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ljsegil
30-Sep-2007, 11:10
I am contemplating a purchase of a Photobackpacker system for my Master Technika, far too many lenses, film holders and backs, and other gear. Because I am a bit (lot!) of a gearhound, I was planning to purchase their largest backpack to carry the gear I already have as well as what I may accumulate in the future. However, when I check the airline regs, it looks like the Kelty 3100 that PBP offers is definitely over the usual size limits, and even the two smaller Kelty packs exceed the 45" total dimension limit that most airlines use (I have not been able to find dimensions for the Granite packs listed for sale on the PBP website, but they are almost certainly even larger than the Kelty). Am I overestimating the size pack I will need for a Technika, six-eight lenses (only the 72XL is particularly large), the usual film carriers and backs (I would like to be able to carry the Da Yi 6x17 film back when I travel), and other assorted necessities (like maybe even a light meter)? I do plan to talk to the people at Photobackpacker if I can ever get some time during the week to get their guidance. Do airlines treat backpack dimensions differently when they assess them as carry on luggage? Does anyone have any experience trying to get large backpacks with their gear onto planes? How about checking LF gear? Perhaps it is not quite as obviously valuable as the 35mm gear the TSA employees are used to stealing out of checked luggage (yes, it happened to me)?
Anyway, I would certainly appreciate hearing of others' traveling experiences, their solutions, and I suppose failures, before I commit to a new system that may not be able to work for my needs.
Thanks,
LJS

PBrooks
30-Sep-2007, 13:12
Hello LJ, I highly recomend the Kelty 3100 pack, with a Technika and 6 lenses. Those multi lens protection containers they offer and containers for the camera will both provid excellent protection and organization. I recently went to Taiwan with my Kelty 3100 with 8x10 system, no problems with airport security, just let it go through the scanner. The kelty 3100 should also be big enough that you could get a second container thing for you film holders, plus the additional storage on that thing is unbelievable. Just my 2 cents but I'm waiting on the ULF pack they promised to produce.

eric black
30-Sep-2007, 15:05
I have a Lowepro Nature Trekker that I have never had a problem with filling and getting it onboard. I typically attach the tripod and then put it in the overhead bin seperately. Keep in mind that a tripod head should be packed seperately- my experience is that the head on the tripod is viewed as a weapon and raises alarms. Hope this helps

David A. Goldfarb
30-Sep-2007, 15:12
The DaYi back and viewer are quite bulky. If I travel with my Tech V kit, I usually bring six lenses with me, but if I have the DaYi back, maybe only three or four, and the 6x17 back takes the place of the widest lenses. Usually, though, if I'm short on space and not particularly planning to make lots of panos, I bring an extra wide lens instead of the 6x17 back and plan to crop.

The Tech V lives for the most part a Crumpler Fux Deluxe bag (the largest size, which is now called something else). When I travel, the film and bag with lenses, and my laptop go on board. I check my empty Grafmatics, light meter, and tripod. I also have a small case for things like cams, cable releases, and small tools that seem to catch the airline inspectors' attention, and I put that in my checked luggage, but I leave one cam in the camera, in case my tripod doesn't arrive with me and I might need to shoot handheld for a day (it's happened). I put my carry on bag through the X-ray with film, and usually am not stopped for further inspection. I'm more worried about inspectors opening my film than I am about X-rays.

vinny
30-Sep-2007, 15:26
Getting on a plane with a huge pack is risky. If you get past the counter with it and it won't fit in the overhead compartment, your fuct and have to check it which would result in broken gear for sure. If they don't let you carry it on then you have to go home and re-pack or check it.
I check all of my LF gear in a pelican case that holds my backpack. I highly recommend one. amazon sells them the cheapest. I've made about a dozen round trips with stops in between back to michigan in the last couple years with no problems.

Renato Tonelli
30-Sep-2007, 16:34
Vinny - I've been thinking along these lines as well. So far have carried minimum gear on-board (camera w/3 lenses, a few holders, meter). Which Pelican/backback combination do you use?

Peter Collins
30-Sep-2007, 17:23
You may wish to look at the Osprey Sojourner. It's very well built and is a carry-on with telescoping handle and a hidden, complete backpacking shoulder harness that comes out from behind a panel. I found the harness, etc., to be very comfortable. Construction, quality of wheels, etc., seems very good. This unit is carry-on size and was available this summer at REI--the time I purchased.

I took it to View Camera Conf 07 in Louisville where PBP gear was displayed and bought a series of cases--camera, two lenses, exposure meter--for protecting the gear. And there's still lots of room.

ljsegil
30-Sep-2007, 17:50
Thanks for all the suggestions--now for more questions:
PBrooks--Does the 3100 Kelty fit in the overhead bin? Fully loaded? Any problem with it being well over the 45" size limit?
Vinny--I take it you have not had problems with theft from your checked gear in the Pelican case? Again, as is Renato, I'm curious as to the size of your pack and case and how much gear you are transporting?
Peter--How much gear can the Sojourner hold? Any problems fitting in the overhead bins?
Repeat question for any and all: These backpacks all seem as though they would exceed the 45" limit. Have any of you ever been stopped and had to check your packs? If so, did you have any damage or theft? I get the impression the Photobackpacer stuff would protect the gear pretty well, and that it might take some pretty extreme baggage trauma to hurt the gear. Anybody who has the PBP stuff that can confirm or deny this impression of mine?
Thanks to all,
LJS

Peter Collins
30-Sep-2007, 17:59
Thanks for all the suggestions--now for more questions:

Peter--How much gear can the Sojourner hold? Any problems fitting in the overhead bins?

Repeat question for any and all: These backpacks all seem as though they would exceed the 45" limit. Have any of you ever been stopped and had to check your pack?

Anybody who has the PBP stuff that can confirm or deny this impression of mine?
Thanks to all,
LJS

Answers:
You need to check out the Sojourner yourself. Go online for some dimensions--I recall 22 liter capacity. No way anyone can tell you "how much gear xxx can hold."

Sojourner is explicitly advertised as carry-on compliant.

Have not flown since purchase. Can't refer to ease/difficulty.

PBP rep at the View Camera Conference referred to a customer whose car was rear-ended and totalled, trunk with PBP gear pushed into rear seat. No damage to equipment. Check with PBP people for other war stories if you wish.

Peter Lewin
30-Sep-2007, 19:06
In August I flew Newark/Barcelona and return with PBP lens & camera cases in their modified Kelty 2650. Fit into the overhead easily and no one at either airport said a word; of course I passed the pack (with film) through the scanners at both ends. Tripod was packed separatelty in checked luggage. Of course its dangerous to generalize from one person's experience, and the 2650 is slightly smaller than the 3100, but my experience is one data point.

Brian K
30-Sep-2007, 20:01
22x14x9" 45" total dimension. That is the maximum carry on limit for most airlines.

Frank Petronio
30-Sep-2007, 20:19
FWIW a Pelican hard roller case - the 1510 model I think is the max carry-on size - will hold a lot of gear especially if you pad your gear with wraps and not with the bulky dividers or cut foam. It allows you to wheel your luggage and, if need be, it is sufficiently rugged enough to check on a smaller commuter flight if they give you grief. And you can sit on it in the airport and stand on it to get higher when shooting ;-)

Then you can check your backpack or if you're like me and don't really backpack for miles... shoot with a little daypack full of film, throw the camera and tripod over your shoulder.

But just a suggestion: you have too much stuff.

Ron Marshall
30-Sep-2007, 20:28
I pack my empty backpack in my checked luggage and put my gear into two smaller carry-on bags.

Turner Reich
30-Sep-2007, 20:46
FWIW a Pelican hard roller case - the 1510 model I think is the max carry-on size - will hold a lot of gear especially if you pad your gear with wraps and not with the bulky dividers or cut foam. It allows you to wheel your luggage and, if need be, it is sufficiently rugged enough to check on a smaller commuter flight if they give you grief. And you can sit on it in the airport and stand on it to get higher when shooting ;-)

Then you can check your backpack or if you're like me and don't really backpack for miles... shoot with a little daypack full of film, throw the camera and tripod over your shoulder.

But just a suggestion: you have too much stuff.
__________________

Frank is right, too much stuff, ie lenses. I think Ron has an excellent method; pack an entpy backpack in checked luggage and put the gear in two smaller carry on bags. Put the tripod and or monopod in checked in luggage too. I did something very similar to this on my last trip to Europe and it worked out great. I'm sure I could have gotten a tripod somewhere in Europe if it was stolen or lost.

PBrooks
30-Sep-2007, 20:56
I flew a variety of airplane while on the trip from 747 to puddle jumper, it fit them all.
PBrooks

ljsegil
30-Sep-2007, 20:57
Thanks Frank,
"But just a suggestion: you have too much stuff."
Guilty as charged, Frank, and I know it. It's just part of my disease. I love gear and more gear and the opportunities to "play" with it all. Have trouble deciding how to limit what gear to take, so naturally want to take it all. Thus, my perceived need for large carrying capacity. If you know a cure, please pass it on before the spousal unit permanently removes me from photography heaven or my back screams its last.
So, how much can the Pelican case hold? I don't imagine it could take the PBP padded cases and much gear? What do you think? It certainly sounds like a possible good solution.
Best,
LJS

Frank Petronio
30-Sep-2007, 21:21
I really can't tell you what it will hold but their website has accurate measurements.

I figured it has the most capacity of any airline carry-on, so I just bought it and filled it up. When it overflowed, that was too much.

Nick_3536
1-Oct-2007, 04:57
Isn't worrying about the size of the pack only half the question? Depending on the airline the carry on weight limit might be an issue.

butterfly
1-Oct-2007, 06:29
Not often I can post a response to a message , but this weekend I bought a Think Tank 'airport addicted', because I am going to Iceland in February, and want to take my 4x5 and digital gear as carry-on.

Although expensive here in the uk (£257), but compared to the cost of the biggest Billingham bag (£200+), which I could not get all the gear in, it is not much more.

I am really impressed with the quality, and it has swallowed the following:

Ebony 45SU, 2 lenses, 2 boxes of quickload, holder, cloth, shades, meter etc.

and

Canon Digital SLR with 35, 50 and 70-200 lenses, spare battery, cards, tripod mounts, Lee filter system and filters.

and there is loads more room for a laptop and all the essential bits you need for checking in.

With all that stuff I wouldn't want it on my back for very long, but it will get me through airports without having to check the gear in the hold.

Lastly, the Think Tank does not look anything like a camera bag, which is a good thing I think.

Regards

Steve

keith english
1-Oct-2007, 08:28
You might want to look at the Naneu Pro Goombah. It is about $225 and will fit in Airline Oh compartments, if you don't overstuff it with film holders. It rolls like a carry on bag( I roll it on trails with little trouble-it keeps the weight off you shoulder) and has backpack straps for when the trail gets rougher. And it doesn't scream "camera bag". It will carry my Zone VI 4x5, three lenses, meter etc, dark cloth, and about ten holders with ease.

Photobackpacker
2-Oct-2007, 14:26
Hi All:

By this Friday, October 5th, I will have a PDF table of the carry-on (hand baggage) for the World's larger airlines as well as a link to these regulations so you can check without having to search.

Unfortunately, this will not bring clarity to this issue. The regulations are a constantly-changing patchwork quilt! You will, however, get a feel for what is happening at the moment and arrive at a some general rules-of-thumb.

John Sexton gave me a heads-up to include the carry-on weight restrictions as Anne and he ran into a few issues on a recent trip. That turned out to be a very good suggestion.

Here are some rules of thumb:

- 22"/55cm length is by far the most common upper limit for length. (Yes, the Kelty 3100 is "compactable" to less than 22" since the support spine at the top of the pack is flexible.)

45"/115cm overall length+width+depth is becoming the most frequently seen overall limit. (Fully loaded, the Kelty 3100 will exceed this - plan on an abbreviated kit and use the compression straps to take out the excess girth)

Weight restrictions are not a problem within the Contenental US - 40 pounds (18kg) is very generous.

International weight limits are another matter: 26lbs/12kg for KLM, 23lbs/10kg for JAL, 18 lbs/8kg for Virgin Atlantic, 15.5 lbs/7kg for Quantas. Many airlines do not list their weight limit and will require a phone call. :(

In short, when travelling internationally, weight is probably the more difficult limitation to overcome. I carry-on only my camera, essential lenses and light meter. Film is shipped via UPS or FedEx. Everything else is put in my checked luggage.

The most important precaution is to check with each airline you will be flying shortly before your flight. These regulations are more changeable that the weather.

Bruce

http://www.photobackpacker.com

Photobackpacker
4-Oct-2007, 07:42
A table of Carry-on baggage regulations for the major world airlines is now available in the left hand navigation panel on the main page at www.photobackpacker.com. This document provides quick links to the baggage regulations for each of the listed carriers which I hope will prove useful in planning your travels.

Cheers!

Bruce

www.photobackpacker.com

JPlomley
4-Oct-2007, 13:56
Thought I would take the opportunity to chime in here. My wife and I just picked up a pair of packs from Bruce, her's the Kelty Redwing 3100 and mine the GG Nimbus 3800. Seven lens cases and a custom enclosure for the Arca Swiss F-Field camera. Absolutely brilliant system that has make hiking with heavy gear enjoyable. The nice thing about Bruce's system is we can remove the lens cases from the backerboards and put them in our Lowe ProRollers which meet all airline requirements for Air Canada and the majority of US carriers. We plan on checking the backpacks (stowed in our luggage along with the tripod), and when we arrive at our destination we will tranfer the lens cases back to our packs. Keeps everything nicely organized and well protected-a terrific modular system.

René
9-Oct-2007, 12:54
I searched long and hard for a backpack, that would go through as carry-on luggage and finally decided for the Tamrac Cyberpack 9. it provides a compartment for a notebook computer and has plenty of space. My Crown graphic fits easily, though the curved form factor of the Cyberpack is not exactly optimal for rectangular equipment... But the small 4 x 4 inches lens boards with lenses attached fit into the case. The front panel sports several divisions and smaller compartments, which take all the necessary paraphernelia (lightmeter, tools - if allowed at all on board, filters, travel lecture etc.)

The only problem is, that fully packed it is hard to force it through the doors of the overhead lockers, as it becomes very thick. In smaller aircraft I have to empty some bulky things from the front panel, to somehow get it through those doors.

regards
René

thedeep
9-Oct-2007, 16:42
Isn't worrying about the size of the pack only half the question? Depending on the airline the carry on weight limit might be an issue.

true, but usually the weight isn't an issue unless you are seen struggling with it. The pelican 1510 weighs a fair bit on its own, and this was an issue for me once in my many travels (in auckland they have an airport rule that doesn't allow for carryons to be more than 7kg---the case is 6+ kg empty!). I was pulled out of line by a by-the-book type, I'm sure had I gone an hour on either side I wouldn't have been noticed.

otherwise, traveling with gear and personal effects has just become cumbersome lately. 25 kg limits on checkins, tsa and the like rifling through your stuff, lack of accountability written into the fine print.

Keith Pitman
9-Oct-2007, 18:16
One thing to keep in mind is that if you travel on commuter airlines, the overhead storage compartments can be very small, especially in terms of height. So while you might get your pack on a larger aircraft, you may be required to gate-check it when boarding a commuter. It might be a good idea to have a mechanism to download the valuable gear --camera, lenses, meter, etc.-- into something else (a collapsible duffle bag, perhaps) if you have to gate-check the pack.

Songyun
9-Oct-2007, 18:24
If you travel on a small airplane, like CRJ or ERJ, even if your luggage is standard carry on size, you might find out that it wouldn't fit, and it will be asked to check in. The best solution might be a carry on size wheeled air case. that will provide max protection in either case. Pelican 1510 is ok, but either the foam set or divides set wouldn't fit many gears in, especially large format.

Andrew O'Neill
9-Oct-2007, 22:03
I "got it on" the airlines once back in '95, on a flight from Japan to Vancouver...:D

Ed Richards
10-Oct-2007, 06:51
Since most of the flights from my airport are the small commuters, I can echo what Songyun says - physics will enforce the size limits even if the ticket agent does not. One other issue is unplanned plane changes. If weather or other events intervene, you can get bumped to smaller planes than you anticipated, and it can happen away from home where there is no good recourse. If you really want to keep the gear with you when you can, one alternative is to use a big pelican or the like for your suitcase, and keep an empty duffle in it as well. In a pinch, you could put your clothes in the duffle and put your pack in the case and check it.

Pat Kearns
10-Oct-2007, 12:05
You will have to gate check your bag on the smaller commuter jets. So make sure your gear is well padded. Amen on the tripod head being viewed as a weapon. I was delayed in security at SFO and missed my flight out. They thought the handles were num-chucks (SP?). Before I left I mailed my film, camera, & lenses back home. That might be an option on your return. Just make sure your insure against loss or damage.

Songyun
10-Oct-2007, 12:47
For exposed film, I put them in ilford film box, and then put them in my pocket, It wouldn't trig the metal detector.

John Quinn
11-Oct-2007, 00:19
I have a similar MT outfit. About 12 months ago after a fair bit of research I bought a Photobackpacker Kelty 3100 pack,with the camera case and lens cases.
For many reasons it has turned out to be an excellent choice, so much so that a couple of weeks ago I got a Kelty 2650 - modified -from PBB for another camera outfit.
You will find that you will be able to fit in the camera and all that glass in the Kelty 3100- but, it will be far too big and heavy to be allowable as "carry on" luggage.
I think the weight limit is 7 Kg. - two months ago I flew from Australia to the UK with Malaysia Airlines and their limit was 5 Kg, and I noticed in Heathrow on the way home that there was a limitation ( Heathrow security I persume) of 1 item per person as as "carry on' luggage.
So, you Photobackpacker Kelty 3100 with the items you have will weigh around 15Kg - well over the limit, it will be heavy to carry, but the suspension in the Kelty if absolutely first class, and with Photobackpaer cases it will be considerable lighter and more confortable to carry than if you were using - say - a Lowepro Super Trekker.
A few weeks ago I got a Kelty 2650 from Photobackpacker, intending to use it with a 612 camera, however I got it on a domestic flight last week with my MT, three lenses and the usual odds and ends inside, the 2650 is within size limitations - however it would have been well over the weight limit if I had been challenged. I had a problem with Qantas a couple of years ago, my hand luggage was over limit - due to too much photo gear - I opened the bag, slung a camera over my shoulder, put two lenses into my coat pockets - and asked them to try again. OK this time. Shows what BS it all is.

Getting a bit OT, but I dont find it to be very practical to carry around !6+ Kg of photo gear and other odds and ends like drinking water Gortex etc. I always carry the camera, viewfinder etc, and 3 lenses (75mm,120mm and 210mm) - and the other lenses are all in PB cases and only go into my Kelty if I think I will need them that day, similarly with my roll film holder.
John

roteague
11-Oct-2007, 12:28
I had a problem with Qantas a couple of years ago, my hand luggage was over limit - due to too much photo gear - I opened the bag, slung a camera over my shoulder, put two lenses into my coat pockets - and asked them to try again. OK this time. Shows what BS it all is.

The primary reason I have quit flying on Qantas (at least for the time being). Qantas and a few other airlines have got so nitpicking on everything. My last trip to Australia, I flew on Air Pacific, but would prefer Hawaiian, which has more reasonable luggage restrictions. However, on this trip, I locked the 4x5 into checked luggage and took my chances (no problems). I carried on 35mm around my neck, film in pants pockets, etc. I think I will have to start leaving the laptop at home though.

Personally, I would have no problem with any of the airlines restrictions if they at least allowed you to puchase "excess" carry on (like they do with checked baggage) - then it would just be a matter of it being a business expense.

gr82bart
17-Oct-2007, 08:30
Personally, I would have no problem with any of the airlines restrictions if they at least allowed you to puchase "excess" carry on (like they do with checked baggage) - then it would just be a matter of it being a business expense.Robert,

It's funny you mentioned this. I once suggested this to an airline ticket agent - her response "We can't do that because then everyone will do it" :eek:

Regards, Art.

roteague
17-Oct-2007, 14:01
Robert,

It's funny you mentioned this. I once suggested this to an airline ticket agent - her response "We can't do that because then everyone will do it" :eek:

Regards, Art.

The airlines refuse to take any financial responsibility for checked luggage, refuse to provide any method of making sure checked luggage is secure, or refuse to guarantee that checked luggage will arrive on time. A professional traveling on business can't afford that. So, I'm not surprised. Most people don't trust the airlines with their checked luggage, and would try to carry as much as possible on the airplane with them.

tenderobject
27-May-2013, 01:10
Hi guys,

I know this is an old thread. I was searching for some answers although there are some here i still have a few questions.. Anyone tried F64 BPX for travelling? Is it airlines friendly? I checked the airlines that we often use and their max dimension for carry-on is like 22 x 15 x 8 inches. The F64 BPX is approximately 23" x 14" x 6". I'm just anxious if i should get a backpack or just use the case that i got with the camera. Another thing is the weight. Anyone knows the weight of F64 BPX? I will be carrying 8x10 KMV with lens and accesories. So, it would exceed my 7KGS max but last time, the airlines was very generous with my carry-on baggage. I travel from Manila to Iran with 2 carry-on's. 1 Northface backpack and a Domke. Almost 12kg and didn't had any problem. The guy just asked me if it was a camera equipment. That's it. I didn't get any problem even with my connecting flight from Dubai to Tehran. Hopefully F64 won't be a problem if i ended up getting it for my 8x10 setup. Thanks guys!

Drew Bedo
27-May-2013, 06:27
Alot of great recommendations about backpacks here . . .all good stuff.

Alternative: The pack itself can't go as carry-on it seems (unless I misses a suggestion ). I suggest that you check the pack empty of gear. Maybe pack clothing in it, Maybe the empty pack goes into another duffle along with your clothes. Photo gear that is not expensive, sensitive or desirable to a thief may also go into checked baggage.


Pack all the things you MUST have in your possession at all times into their PhotoBackpackerboxes and pack THEM into an airline approved carry-on for the overhead bin and/or under the seat. The boxes are all squarish and can even be made to stick together. If there is enough lead-time, the folks at PhotoBackpacker can make a mounting board for the boxes that will fit your carry-on bags.

Side benafits of this approach are that the standard looking carry-on bags don’t scream STEAL ME and they have wheels. When airline regulations and security are no longer constraining, you can swap the gear into the backpack and the clothing into the suitcases.

There’s gotta be some variation of this scheme that will work for you.

Cheers

Photobackpacker
28-May-2013, 10:03
For what it is worth, the Photobackpacker P3 backpack will arrive at the beginning of August. While it is the same size as the P1 and P2, the Granite Gear Air Current suspension is shorter than the Kelty suspension. This allows a pack that will actually fit into the 22 x 14 x 9 carry-on checkers. This was on of my redesign objectives. I sent out 6 of these packs to a select group of Beta testers and based on their input, this pack will be very popular.

Remember, when flying internationally, the weight restriction is often more of a challenge than the size. Most US domestic flights allow 40 pounds. International carriers allow a small fraction of that. Moral of the story, check with the airline you intend to fly.

Bruce

bracan
6-Jun-2013, 04:53
Few words...ThinkTank Airport International V2.

Arne Croell
6-Jun-2013, 09:20
Pack all the things you MUST have in your possession at all times into their PhotoBackpackerboxes and pack THEM into an airline approved carry-on for the overhead bin and/or under the seat. The boxes are all squarish and can even be made to stick together. If there is enough lead-time, the folks at PhotoBackpacker can make a mounting board for the boxes that will fit your carry-on bags.

Side benafits of this approach are that the standard looking carry-on bags don’t scream STEAL ME and they have wheels. When airline regulations and security are no longer constraining, you can swap the gear into the backpack and the clothing into the suitcases.
Cheers

Exactly what I am doing. When I carried my gear in backpacks years ago - backpacks that actually did fit the size bins - most of the time I got hassled at the check in counter. Air France was especially bad. Since I started putting all the contents in a nice Rimowa Salsa carry-on roller case (polycarbonate, semi-hardside and light weight), no more discussions, I just roll up to the counter with it. The empty backpack goes into the checked bag together with the tripod. This approach also increases your chance of not getting your carry-on weighed - as Bruce mentioned, outside the US the official weight limits for carry-on are much lower, typically 13-17lbs. The backpack, whether on the back or carried in the hand, usually gives away if its pretty loaded.

Andrew O'Neill
6-Jun-2013, 13:41
I've always wanted to get it on the airlines... don't we all? ;)

SergeiR
6-Jun-2013, 19:52
For what it is worth, the Photobackpacker P3 backpack will arrive at the beginning of August. While it is the same size as the P1 and P2, the Granite Gear Air Current suspension is shorter than the Kelty suspension. This allows a pack that will actually fit into the 22 x 14 x 9 carry-on checkers. This was on of my redesign objectives. I sent out 6 of these packs to a select group of Beta testers and based on their input, this pack will be very popular.

Remember, when flying internationally, the weight restriction is often more of a challenge than the size. Most US domestic flights allow 40 pounds. International carriers allow a small fraction of that. Moral of the story, check with the airline you intend to fly.

Bruce

Would be very interesting to check as i am flying quite often.
However one thing to add.

While airlines do check for weight one can always point to fine print on the ticket and there is typically bit where video- and photo- camera equipment as well as laptops (one of) do not count against uppermentioned weight limit for carry-on. :P i had to use it few times.

RHITMrB
9-Jun-2013, 13:07
My solution is to not try to carry every single piece of equipment in the same bag. All airlines let you carry on a piece of luggage plus a personal bag (such as a camera bag). I fit my Chamonix and 3-5 lenses in a normal size camera shoulder bag (my Domke J-1 or Think Tank Retrospective 10) and all the film and holders go in my backpack. I also have a tripod that fits in my backpack. I traveled to Iceland this way last year and would recommend this strategy!

Otto Seaman
9-Jun-2013, 15:09
22x14x9" 45" total dimension. That is the maximum carry on limit for most airlines.

Even that will be gate checked by many commuter airplanes. Usually gate checking is fine but you definitely want some padding and structural integrity to the pack/case if you do.

I have always been able to retain possession of my Think Tank Airport Antidote, albeit it is the smallest of their backpacks and it will not "carry" as nicely as a name-brand backpacking pack. It will hold a 4x5 Technika, ten holders, 3-4 lenses and foo-dads. However you can also get away with a laptop messenger bag for electronics and a moderate digital (small SLR or m4/3s). That's what I would do for reasonable travel.

However if you really must bring it all, pack it in a Pelican or Lightware or Tenba ATA-proof case with lots of padding. Keep an inventory list and have things labeled and organized. Use TSA-locks. Carry insurance. Maybe use the backpack to carry film and lenses only. Or ship everything ahead to your destination. In any event, it really adds up quickly and you might be a lot better off to adjust your gear-headedness?

Shootar401
10-Jun-2013, 19:35
From my experiences traveling with an airline with anything LF without a pelican case, is just asking for it to be broken. Unless you have a Crown or Speed Graphic that can take a beating. I would just get a smaller bag for traveling and mate it with a slightly larger Pelican case.