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View Full Version : Which lense for 150/200 ?



Lucapolveri
14-Jun-2017, 04:31
Hi all, i'm going to buy a lense for my large format "diy"

Which lense 4x5" do you like with 150/200 € budget ? (with shutter)

Johnny LaRue
14-Jun-2017, 05:59
I found a Sinaron 150 in a good shutter for about $170 USD.
I think a lot of 150mm lenses will fall into this price range.

Lucapolveri
14-Jun-2017, 06:25
ah ok thanks for answer
90mm lenses are more expensive, right?

Johnny LaRue
14-Jun-2017, 06:47
ah ok thanks for answer
90mm lenses are more expensive, right?

They seem to be; I bought a 90mm Nikon, based on what I read here and elsewhere, and it was about twice the price of my 150mm.

jim10219
14-Jun-2017, 08:03
It all depends on what you want to do! Are you planning on using film or paper? Because if you're going with film, you'll definitely need a shutter in the lens, which will increase the cost. But if you're going paper, the speeds may be slow enough (depending on light) to get away with just using a lens cap as a shutter. Also, are you looking for a wide angle, normal, or a longer focal length (what they would call telephoto in the DSLR world) lens?

You can probably find a 90mm in your budget if you look for something like an Optar or Schneider Angulon. They're going to be older and smaller lenses with limited coverage, which means you may not get much movements from them. They're also probably not as sharp as the newer 90mm lenses, though they're also no where near the same size. But a more modern Nikon, Fujinon, or Schneider 90/8 lens will likely be over your budget if it's in decent condition.

You could probably find a bunch of 135-180mm lenses in this price range. Those can vary quite a bit in quality and price, as some will be older designs and some will be newer ones, but they'd all be in the "normal" lens category. They make good all around lenses for general use. I have an old Zeiss Tessar 135mm f:4.5 in a Compur shutter that works pretty well, but is uncoated. I got it for free with a camera body, but I bet you could buy 2 within your budget. They're pretty cheap, even if they're in great shape, but make sure you get one in good shape. They're old, so a lot of them are broken or non repairable. Then I have a Fujinon 150mm f:5.6 in a new Copal shutter. It's a superior lens and will push the limits of your budget, but is a fully modern lens with multi coating and a very sharp, modern look. As a bonus, you can remove one of the elements on that lens to get a longer focal length lens, though the aperture effectively doubles and you love some of the edge sharpness when you do that.

So you have lots of options. What you need to do first if figure out what kind of pictures you want to take, then the right lens will be easy to figure out!

Lucapolveri
14-Jun-2017, 10:15
It all depends on what you want to do! Are you planning on using film or paper? Because if you're going with film, you'll definitely need a shutter in the lens, which will increase the cost. But if you're going paper, the speeds may be slow enough (depending on light) to get away with just using a lens cap as a shutter. Also, are you looking for a wide angle, normal, or a longer focal length (what they would call telephoto in the DSLR world) lens?

You can probably find a 90mm in your budget if you look for something like an Optar or Schneider Angulon. They're going to be older and smaller lenses with limited coverage, which means you may not get much movements from them. They're also probably not as sharp as the newer 90mm lenses, though they're also no where near the same size. But a more modern Nikon, Fujinon, or Schneider 90/8 lens will likely be over your budget if it's in decent condition.

You could probably find a bunch of 135-180mm lenses in this price range. Those can vary quite a bit in quality and price, as some will be older designs and some will be newer ones, but they'd all be in the "normal" lens category. They make good all around lenses for general use. I have an old Zeiss Tessar 135mm f:4.5 in a Compur shutter that works pretty well, but is uncoated. I got it for free with a camera body, but I bet you could buy 2 within your budget. They're pretty cheap, even if they're in great shape, but make sure you get one in good shape. They're old, so a lot of them are broken or non repairable. Then I have a Fujinon 150mm f:5.6 in a new Copal shutter. It's a superior lens and will push the limits of your budget, but is a fully modern lens with multi coating and a very sharp, modern look. As a bonus, you can remove one of the elements on that lens to get a longer focal length lens, though the aperture effectively doubles and you love some of the edge sharpness when you do that.

So you have lots of options. What you need to do first if figure out what kind of pictures you want to take, then the right lens will be easy to figure out!

I'm going to use paper.. but also polaroid (i'm note sure, i'm informing about back, film and other). I know that 150mm is the "normal" focal length, but i'd prefer a wide focal (90 mm).. Unfortunately i've low budget :( so, i'll buy a 150mm

David Karp
14-Jun-2017, 13:44
You might find a single coated 90mm f/8 Fujinon for your budget. I had one and it was a nice lens. The only reason I sold it was because I got a great deal on a 90mm f/8 Nikkor, which gave me a larger image circle to work with. If not for that, I would still be using the Fujinon.

David Karp
14-Jun-2017, 13:48
You might find a single coated 90mm f/8 Fujinon for your budget. I had one and it was a nice lens. The only reason I sold it was because I got a great deal on a 90mm f/8 Nikkor, which gave me a larger image circle to work with. If not for that, I would still be using the Fujinon.

A good budget priced normal lens in your budget would include a 150mm Fujinon NW (marked as "W" on the outside of the front barrel) or a 150mm f/5.6 Caltar II-N. They are often available at lower prices than Rodenstock, Schneider, or Nikkor lenses at the same focal length. The Caltar II-N was made by and is identical to Rodenstock APO-Sironar-N and Sironar-N. You might also find a reasonably priced Caltar S-II, which was made by Schneider and is equivalent to a Schneider Symmar S.

Sean Mac
14-Jun-2017, 16:05
135mm is a focal length that is worth thinking about.

Lots of people seem to think this is a good choice for a first lens.

I paid less than 200 euro for a 100mm F6.3 Wide Field Ektar and 240 for a 90mm F6.8 Grandagon.

Both from Ebay and in excellent condition.

A lot depends on how much import duty you must pay.

The Wide Field Ektar came from the US but avoided any charge.

I had to pay 25% duty on a Commercial Ektar which stung a little bit.

Best wishes whatever you choose....:)

Lucapolveri
16-Jun-2017, 04:30
Thanks all for answer :)