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Colin Corneau
21-Nov-2007, 15:34
Can anyone tell me about this tripod?

I have a Shen Hao 4x5, with a 180mm lens, by way of cameras. These seem OK but I'd like some real-world advice before dropping some dough on a product.

It also seems to make sense to get a tripod head with a quick release plate I can keep on the camera...any help there also would garner you a free pint (offer conditional on us being in the same city!)

http://www.bigcameraworkshops.com/default2.asp

George E. Sheils
21-Nov-2007, 15:41
I have a Berlebach 3032 Tripod in Nutwood colour and it is both beautiful to look at and steady as a rock. Not very heavy either. It would easily hold the Shen Hao and any lens that you place on it.


Btw, I carry it with a Optech strap which clips around the built in levelling head on one end and around the feet at the other end. I then carry it rifle-style over one shoulder with camera in place. So quick and easy.

Don't suppose you'll be in Dublin, Ireland anytime soon to buy me a pint?

Colin Corneau
21-Nov-2007, 15:45
I'm afraid you'll have to take an IOU on that pint, George but rest assured I'm good for it. If you want I can drink it by proxy for you...

BradS
21-Nov-2007, 16:08
I have an 8043 model and really love it. The leveling base it wonderful! The 8043 is strong and relatively light weight for its max load rating. I have sed it for...every view camera I've owned including the 5x7 B&J (probably the heaviest camera I've owned at just under eleven pounds). It easily accomodates the Canham wood field (at around six pounds?).

Since I have had a long and lasting commitment to the six sided Bogen/Manfrotto quick release system on my view cameras, I chose to add a simple Bogen Manfrotto quick release adapter to the top of the Berlebach center column. I have no need for a (heavy) tripod head proper....

The one thing I wish I could change about the 8043 that I bought?...the mounting screw. The one I got from B&H (or was it Adorama?) has a 1/4 -20 screw.

Oh, and the center column. By default it comes with a pretty long center column. Shorter and longer center columns are avaialble but their kinda $$ if bought after the fact. I simply took a hack saw to the bottom end of mine. It cleaned up nice and I doubt you could even tell.

I wish I had been able or had the foresite to get a center column with a 3/8 - 16 camera mounting screw and that is literally my only complaint about the Berlebach 8043....well, that and I wish I could get its little brother the 7043 for travel. Although relatively light and compact, the 8043 is too big to throw in even my biggest suit case. The 7043 isn't readily available in the US...for some bizarre reason. I wish it were. I'd buy one in a minute.

BradS
21-Nov-2007, 16:11
The quick release thingy is shown here (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/269979-REG/Bogen_Manfrotto_625_625_Quick_Release_Adapter.html). It is a Bogen/Manfrotto 625 (old number 3296).

Fred L
21-Nov-2007, 17:04
Colin,

Buying more gear are you ? I have the 3042 and 8023.

I like the built in ballhead on the 3042 as most of my lf work is not tilted very much front/back or side/side. The length is a beeoch though. I use a Manfrotto (Bogen) 357 Pro Video QR Adapter. The dovetail slides into the qr and has a safety catch preventing it from dropping out the other end. Love it and works fine for my 8x10.

The 8023 length is very nice for packing/ travelling. The head is simple column which would need a proper head.

What I ended up doing was swapping out the legs so the ballhead has the three section legs. Haven't tried the 8x10 on the three legger so that may be a short lived swap but will see.

I've never had probs with Berlebachs and doubt you would either.

That makes several pints you owe me comrade.


ttyl

Ed K.
21-Nov-2007, 17:09
I have two Berlebach tripods - one single extension for 26lb cameras and one triple extension reporter model. Both are well crafted, very rigid and light weight plus easy to set up. They cost much less than other wood pods. Both have the leveling ball, which I like because I can either use it as-is to keep the camera close to the top of the pod (reduces leverage on the pod) or I can put a regular head on if I like.

I recommend that you avoid the octagonal, cheap plates as quick releases. I use the slide-in design for video cameras that has a thumbscrew lock and safety - it will never, ever, come off unless I want it to, and it does not wiggle as the octagonal and rectangular quick releases do. Setup is a breeze and the whole kit is solid as a rock. Both tripods work fine for 8x10 use, however I use the larger two-extension one for longer lenses and higher winds.

With the slim height of the video quick release, the tripod is much sturdier than a boat anchor Gitzo metal pod that I have but without the difficulty to extend the legs (easy set screw type leg locking on Berlebach, twist lock on the Gitzo).

Can't beat Berlebach for value. Build quality is excellent, prices are very reasonable.

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
21-Nov-2007, 18:31
I wish I could get its little brother the 7043 for travel. Although relatively light and compact, the 8043 is too big to throw in even my biggest suit case. The 7043 isn't readily available in the US...for some bizarre reason. I wish it were. I'd buy one in a minute.

You can have your dealer order any Berlebach product. While we do not stock all their products (we are introducing two of their pan heads next month) we are more then happy to special order the items that we do not stock. Delivery time is normally about 30 days and your dealer would have to call us for prices.

Laurent
22-Nov-2007, 02:22
I'm very happy with a Berlebach for my Tachihara. Mine has no column but a leveling head, and I do not miss the column at all.

It is very light, and stable more than enough for my Tachi .

Ron Bose
22-Nov-2007, 06:41
Do Berlebach extension legs fallout if you forget to re-tighten the clamp after extending the leg ?

My Ries J100-2 has a second clamp thingy and so can't ever slip out, the H100 however isn't the same ...

Goins3rd
22-Nov-2007, 08:57
I have the Berlebach Report 4012, and the Manfrotto 410 head. It is gorgeous, sturdy, and durable. I scout my scenes with a digital P/S, then go back with the Berlebach/camera and make the picture.
You will be happy, and get lots of compliments.

Robert Skeoch
22-Nov-2007, 12:22
I have a 4002. It's a great tripod and I use it for my 8x10 when I'm driving to the shoot.
When I fly I use a 8003, because it's smaller when closed. Either would work fine for a 4x5.

I have pics/discription of the most popular models on my site... plus I'm in Canada.

-Rob
www.bigcameraworkshops.com

Andrew_4548
22-Nov-2007, 14:53
I have an Report 8033 in nutwood tripod for supporting an Ebony 45SU and it's great. I had it modified from standard to make it the same height as the Manfrotto I was replacing. It was simply an email to Berlebach asking them to quote for the different spec and delivery to the UK - no problem and it came through in a couple of weeks. I've since tweaked it to put the Manfrotto spiked/rubber feet on rather than the Berlebach ones as the "rubber" is actually hard plastic which I felt would slide on hard floors when I'm doing indoor architecture shots.

I got the levelling head as I felt it would come in more useful than the centre column - I always felt it was a weakness on the Manfrotto 055. Not having the centre column also allows me to get down really close to the ground if needed. The leg clamps are great for when you've got gloves on when it's cold. OK, it's not quick-release leg adjustment but I'm not in that much of a rush...

Andrew

Kevin Klazek
22-Nov-2007, 15:53
I have the 3002 model and use it for 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10. It is overkill for the 4x5 and handles the 8x10 with ease. Rock solid. This model has no center column so that saves a bit of weight. I agree with Andrew that the plastic feet are slippery indoors. I was thinking of using rubber ends for table legs to fix that issue. Outdoors the metal spike feet work great. All in all a great pod for a great price.

Ron, the legs do not fall off if you forget to tighten them. There is a mechanical stop that prevents this.

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
22-Nov-2007, 16:25
Do Berlebach extension legs fallout if you forget to re-tighten the clamp after extending the leg ?

My Ries J100-2 has a second clamp thingy and so can't ever slip out, the H100 however isn't the same ...

No. There is a stop screw at the ends of the legs so they can't fall out.

athanasius80
22-Nov-2007, 22:39
I have a 3032 bought used and its a great tripod. It easily supported my 5x7 Korona with the extension rail maxed out. It can probably handle a wooden 8x10 without any trouble. Buy one!

Void
18-Jan-2008, 14:46
Hello

1. I've got interested in Berlebach tripod. I am 1.85m high, so I consider 1.65m tripod too short. That leads me to conclusion that I will need to buy a model with a center column, [sigh].
Can You tell me which model is the highest not counting the center column extension in?
I consider the 4022 model. Any advices against it? I want to take it with 3/8" thread.

2. The accessories. I am just starting, so I have nothing, just a 4x5 Plaubel Profia camera. Should I get also something from the accessories to be really able to use that tripod?
I prefer to but tripod head later.


I hope it will be high quality enough to pass it to grandson later ;)
I would try Reis, by the prices are too high for me, and the producer is far far away in USA, behind big water, VAT and custom fees.

Andrew_4548
18-Jan-2008, 17:56
Void,

As I mentioned in my post above, Berlebach can custom make a tripod for you. Send them your desired modifications and allow them to quote for the difference in price and lead time - neither were much more than standard and the tripod actually came earlier than I was expecting from the delivery estimate.

Andrew

Michael Graves
18-Jan-2008, 18:22
Two Berlebachs. Love 'em both. But like you, I'm shopping around for a QR head.

CG
18-Jan-2008, 22:57
I got a Berlebach 3032. Strong attractive solid reasonably priced, but ultimately, not quite what I wanted.

I've used, and I guess gotten very used to, a Bogen/Manfroto 3236 tripod with the ?3047? ( I can't remember the number ) 3 way tilt heavy duty head. I really like the wide leg spread and the ability to lock the legs at any spread. It feels incredibly stable. Heavy too, but...

So the Berlebach doesn't lock other than at a rather narrow leg spread, and I just haven't been able to get to like it. Habit. Wish I liked it more, but I don't. I tried using a chain to lock the legs at a more wide open spread, but the assembly is too wiggly during setup for me. I really like the positive locking on the 3032s and want that on any future tripods.

I am so taken with the leg spread and locking issues that I bought a second Bogen/Manfroto 3236 and added the Sinar pan tilt head, for use with LF. I'm not a fan of the Bogen hex quick release plate with heavy big cameras, though I love it with small stuff - MF and 35...

Despite all, the Berlebach tripods should be wonderful for a lot of people - I'd be using mine had it positive locks. I "lent" mine to a young person who's just getting into LF, who was using a too light weight item as a stopgap. I think the Berlebach was a real step up for him. I can heartliy recommend the Berlebach tripods to anyone who isn't hung up on the positive leg locks. It does feel like worthy piece of gear.

C

Michael Graves
19-Jan-2008, 06:18
I have a 3032 bought used and its a great tripod. It easily supported my 5x7 Korona with the extension rail maxed out. It can probably handle a wooden 8x10 without any trouble. Buy one!

I have the 3032 with a Gitzo R3 head and my 810M is quite steady on it. I used to have a 2D and it was fine.

Colin Corneau
19-Jan-2008, 10:57
I ended up getting the 8023, and picked up a Manfrotto QR head, a basic 3way pan and tilt.

Pretty happy with the purchase (and the service, Rob Skeoch, thanks) although I've only used it a few times. The real test will be travelling with it in a month's time.

Thanks for all the great help, folks

Dakotah Jackson
20-Jan-2008, 14:22
If someone has had both, how do they compare to the Ries tripods?

Geary Lyons
20-Jan-2008, 14:38
If someone has had both, how do they compare to the Ries tripods?

Well I'll throw another variable into the mix to answer. My Berlebach, 3 section leg, is for 4x4 mymy light weight 5x7 Pocket Expedition. The Berlebach is light, very stable and the default for packing or travel. I have used it with a KMV 8x10 with good performance and results. The 2 section Berlebach, would likely, be a bit more stable for a heavier camera such as the KMV, but misses my "compactness" requirement for travel.

I have an older Ries, heavy, stable, heavy, slower to work with, heavy, and uncomfortable to carry on my shoulders, because of the leg profile and , (did I mention that it is heavy?), even for short distances. I use an old wooden Miller for 8x10. It is lighter, than the Ries, , much easier to use. The rounded leg profile makes it much less bothersome when carried in the field, even with the camera attached to the head.

Cheers,
Geary

Dave Moeller
22-Jan-2008, 12:49
1. I've got interested in Berlebach tripod. I am 1.85m high, so I consider 1.65m tripod too short. That leads me to conclusion that I will need to buy a model with a center column, [sigh].

I'm 2.0m tall, and the Berlebach 4032 is plenty tall for me. There's no center column, just a leveling ball on the top. Remember that you're going to be looking at the ground glass on top of the tripod, which is slightly higher than the top of the tripod head.

Before I set up an 8x10 on the Berlebach, I usually lower the tripod legs a few inches to make working with the camera easier.

Void
22-Jan-2008, 15:06
I'm 2.0m tall, and the Berlebach 4032 is plenty tall for me.

That's exactly the information and experience I wanted to read about. Thank You.



Before I set up an 8x10 on the Berlebach, I usually lower the tripod legs a few inches to make working with the camera easier.

I have a 4x5, so a little lower this case.

Mick Fagan
23-Jan-2008, 01:44
Dave, I too have been trying to figure out just how high in the real world, these tripods with their inbuilt ball would be. That explanation is perfect.

I have been trying to figure out whether the 4032 or the 9033 would be alright. As I'm requiring the smallest carrying length, I've been thinking of the 9033, but it's slightly lower in height, 154cm versus 165cm.

Are their tripod measurement heights on these models taken from the actual tripod, or from the actual base on top of the ball? the answer may swing it one way or the other.

I'm 172.5cm tall, so I'm not really sure which way to go.

Mick.

Void
23-Jan-2008, 04:30
@Dave Moeller: Do You need a head additionaly, when You can use the ball on top of 4032 model?
I think a simple one would be usefull. Is there a tripod head with only one-way tilt, but sturdy, can bear a 10kg, and preferably old & cheap?

Dave Moeller
23-Jan-2008, 06:50
I just use the leveling ball that's on the top of the 4032, and I usually only use it to get a level platform for a camera. The head's very stable, and tilts up to 30 degrees in any direction. I have made a few shots with the leveling ball pointed down, but for the vast majority of my work I start with a level camera. (For reference, my 8x10 setup with camera, lens, and film holder, probably weighs in around 22-24 pounds...right around 10 Kg.)

Whether or not you need a tripod head with the Berlebach leveling head really depends on how you use your camera. For me it's a non-issue, but I'm sure many people require more flexibility than I do.

Best of luck.

Void
25-Jan-2008, 04:37
I have also found that company http://www.wooden-tripods.com/. Their products look very simillar to Berlebach's. Have someone compared them?

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
25-Jan-2008, 07:13
I have also found that company http://www.wooden-tripods.com/. Their products look very simillar to Berlebach's. Have someone compared them?

Those are the old Wolf tripods.

As advance info for PMA we will introduce Berlebach tripods and monopds in camouflage as standard stock items as well as two new Berlebach pan heads, a 2-way with a Berlebach quick release plate system and a new 3-way pan head with an Arca compatible quick release system. Also new will be the Berlebach version of an Arca quick release system and plates and the Berlebach ground spike. All of these items would be available through any of our dealers.

Void
25-Jan-2008, 07:33
Those are the old Wolf tripods.
I don't understand that. Are they out of bussiness? Where then are the new Wolf tripods?
What stands "PMA" and "we" for?

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
25-Jan-2008, 08:16
I don't understand that. Are they out of bussiness? Where then are the new Wolf tripods?
What stands "PMA" and "we" for?

Wolf made tripods from the old pre-reunification tools from the original Berlebach factory.

PMA is the Photo Marketing Association which holds it annual show in Las Vegas next week. It also holds shows in other venues around the world. It is the USA's largest dealer photo show.

We are the distributor for Berlebach in the USA.

Void
25-Jan-2008, 09:54
Thank You for the explanation.


Wolf made tripods from the old pre-reunification tools from the original Berlebach factory.
So they wouldn't make them anymore? I still don't understand it.

Will the new pan head be able to support 10kg camera?

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
25-Jan-2008, 10:21
Thank You for the explanation.


So they wouldn't make them anymore? I still don't understand it.

Will the new pan head be able to support 10kg camera?

Wolf should still be in business. Will see at the next Photokina in September. Unless someone here has current status on them.

The new heads are rated to about 11 lbs. so that is in the 5kg range. The only head they sell in the 10 KG range is te Magic Ball.

alec4444
25-Jan-2008, 20:01
Haven't tried the Berlebachs - but as far as Reis is concerned...

They're sturdy as hell and ungodly heavy. I got a new one for my 11x14 (A100 with A250 head) and it's nearly overkill for the 30lb. camera. I could hit it with a bat during a 10 sec exposure and end up with a perfectly sharp picture.

While I'm still trying to find a head for my carbon fiber tripod, I've been using the A100 / A250 setup on my 10lb. 5x7....and it's hilarious. Until, of course, I get home with my extremely sore back...

Quality is brilliant, but if you're looking to carry it anywhere, fuhgetaboutit.

--A

Mick Fagan
25-Jan-2008, 20:25
The Wolf web site is interesting as they show their two legged tripod, an interesting play on words.

My late father in-law had a tripod that looked like the wolf tripods, he used it on the Russian front, he thought it was the best material for extreme heat and extreme cold, timber that is!

Mick.

AA3NK
5-Jul-2011, 15:24
Greetings All,

I have just acquired a Sinar P and am learning to set it up, so to speak. My Manfrotto 055XPROB does not appear to be enough tripod and there seems a bewildering variation of tripod themes and model numbers. So, being a retro sort of person the Berlebach quickly caught my eye. The reviews and comments on this site have spoken well about them and I am giving measured consideration to a 3032 that is listed on KEH. Since most, if not all, of you know a LOT more about the camera and gear than I do, let me know what you think.

I am 6'0" so the height is probably Ok and if I put a head on it after the fact it will certainly be tall enough. The intended use of the format is still life, landscape, and occasional portrait.

There are a lot of nice used Bogen/Manfrotto deals around for $250 or less that might be just as serviceable.

Thanks for your consideration
Bob

Alan Gales
5-Jul-2011, 17:38
I have used a Ries A100 with A250 double tilt head, J100 with J250 double tilt head and Berlebach Report 3042 with center column and no head.

Both Ries and Berlebach make beautiful very well made tripods. You really can't go wrong with either one. Personally, I prefer the Ries for the leg locks. I can lock the legs in any position and the tripod is rock steady.

Michael E
5-Jul-2011, 17:47
I use three Berlebachs. For a Sinar P, I would consider the Report series too weak. It won't collapse, but wobble quite a bit. The Uni series would be much better suited. They are much heavier, but a Sinar P is not a featherweight, either.

Michael

Alan Gales
5-Jul-2011, 18:57
I use three Berlebachs. For a Sinar P, I would consider the Report series too weak. It won't collapse, but wobble quite a bit. The Uni series would be much better suited. They are much heavier, but a Sinar P is not a featherweight, either.

Michael

I was answering Colin's original question from 2007! I need to start paying more attention to when these things start. :D

AA3NK
10-Jul-2011, 14:06
Upon reconsideration, I think you are right about the Berlebach 3032 being light for the requirement. I put the P on the bathroom scale, it weighs in at 14.7Lbs. What a beast. So, time to rethink the prospects, maybe a Bogen 3046 or 3033 can handle the mass. I had been encouraged about using a 3047 head but it's not up to the weight standard, whereas, the 3039 may work Ok.

Not being real spun up on the models and so forth, I am not clear on what the Uni model is, a variant of Berlebach line is my guess.

Meanwhile, thanks for the insight, I have not been around this sort of equipment since 1979. In those days a P would cost about as much as some cars!

Bob

Two23
10-Jul-2011, 14:51
I have a medium duty Berlebach but didn't use it once I bought a Gitzo 1325. However, so far this year I have been taking the Berlebach along to put my Shen Hao on. They just go together so nicely. If Berlebach is now making Arca Swiss QR compatible heads, that's just great. I've completely switched all my cameras over to that now. The Gitzo does everything and does it excellently, but the Berlebach remains my best tripod for use in wind. It can be very windy here.


Kent in SD

AA3NK
10-Jul-2011, 16:11
The 1325 appears to be serviceable and, from what I have read, it handles around 26 pounds, probably a lot easier to move around. The downtic is the bounty required to have one. Photography is something I do because I like it. The little iPhone in my shirt pocket is getting way too much of my time :eek:

Two23
10-Jul-2011, 17:29
The 1325 appears to be serviceable and, from what I have read, it handles around 26 pounds, probably a lot easier to move around. The downtic is the bounty required to have one.


I've owned a number of tripods in the past. I bought the 1325 about seven years ago, and I'll say this. Might well be the last tripod I ever buy. It's now seen four different cameras come & go. It does everything perfectly, every time, no matter what the conditions.


Kent in SD

Bob Salomon - HP Marketing
11-Jul-2011, 01:19
I have a medium duty Berlebach but didn't use it once I bought a Gitzo 1325. However, so far this year I have been taking the Berlebach along to put my Shen Hao on. They just go together so nicely. If Berlebach is now making Arca Swiss QR compatible heads, that's just great. I've completely switched all my cameras over to that now. The Gitzo does everything and does it excellently, but the Berlebach remains my best tripod for use in wind. It can be very windy here.


Kent in SD
Berlebach does make Arca compatible heads. Some are for sale on our factory store.

http://hpmarketingstore.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2&zenid=o4lm831v5go07rqqtrols292i7

Emmanuel BIGLER
11-Jul-2011, 03:49
original question from 2007! I need to start paying more attention

Yes, but on the other hand it is quite meaningful to re-visit a discussion on equipment after a few years to see if the choice, in the long term, was good or bad.

For example, I have been using a Berlebach Nr. 8013, 3 sections, plain head without central column for longer than the present discussion (I bought it used-but-like-new from a good friend in Nov. 2003) and 7-1/2 years later I'm still absolutely satisfied and can recommend it without any restriction, at least for the kind of relatively light-weight equipment I use and outdoor pictures I take. Nr. 8013 weights 2.2 kg (4.85 lbs) without head and is rated @10kg (22 lbs) of working load.

The only additions I made are:
- a solid ballhead
- 3 rubber inserts, @$.99 each, (designed for metallic chairs) to cover the plastic 'feet'.

I use Nr. 8013, @70% with a light weight 4x5" view camera, for backpacking; and the rest with not-too-heavy medium format equipement, again to be carried in my backpack. I never missed the fact that I have no central column. I had the option with the 3/8" screw, so mounting the ballhead was direct without any threaded insert. If you know in advance which head you'll mount on top of your Berlerlach, do not forget that you can have it factory-fitted with a 3/8" screw as an option.
The friend from which I bought this tripod had acquired the original Berlebach tripod bag in canvas. This bag has proven to be extremely strong, The only minor complain being that there is no separate accessory pocket to keep various accessories that you always need with your tripod.

If I had to buy a new Berlabach tripod now for any view camera, forgetting about all my previous experience, I think I would certainly consider the option with the built-in ballhead, or levelling head. There are two models, a small one (e.g. Nr. 3032) (http://www.berlebach.de/?bereich=details&id=289&sprache=english) and a big one (about 100 mm - 4" in diameter ! e.g. ref. UNI 26) for big tripods that I saw on display at the 2010 Photokina in Cologne (http://www.berlebach.de/?bereich=details&id=231&sprache=english). The built-in ballhed only adds its radius to the height of the "bare" tripod, so you can add any head on top of it without compromising the stability of the whole ensemble.

I can also say that the Berlebach booth at the 2010 Photokina was impressive !
Should I say : too many models, too many options ? ;)

Consumers are never satisfied: if you offer them a limited choice, they complain ! If you offer them all the options to satisfy even the most eccentric user, they complain again ! ;)

ki6mf
11-Jul-2011, 04:39
Had one for 4 years, they work, buy it!