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1erCru
7-Aug-2017, 21:01
The other day I developed a series of Tmax 100 images. One of the sheets came out of the tank with a pleasing wavy , fluid , viscous effect over the entire sheet. I'm not sure if the sheet was bad but the image exposed beautifully regardless.

Is there a way to emulate , reproduce this processing " error "

locutus
7-Aug-2017, 22:15
a picture of the negative would help :-)

1erCru
8-Aug-2017, 11:29
Ive attached a portion of the image. The other three negatives developed normally. I researched this a bit and it seems like it has something to do with improper fixing but since the other negatives were okay it's hard to say. If anyone has any info on creating this effect or any effect using experimental developing I'd appreciate the info.


168015168015

djdister
8-Aug-2017, 12:20
Not just a fixing problem - probably a laminar flow problem (turbulence) brought about in development by improper agitation technique and/or film contact with other objects during processing.

Jac@stafford.net
8-Aug-2017, 13:02
Is there a way to emulate , reproduce this processing " error "

With digital manipulation, almost certainly, but to you wish to do it with conventional wet processing? Mistakes are almost impossible to perfectly replicate.

stawastawa
8-Aug-2017, 15:22
looks like it may have been pressed up against something based on the 'shadows' in the middle of the images shown (horizontal band with rounded corners at left)

I wonder if it could be created by a quick development (pour dev over negative, which is wet pasted to a board/tray)
quick immersion in fix
then maybe repeat

such a procedure might work with silver gelatin paper too... hmmm

1erCru
8-Aug-2017, 15:29
Yeah by duplicate I meant replicate / repeat. It was pressed up against the holder as there are marks , what's strange is the image ( not shown ) developed with a wonderful , deep , ethereal effect. Really cool. Pressing the negative to a board might work, thanks for the suggestion.

I think the negative stuck partially to the holder and it altered the fixers flow over the sheet. Going to experiment. Don't like to post process much save for color / tone and cleanup.

Andrew O'Neill
8-Aug-2017, 18:51
You say you used a tank...what tank?

1erCru
8-Aug-2017, 20:04
SP 445. Been using it for around four months and this is the first fatality which ended up looking great!

LabRat
8-Aug-2017, 20:17
You can also get that effect from light/bright objects in the OOF areas when using soft focus lenses at their max softness range...

Also try to print inside light created SF highlights by using #1 or #1 1/2 grade B/W papers...

Steve K

kaif
12-Aug-2017, 05:23
If this was developed in a SP 445, could it be that the film was loaded emulsion-side facing the holder, rather than outward?

(It looks like the short black lines on the left might respond with the small lamella at the bottom of the holder, and the horizontal light line is roughly where the centre stiffener would run - assuming that your image shows one of the short sides of the film.)

If so, that might then be quite easy to replicate, at least roughly...

Rick A
12-Aug-2017, 06:25
looks like it may have been pressed up against something based on the 'shadows' in the middle of the images shown (horizontal band with rounded corners at left)

I wonder if it could be created by a quick development (pour dev over negative, which is wet pasted to a board/tray)
quick immersion in fix
then maybe repeat

such a procedure might work with silver gelatin paper too... hmmm

Once you fix, developer will no longer have any effect on the negative. However, pasting the negative on a tilted "board" and dribbling developer in a "hit and miss" pattern at first before developing normal may do this.

jnanian
12-Aug-2017, 06:33
did you agitate your film or "stand" / "semi stand" develop
i get effects like that when i get bromide drag from not agitating

Andrew O'Neill
12-Aug-2017, 11:11
The images you uploaded is the actual negative, or did you invert?

1erCru
12-Aug-2017, 18:26
That last the processed image in Photoshop ( no longer a negative )

I do two inversions every 30 seconds for 9 mins Tmax 100 @ 70 degrees