICU, which leaves more space internally for more comfort gear.

Christopher Barrett
8-Sep-2014, 11:23
Greg, I'm looking at the XL ICU to hold my 4x10 kit. It looks as though the topmost portion of that may be less accessible from the main flap in the back. You have any experience with that?

Greg Miller
8-Sep-2014, 12:01
Greg, I'm looking at the XL ICU to hold my 4x10 kit. It looks as though the topmost portion of that may be less accessible from the main flap in the back. You have any experience with that?

Hi Christopher,

I have attached a photo of my XL UCI in a Tilopa BC. You can see that the top cells are hidden a bit. This is exaggerated because you will also see that I tuck the lid of the ICU underneath the ICU, which raises everything else up - I think most people do not do this and just leave the lid unzipped which provides more protection to gear in a rainy or windy day - I'm just a bit lazy... The obstruction isn't as bad as it looks because the material is flexible so you can still get items in and out of the top cells. I tend to stick smaller items up in there which also alleviates the obstruction to some degree.

121494

Christopher Barrett
8-Sep-2014, 12:34
Cool, thanks for that.

CB

Kodachrome25
8-Sep-2014, 12:37
Greg, I'm looking at the XL ICU to hold my 4x10 kit. It looks as though the topmost portion of that may be less accessible from the main flap in the back. You have any experience with that?

Christopher, I just got off the phone with F-Stop and one thing that was mentioned was a ICU called the "Monster" that is not yet listed on the site, I am not sure how much larger it is but one really great thing about it is that it also has a top access point that would make it a lot easier to get into areas of the ICU that would otherwise be hidden by the pack's structure.

I'd give them a call, super helpful and knowledgeable. I am pretty sure I am putting in an order for a Loka with the small Pro ICU, rain cover and water bladder pouch for ski season. I chose it over the Tilopa because the 3 side MOLLE straps will easily hold my Photobackpacker film holder cases if I use it for that application....

Drew Bedo
9-Sep-2014, 08:01
Chris: I have done that too: Packed all my gear in a Pellican roll-around carry on and put the LowePro shoulder bag into my checked bag stuffed full of socks and shirts. That way, if the Pellican has to be Gate-Checked into the hold I have slightly less anxiety.

Kodachrome25
9-Sep-2014, 16:41
Well hot damn, I have completely redone my packs for photo gear....

I just ordered a Tilopa BC ( Blue ) with the small and medium ICU, rain cover and hydration pouch. I went for the Tilopa due to it being deep enough to take my Photobackpacker 4x5 case lying flat on top of the small ICU. Between this and the P3 kit, I am uber covered for every format in every configuration....

But wow....$1,500 in packs and related...good thing this is tax write off, LOL!

Kodachrome25
12-Sep-2014, 20:20
Took delivery of the F-Stop Tilopa BC today, nice pack, well built, killer feature set.

But the unexpected surprise was that my Chamonix 45N2 fit in the small insert, no need to pack it outside the insert in it's own case, woot! I loaded it up with my standard tripod, 4 lenses, 6x12 Horseman back and one RPT 4x5 film holder Cascade w/ 6 holders in the main compartment. The P3 side pouches easily fit outside the pack on the side strap areas so if I wanted to go that route, I could.

I took it for a one mile spin just to see how it all felt and while decent ( much better than the Lowepro 15L, AW 200 ), it was not as comfortable as the Photobackpacker P3. This is not so say it is not comfortable, just that the P3 is bar none the most comfortable fitting pack on the market, especially loading it up above 20 pounds. The primary reason for this is that the Tilopa BC is a panel loader, great for getting to the gear in that manner, but you sacrifice the amazing design of a suspension like the one on the P3, especially as the hip belt stops further away from the spine allowing the zipper access to the gear.

I mean...big, BIG hats off to Bruce Laughton for insisting on a really good suspension on the P3.

But for light-ish excursions with 4x5, medium format, mixed DSLR & MF, this pack will be great, especially in ski mode. I'm taking it up a 14,000 foot peak tomorrow with my Mamiya 6 kit, light-medium CF tripod and about 15 rolls ( one pound ) of film. We'll see how it goes!

121769

Sal Santamaura
13-Sep-2014, 14:35
Yes indeed it includes...a 350 G-Claron...What lensboard do you have the 355 G-Claron mounted on? How well does it 'play' with the Phillips front standard? Thanks in advance.

Kodachrome25
13-Sep-2014, 19:16
The Tilopa BC rode awesome with 24 pounds in it, a quick cruise up to 14,000 feet today, only 2,100 vertical from a high parking spot. Tomorrow's jaunt will be three 14,000 foot summits for a total of 15 miles and 7,800 vertical....that ought to tell the real story, lol!

Kirk Gittings
13-Sep-2014, 21:41
What lensboard do you have the 355 G-Claron mounted on? How well does it 'play' with the Phillips front standard? Thanks in advance.

My dyslexic bad. It is a 305 G-Claron, fits the Phillips lensboard fine and one of the resons I like the Phillips is that it has the most rigid front standard of any camera I have ever used.