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Tangodancer
25-Sep-2017, 00:19
I am looking at getting a Gitzo tripod, I cannot afford a new one so looking at secondhand.
But finding difficult to work out which model of Aluminium Gitzo to get, it needs to support a 7x5.
Any suggestions please for which Gitzo model to look for.

jose angel
25-Sep-2017, 00:40
Older models are easy to know.

They use to be called "G-1xxx" (four digit), first variable (second digit) is about the series (that is, thicker tube thickness), third and fourth digit are about more specific variations (number of leg sections, height, column, etc.).
In even older versions (but still perfectly usable, although they lack some, I`d say, non essential features), the name use to be "G-xxx" (three digit), being the first the Series number (again, main tube thickness) and the second and third digit the specific model.

You basically have to look for the series you want; e. g., for a "true" lightweight 5x7", you may want a series 3 tripod (a series 2 -e.g. G1220-, may be still usable, but somewhat underweighted to my taste). So if you find a say, G1345, you will find that is a Series 3, four legged, tall, removable plate (no central arm) model (great for your camera). So for a "normal" or "heavy" 5x7" I`d definitely get at least a Series 3 model.

Think that the Series number is related to the thicker (top) leg tube thickness. So a four section tripod will have a thinner lower section that a three section one. It could be (or not) of an issue, like the use or not of a center column (which could be matter of taste). Also, if you are tall, you may want a taller tripod; if you`re short, on the contrary.

A Series 1 is definitely underweighted, and a Series 4 or 5 could be considered "overweighted" as a portable tripod (well, IMHO no tripod is such thing as "overweighted", the heavier the tripod the better for steadiness).

Recent versions have an hieroglyphic nomenclature that I`m not capable of deciphering... :O

Vaughn
25-Sep-2017, 01:42
The older ones also went by model names. The Studex, or 300 series, would be fine for 5x7. Even the Reporter, 200 series, the next size down, would be sufficient for field 5x7s.

If the word "Performance" is after the model name, that indicates the legs can spread farther out than non-performance models.

Tangodancer
25-Sep-2017, 03:23
The older ones also went by model names. The Studex, or 300 series, would be fine for 5x7. Even the Reporter, 200 series, the next size down, would be sufficient for field 5x7s.

If the word "Performance" is after the model name, that indicates the legs can spread farther out than non-performance models.

Tangodancer
25-Sep-2017, 03:23
Thanks for all the replies that helps me a great deal.

Mark Sampson
25-Sep-2017, 08:36
In the old Gitzo language, "cremaillaire" meant a crank-up center column.

Vaughn
25-Sep-2017, 10:21
In the old Gitzo language, "cremaillaire" meant a crank-up center column.

Thanks! I thought that translated to "Let's add more weight!" ;)

xkaes
25-Sep-2017, 12:31
I use two Gitzo's -- a medium-weight Reporter Performance for my 4x5 with a 275 ballhead (I'm sure it could handle 5x7), and a very similar, small, light, Weekender for smaller formats.

Just as important as the tripod, you need to consider the head -- which does not need to be Gitzo.

Any reason you are only looking at Gitzos for tripods? Employee discount, or something?

Peter De Smidt
25-Sep-2017, 14:37
I have a bunch of Gitzos of various ages. I would lean towards a series 3 of fairly recent vintage. All of mine are very usable, including the one from about 1970, but what changes is how easy the locks are to turn. I'm a fairly big guy, and so I don't really have a problem with any of them, but a friend of mine is slighter, and he had a bit of a problem with the older locks. (Yes, I've cleaned and lubed all of the threads...) The easiest to use is my 1227 mk II, which is from the mid 1990s. A friend has a series three from the same vintage, and the locks are easy to use. At some point Gitzo changed from riveted legs to glued legs. I think this happened in the early 1990s. Some brochure hunting would help nail that down. I'd avoid the riveted ones as being likely to have harder to use locking collars.

Tangodancer
26-Sep-2017, 00:12
I use two Gitzo's -- a medium-weight Reporter Performance for my 4x5 with a 275 ballhead (I'm sure it could handle 5x7), and a very similar, small, light, Weekender for smaller formats.

Just as important as the tripod, you need to consider the head -- which does not need to be Gitzo.

Any reason you are only looking at Gitzos for tripods? Employee discount, or something?

Tangodancer
26-Sep-2017, 00:15
The reason I am getting a Gitzo is that I brought an Induro Carbon Fibre not many years ago and its
showing its age, I wish I had spent a bit more and got a Gitzo.

xkaes
26-Sep-2017, 07:22
The reason I am getting a Gitzo is that I brought an Induro Carbon Fibre not many years ago and its
showing its age, I wish I had spent a bit more and got a Gitzo.

I've used many tripods over the years, and I'm happy with my two Gitzos, but there are a lot of other great tripods out there. Visiting the B&H website can give you a good presentation of what's available new, as well as what features you might want to have in a used tripod.

nbagno
26-Sep-2017, 07:38
Iím happy with my Gitzo 3530LSV. Iíve had it for 11 years and itís been flawless. The other day I was looking at replacing some of the leg interior components and was shocked at the cost of replacement parts. I put the legs back together after cleaning and hope it lasts another 11 years as is.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

David Lobato
26-Sep-2017, 11:52
My Gitzo 320 Studex would be okay for a 5x7 camera.

Bruce M. Herman
27-Sep-2017, 15:21
Not sure whether you have made your purchase yet. I have an old Gitzo 410 that I would sell for a fraction of its original price. Contact me for details offline if you’re interested.

john borrelli
28-Sep-2017, 16:34
I have owned a few Gitzos. I presently own a carbon fiber Gitzo. After I bought my CF, I discovered a very useful accessory for the landscape photographer, namely 170326 Gitzo extra long spikes. Unfortunately, they cost more than some tripods I have purchased but they are worth every penny. You might be able to find a grey market version on Ebay for less. You also might be able to find a version for other types of Gitzo tripods, just keep in mind, the longer the better. :) All the best, john

Vaughn
28-Sep-2017, 21:11
What is the advantage of the extra length?

I need to sharpen the ones on my Ries.

Alan Gales
28-Sep-2017, 22:20
I need to sharpen the ones on my Ries.


Yeah, you need them sharp. Great for self defense here in the city! ;)

john borrelli
29-Sep-2017, 15:31
I have used tripods with short spikes and tripods with a rubber tip that screws to reveal a short spike. However these shorter spikes really just sat the tripod on the surface. These long spikes dig into the ground in a way that the tripod is then difficult to move. This is important the lighter the rig. I use the cf tripod and a light Arca Swiss p0 head and a light camera as well. Gitzo was also able to round off the tip and so spike is really something of a misnomer. All the best, john

Carsten Wolff
1-Oct-2017, 19:49
I've had two Gitzos briefly (a new #3 and an old #5) as I got them for a bargain at a local s/h shop. - Flipped them quickly on the bay for profit, as my Manfrotto 055 was doing the same/better job as the 3 series and the 5 was too big for me. Had the basic Manfrotto/Bogen for the last 20 years or so under my 5x7. No complaints. Just my 2c.

tgtaylor
1-Oct-2017, 21:53
I've been using a Gitzo G-1347 in conjunction with an Arc Swiss z1sp head for 10 years now with heavy MF (6x7 Pentax), 4x5 technical field (Toyo AX) and 8x10 technical field (Toyo MII) without a negative. At just under 5 lbs the tripod is relatively light, sturdy and well balanced, folds compactly and for my height (5'9/10") doesn't require a center column. If I extend the 4 legs to their fullest I will need something to stand on to see the ground glass. A three-way head is a good idea with the 8x10 but it only takes a few seconds to balance with the Arca head that I can't justify the extra cost, weight, or convenience of the ball head. For the 8x10 GII and 4x5 Robos, I use another tripod that has a 3-way head and center column.

Thomas

Robert Opheim
4-Oct-2017, 19:33
I use a #3 series studex for my 4x5 and a #4 series giant for my heavy 8x10. They have been work-horses. I have had the studex since the 1970's