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v.kapoor
23-Mar-2017, 15:12
Hello all,

I just bought my first 4x5 - a Linhof Master Classic. Very excited to get started, but need a few more things.
Not trying to blow the bank here, but also don't want to get in the habit of reselling/buying stuff.

What are your recommendations for:

-Tripod+Head that will comfortably hold the Linhof, but that I can potentially carry around a bit?
-Loupe?
-Darkcloth?
-Meter (incident vs. spot)

Thank you!

Leigh
23-Mar-2017, 15:39
I use the excellent Sekonic L-558 light meter.
It does all metering modes, including a great 1 degree spot meter.

It does flash, and accurately calculates mixed flash/incident exposures.

It was only available for a couple of years before being replaced by the over-priced 758.

- Leigh

John Kasaian
23-Mar-2017, 16:15
Dark cloth? Sew or have one sewn for you.

Loupe? Everyone swears by the Toyo. Used ones aren't all that hard to find reasonably priced.
I have a Silvestri, which is probably overkill, but I like 6x. Most everyone else prefers a lower power.
FWIW you could even use a Linen Tester like Ron Wisner.

Bob Salomon
23-Mar-2017, 16:15
A proper focusing loupe is, for the vast majority of shooters, 4, 5 or 6x with a focusing eyepiece so you can set it to focus directly on the grain side of the ground glass and has an opaque skirt to block all extraneous light. These were made by several companies, including Rodenstock, Schneider, Wista, Peak, Nikon, etc.. if you wear glasses you want one with long eye relief and a rubber cup around the eyepiece so you don't scratch your glasses.

Since you bought the MT Classic there is also a Linhof accessory that will eliminate both the dark cloth and a loupe. That is the Linhof Focus Metering Bellows.
It attaches to the back in place of the Folding Focusing Hood that comes on your camera. It is a bag bellows that folds flat and has a built in eyepiece that has two loupes in it. A fixed 2x one and a screw in 2x one. When used together you have a 4x loupe that will let you concentrate on any area of the gg that is about the diameter of a US quarter. When you unscrew one and use it as a 2x loupe it lets you see the entire gg at 2x magnification. In addition, if you have a Gossen meter with the microscope adapter the adapter will fit into the rubber eyepiece and with the 2x only eyepiece you can then meter the entire gg, any portion of the gg or a spot on the gg about the size of a quarter.

Additionally, like your Folding Focusing Hood the Focus Metering Bellows is hinged directly to the back and, if desired, it can swing away from the camera to give you access to the gg or Fresnel for, for instance, cleaning, or marking spots on the gg.

In any case, you should be sure that you have the Fresnel screen installed. There is a small rectangular silver bar attached to the middle screw of the ground glass hold down bar. Simply swing these two bars aside, drop the Fresnel screen on top of the gg with the grooved side facing the ground glass and swing the bars back so they hold the Fresnel in place.

chassis
23-Mar-2017, 18:44
Here is what I use. Pretty satisfied with all of it.

Meter - Sekonic L758DR
Loupe - Peak 7x scale loupe
Darkcloth - large blue bath towel
Tripod - Bogen 3047 head; can't remember the leg set model

Drew Bedo
24-Mar-2017, 06:34
I have used a home made (hand sewen) dark cloth. It has weights sewen into the corners and a few bits of Velcro here and there. Still have it. Works well with my 8x10.

A few years ago I picked up a BTZS hood for my 4x5, It folds small and keeps the sun off my head and shoulders . . .and doesn't flap like a traditional dark cloth will.

Loups: I have used a magnifying "Opti-Vizor" (like some jewelers use) and that works. I have used a set of really strong prescription reading glasses, which also works. I now use a nice 5x loupe by Rodenstock.

A good meter is a must. My first meter was the "Sunny Sixteen" rule. Thisgave good results within the limits of that technique. Next was a Luna Pro which worked well for reflected light (averaging, no spot) readings only. For years now I have used a Minolta IV F which measures incident (ambient and flash) with a dome and reflectedlight with a 9 degree semi-spot attachment. I am comfortable with it, but would get something brand new If I could. Sounds like you can, so go for it.

Something you didn't mention:
Changing bag/tent. I have both and both work well. The bag packs small and I have changed 4x5 holders on my lap in the back seat of a car going over Trail Ridge Road. The tent gives plenty of room but is heavier and bulkier to pack. There is a place for both in my photographic life.

Don't get tangled in getting the optimal kit together. There is no" best" way. Your photography will evolve as you go on and so will the way you work and the tools you use. The important thing is to get out and shoot.

John Kasaian
24-Mar-2017, 06:37
A proper focusing loupe is, for the vast majority of shooters, 4, 5 or 6x with a focusing eyepiece so you can set it to focus directly on the grain side of the ground glass and has an opaque skirt to block all extraneous light. These were made by several companies, including Rodenstock, Schneider, Wista, Peak, Nikon, etc.. if you wear glasses you want one with long eye relief and a rubber cup around the eyepiece so you don't scratch your glasses.

Since you bought the MT Classic there is also a Linhof accessory that will eliminate both the dark cloth and a loupe. That is the Linhof Focus Metering Bellows.
It attaches to the back in place of the Folding Focusing Hood that comes on your camera. It is a bag bellows that folds flat and has a built in eyepiece that has two loupes in it. A fixed 2x one and a screw in 2x one. When used together you have a 4x loupe that will let you concentrate on any area of the gg that is about the diameter of a US quarter. When you unscrew one and use it as a 2x loupe it lets you see the entire gg at 2x magnification. In addition, if you have a Gossen meter with the microscope adapter the adapter will fit into the rubber eyepiece and with the 2x only eyepiece you can then meter the entire gg, any portion of the gg or a spot on the gg about the size of a quarter.

Additionally, like your Folding Focusing Hood the Focus Metering Bellows is hinged directly to the back and, if desired, it can swing away from the camera to give you access to the gg or Fresnel for, for instance, cleaning, or marking spots on the gg.

In any case, you should be sure that you have the Fresnel screen installed. There is a small rectangular silver bar attached to the middle screw of the ground glass hold down bar. Simply swing these two bars aside, drop the Fresnel screen on top of the gg with the grooved side facing the ground glass and swing the bars back so they hold the Fresnel in place.

That's pretty cool, Bob!

John Kasaian
24-Mar-2017, 06:38
Don't get tangled in getting the optimal kit together. Your photography will evolve as you go on and so will the way you work and the tools you use. The important thing is to get out and shoot.
^^^this^^^

Alan Gales
24-Mar-2017, 06:52
This is what I use.

Meter: Pentax digital spot

Loupe: Toyo 3.6X

Darkcloth: Blackjacket

Tripod: Ries J100 with J250 double tilt head

I really like my Pentax spot meter but if you are unsure what to use then get what Leigh uses. It does it all.

The Toyo loupes can only be found used. Another inexpensive alternative would be the Peak with an opaque skirt. An expensive loupe with a focussing eyepiece like Bob suggested are said to be the best. If you have any questions about Linhof then ask Bob. He is the expert!

I love my Ries tripods and heads but they are expensive and are not as light as carbon fiber which the backpacker crowd prefers.

If you want a really "dark" dark cloth then you can't beat the Blackjacket ones. They are a bit slower to use though with the arm sleeves. Another nice dark cloth is the BTZS. Of course if you are on a budget a black oversized T-shirt or sweatshirt or even a large dark towel will work. If it were me, I'd look into that Linhof accessory that Bob suggested.

xkaes
24-Mar-2017, 08:22
My advise? Avoid getting into the "NAME GAME" like so many do. As to loupes, there are many. I prefer 7X or 8X for higher magnification and more accurate focusing. Whatever you get, make sure it has an adjustable eyepeice (to focus for YOUR eye) and a neck strap so you will always have it ready.

For darkcloths, the best is/was the WOODHOOD, but they have not been made in thirty years.

For meters, here you will need to do some research. There are so many out there and it all depends on what type of metering you want to do. That might change over time. Whatever you do, get a used meter, ; you will save a TON of money. And don't pay attention to anyone's "This is the best". Garbage!!! I use a Minolta meter but it's no better than any other.

Tripod? Again it will pay to do research and find one that meets your needs. Watch out for weight and look at the tripod features. There are two types of heads: panhead and ballhead. Different strokes for different foks. I've used both and the ball head is smaller, ligher and more flexible. But no matter which you prefer, there are MANY to choose from and there is no BEST model. But in any casae don't get a tripod or head that are bigger than what your camera needs.

John Kasaian
24-Mar-2017, 12:19
If you buy a used meter, you may want to have it calibrated by a competent shop.
FWIW I send mine to Quality Light Metric on Hollywood Blvd., in, well, Hollywood.

Bob Salomon
24-Mar-2017, 12:53
My advise? Avoid getting into the "NAME GAME" like so many do. As to loupes, there are many. I prefer 7X or 8X for higher magnification and more accurate focusing. Whatever you get, make sure it has an adjustable eyepeice (to focus for YOUR eye) and a neck strap so you will always have it ready.

For darkcloths, the best is/was the WOODHOOD, but they have not been made in thirty years.

For meters, here you will need to do some research. There are so many out there and it all depends on what type of metering you want to do. That might change over time. Whatever you do, get a used meter, ; you will save a TON of money. And don't pay attention to anyone's "This is the best". Garbage!!! I use a Minolta meter but it's no better than any other.

Tripod? Again it will pay to do research and find one that meets your needs. Watch out for weight and look at the tripod features. There are two types of heads: panhead and ballhead. Different strokes for different foks. I've used both and the ball head is smaller, ligher and more flexible. But no matter which you prefer, there are MANY to choose from and there is no BEST model. But in any casae don't get a tripod or head that are bigger than what your camera needs.

You left out one of the best choices for a tripod head. A 3-way leveling head like John Sexton uses.

Tobias Key
24-Mar-2017, 13:18
Your choice of loupe depends on what you want to photograph. I have a Nikon 7x loupe and a Schneider 4x loupe, I shoot portraits and I find that the 4x loupe isn't accurate enough for my needs because I am shooting at much closer focusing distances than a landscape photographer. What you intend to shoot makes a difference and people often offer advice without asking that question. I have a Boss screen on my camera which may have affected my choice.

In the past I have used a Gossen Variosix F, a Minolta Spotmeter F, a Minolta Autometer IVF and currently have a Polaris dual 5. Any of those meters are perfectly fine. The only reason I bought the Polaris meter is that I ran over my IVF with my car when it fell out of my camera bag after a long days' shooting! I also have a Gossen Lunasix 3 Which I keep in my large format bag as a backup as I use my Polaris with my DSLR as well, this is also perfectly accurate.

Bob Salomon
24-Mar-2017, 15:22
Your choice of loupe depends on what you want to photograph. I have a Nikon 7x loupe and a Schneider 4x loupe, I shoot portraits and I find that the 4x loupe isn't accurate enough for my needs because I am shooting at much closer focusing distances than a landscape photographer. What you intend to shoot makes a difference and people often offer advice without asking that question. I have a Boss screen on my camera which may have affected my choice.

In the past I have used a Gossen Variosix F, a Minolta Spotmeter F, a Minolta Autometer IVF and currently have a Polaris dual 5. Any of those meters are perfectly fine. The only reason I bought the Polaris meter is that I ran over my IVF with my car when it fell out of my camera bag after a long days' shooting! I also have a Gossen Lunasix 3 Which I keep in my large format bag as a backup as I use my Polaris with my DSLR as well, this is also perfectly accurate.

With the Boss Screen it is very important that your loupe has a focusing eyepiece since the image forming layer on the Boss is inbetween the two pieces of glass that the paraffin layer is on. That can really complicate things since if your Boss was not made specifically made for your brand camera it doesn't lie on the actual film plane of your camera.

Tobias Key
24-Mar-2017, 15:33
With the Boss Screen it is very important that your loupe has a focusing eyepiece since the image forming layer on the Boss is in between the two pieces of glass that the paraffin layer is on. That can really complicate things since if your Boss was not made specifically made for your brand camera it doesn't lie on the actual film plane of your camera.

I have a Toyo and the Boss Screen is actually labelled 'Boss Screen for Toyo', although I admit when I first got the camera I was very paranoid that it may still may not have been fitted right by the previous owner. I had to photograph a significant amount of angled newspapers and dummy heads to convince myself that everthing was fine!

Bob Salomon
24-Mar-2017, 16:45
I have a Toyo and the Boss Screen is actually labelled 'Boss Screen for Toyo', although I admit when I first got the camera I was very paranoid that it may still may not have been fitted right by the previous owner. I had to photograph a significant amount of angled newspapers and dummy heads to convince myself that everthing was fine!
When the backers of the Boss Screen were trying to market it originally they came to our offices with a sample of the original screen and the packaging for it. They came to us because we were owned by Gepe in Switzerland with a factory in the Netherlands and that was where Boss was and they knew our factory people.
The original screen that they brought to us was about 12 x 15" and the packaging was Fran with a diagonal groove on one piece that the screen could be placed into so it would stand up. The idea was to use a projector to project an image on to the screen and to photograph the scene from the other side. And, since the image was formed on a layer of wax it was grainless. Much cleaner image then a piece of frosted glass or a screen.

We really didn't have a market for that application but suggested that it could make a pretty good view camera screen, as long as they could get a wax formula that wouldn't reticulate from heat.

We were then selling the Linhof Super Screen that fit about 6 or 7 different brands of cameras with just one size.
So we sent them on to talk to Bogen and Ted Bromwell, Bromwell was the one that finally brought it to market.

That was back around 1981 or 82.

xkaes
24-Mar-2017, 17:47
If you buy a used meter, you may want to have it calibrated by a competent shop.
FWIW I send mine to Quality Light Metric on Hollywood Blvd., in, well, Hollywood.

Or you can just use the f16 rule for free.

John Kasaian
24-Mar-2017, 18:11
Or you can just use the f16 rule for free.

Then the OP needn't invest in a meter.

dodphotography
24-Mar-2017, 21:06
Meter: Sekonic 558 (for flash) and Pentax Digital Spot for everything else.

Loupe: my eyes, but that's because I shoot 8x10 so it's big enough and I have 20/20

Dark cloth: I have a black jacket that I like. Also, check the members made section. I had stone make me this really nice cloth made of Hi-Vis yellow as I often make pictures out in the woods and hunting accidents happen here, unfortunately.

Tripod: GITZO series 3 with an Arca Cube

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170325/dee67742fc942d0ca752328b647244d0.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170325/be82574f09b1fe717f09ff126644dc1d.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Luis-F-S
25-Mar-2017, 04:47
Pentax digital spot meter. I have two of the Zone VI modified ones. They're not cheap, but there's a reason as to why.

locutus
25-Mar-2017, 06:54
Small Heresy: i just use my Sony RX100 as a spotmeter, its smaller and lighter then a real spot meter.

Alan Gales
25-Mar-2017, 07:08
Small Heresy: i just use my Sony RX100 as a spotmeter, its smaller and lighter then a real spot meter.

No heresy. If it works, then it works! :)

Bill_1856
25-Mar-2017, 08:50
First tripod should always be a TILTALL -- get a used one made by Leitz ($100 on eBay).
I never use a loupe -- that's what the rangefinder is for.
Darkcloth? I use a BTZS, but any old towel will do.
My choice of meter is a WESTON Euromaster, (Sent to Quality in Hollywood for calibration), but also have a Pentax digital spot meter, which is off by a stop.

Thalmees
27-Mar-2017, 01:20
Sekonic 508 multi mode zoom master
It uses single AA battery.
More than 20 years in service, never failed me.
But, for any meter you will choose(even new), compare it with one under use and giving accurate readings.
Good luck.

Jim Andrada
27-Mar-2017, 10:25
Really don't need much of a head (for the camera, that is - the one on your shoulders is a requisite for good photography!)

The old trick of lining the lens up with one leg of the tripod and adjusting that leg for tilt works fine. Said while looking at the box of about 12 miscellaneous heads I've picked up over the (many) years. Not counting the three video heads:cool:

I've converted all my heads to Arca Swiss. A lot of heads use proprietary quick release plates, so I just get a few Arca clamps and mount them on the proprietary QR plate and it works just fine.

Bob Salomon
27-Mar-2017, 15:27
Really don't need much of a head (for the camera, that is - the one on your shoulders is a requisite for good photography!)

The old trick of lining the lens up with one leg of the tripod and adjusting that leg for tilt works fine. Said while looking at the box of about 12 miscellaneous heads I've picked up over the (many) years. Not counting the three video heads:cool:

I've converted all my heads to Arca Swiss. A lot of heads use proprietary quick release plates, so I just get a few Arca clamps and mount them on the proprietary QR plate and it works just fine.

Never, repeat, NEVER, shorten one leg in place of a head. You would end up not being the first person whose camera falls by doing this. Get a good head!

As for "converting to Arca" that is impossible. You can't make a Linhof or Novoflex or Gitzo or Benro head into an Arca head.
What you can do is add an Arca compatible quick release to most any head that does not have a quick release built in.

Jim Andrada
27-Mar-2017, 17:44
Well, my definition of converting is to add an arca clamp to whatever quick release plate fits the head in question. I even have one on the QR plate for my Manfrotto video head. Seems to work OK. Otherwise you need too many different QR plates.

Don't have to shorten the leg - just swing it further out a bit. Safer than shortening the leg. And no need to over do it. 10 or 15 degrees has been plenty for me.

Jim Jones
27-Mar-2017, 20:12
. . . Don't have to shorten the leg - just swing it further out a bit. Safer than shortening the leg. And no need to over do it. 10 or 15 degrees has been plenty for me.

Yes, indeed. Wise photographers have been doing that for almost 180 years. Unfortunately, my favored Tiltall like some other fairly new tripods doesn't permit that. Ah, progress!

Alan Gales
28-Mar-2017, 07:12
I like my Ries double tilt heads. When mounted to a Ries tripod they become one with the tripod and are really more of an adjustable platform than a head. Bob Seger would sing, "Like a Rock".

I haven't found a need for quick release plates. I can mount my 8x10 easy enough. I just tilt the Ries head so I can see what I'm doing, hold the folded Wehman camera by the strap, line up the hole and turn the screw. I then level the camera using a torpedo level. Easy, peasy. Even Drew could do it if he had a head! ;)



For those who don't get the joke, our friend Drew uses a Ries tripod without a tripod head.

Jim Andrada
28-Mar-2017, 08:43
I don't use the QR plates on everything. I have two of them on my Technika, a 30mm long one in the normal tripod socket and a 70mm long one on the drop down bed for when I use a longer or heavier (or longer and heavier) lenses - lets me balance the camera better. I don't use them on anything bigger than the Technika though. I do use them on the MF and 35mm and (perish the thought) my Canon 5D digicams. I even have one mounted on the support foot for the 150-600 zoom lens. And I have them on all the video cams. Even leave a little 20mm FLM QR plate on my all time favorite - a 6 x 4.5 Zeiss Super Ikonta that my father bought new in 1937. First film I developed and printed was a roll of 120 from that camera when I was around 4 or 5 years old and my father decided it was time to teach me darkroom work. About the same time he decided that I should learn to use a slide rule and do trigonometry and play Chess.

Jim Jones
28-Mar-2017, 10:12
. . . I was around 4 or 5 years old and my father decided it was time to teach me darkroom work. About the same time he decided that I should learn to use a slide rule and do trigonometry and play Chess.

Good for your father! If more parents were like that today, we might yet recover our old place as a leader in practical education. I had to do these things on my own when many years older.

Alan Gales
28-Mar-2017, 10:26
First film I developed and printed was a roll of 120 from that camera when I was around 4 or 5 years old and my father decided it was time to teach me darkroom work. About the same time he decided that I should learn to use a slide rule and do trigonometry and play Chess.

Jim, your Dad sounds like he wanted a buddy! :)

I didn't learn how to play Chess until I was 13. I took Trigonometry Sophomore year in High School. The teacher showed us how to use a slide rule. By then scientific calculators had replaced them though. I had an original TI30. We are talking 1978 to 79 school year.

Jim Andrada
28-Mar-2017, 12:44
I was talking 1944 - 45!!!

My father was an engineer and a really sharp guy - but no common sense about some things. I saw him using a slide rule one night and asked him what it was and next thing I knew I was"enrolled" in a days long after dinner course in slide rule tech. Asked him one night why when you put gas in the car (in the bad old days before they captured the fumes) things looked wavy and got a 3 day course in indices of refraction, vapor pressure, etc. He only had one mode of explaining things and didn't seem to be able to distinguish between answering questions for a curious 4 year-old and answering them for his engineering students when he taught at Columbia. Good in some ways!

John Kasaian
28-Mar-2017, 15:12
So what did the OP end up with?

Jim Andrada
28-Mar-2017, 17:00
Good question!!!

Alan Gales
29-Mar-2017, 08:25
So what did the OP end up with?

I think he bought a slide rule.

Jim Andrada
29-Mar-2017, 22:58
Just to follow up, a couple of photos of the way I set up the Technika and the Arca Swiss clamp on a Manfrotto ball head QR
plate.

163255 163256

JMO
30-Mar-2017, 05:20
To the OP, I think you've gotten a lot of good advice in this thread. However, as a Master Technika Classic user for the last 5 years, doing mostly landscape photography, I'll offer the following suggestions (if your budget can stand them?):

Tripod: Really Right Stuff makes (arguably) the best carbon fiber legs available, and I use their Versa 23 (TVC-23) model, with their BH-55 ballhead, and their largest screw-type B2-Pro/L model clamp (at 80mm wide). I have RRS plates on all my cameras, which are all Arca-Swiss standard dimensions I think. Some of my DSLR shooter friends who use longer lenses for birds and wildlife would not go smaller than the RRS 3-Series legs, but for your Linhof MT the RRS TVC-23 tripod is sufficient, and will be truly "your friend" when it comes time to take a hike. Just the TVC-23 legs are about $900 if I recall. There are many threads on this Forum discussing various tripod options, and considerations, and if you stick with this group here you'll find that some/many have strong opinions that only the most heavy and sturdy tripod you can find and stand to carry should be preferred.

Loupe: I have mostly used the Schneider 4x loupe that Bob Salomon mentioned, until recently when I purchased a Peak 8-16x loupe from a seller through the FS section of this Forum. I still use the 4x in the field for landscapes, but I've begun to explore interiors and table top still life subjects, and can now see the benefits of having a good 8x for fine focusing control. Follow Bob Salomon's advice about adjusting your loupe's focus so that you're focused sharply on the inside surface of your ground glass (and all the other advice he gives, especially concerning Linhof gear).

Darkcloth: No magic or high-budget option needed here, but I've used a Harrison dark cloth and not found any reason to look for a better option. I travel with one of Harrison's film changing tents, which was mentioned above, but don't use it any more at home since I now have a nice darkroom (way better for loading and unloading film holders).

Meter: Leigh suggested the Sekonic L-558, and that's the one I started with and still could use and like very much. But a LF friend suggested I consider a Gossen Ultra Spot 2, which I was able to pick up a really nice one for a reasonable price fairly quickly on eBay. Gossen no longer makes this spot meter, but I haven't touched the Sekonic L-558 for the last two years or so since I got the Gossen. And I don't really use all of the features the Gossen Ultra Spot offers on how to determine determine BOTH your exposure, and your development, for each film shot. I also have a Pentax digital spot meter, and it's really light and compact, so would be a good choice for someone who is concerned about space and weight in the backpack when hiking (as well as its good performance of course). when I go on a road trip I take the Sekonic and Pentax along as back-ups in case something would happen to the Gossen.

That's enough advice for now, except to suggest youtake your time in assembling your gear, and anticipate that part of your LF journey will be an evolution in your tastes and selection of the various needed gear. You'll appreciate most the wise/wiser early decisions you'll make about gear choices (thus your posts here), and try to avoid the regret of having to spend money twice (or more) on certain components of your LF kit until you're satisfied. ...

ben_hutcherson
30-Mar-2017, 14:56
I stay pretty simple with my set up, but then I'm starting with 4x5.

I have a Peak 4x with a black square skirt that cost me about $15 used. I use it both on the light table(it's full frame 35mm, and the skirt is 2x2 for a mounted transparency) and on the ground glass. The square skirt makes getting into the corners easier.

I just use a black jacket combined with the pop-out hood on my speed graphic for a dark cloth. What I use specifically depends on the temperatures-it's generally a jacket that I can wear also.

I've been using my faithful Leitz Tiltall tripod, although I find it a bit wobbly for 4x5. The nice thing about it is that at 6'2", I can comfortably look at the GG without raising the center column-you'll pay big money for a Gitzo or the like tall enough for that.

I switch between a couple of different meters. I have a Minolta incident that I prefer for when it's possible to actually get close enough to take an incident reading. I've yet to invest in a proper spot meter, but I've had good luck with either using an iPhone app or a 35mm SLR. I hover between using a partial and a spot screen when I'm using my Canon New F-1(I tend toward the partial screen because the only spot screen I have is optimized for long lenses and vignettes badly with anything less than 200mm). My old F-1, which I trust less for metering(CdS, vs Silicon in the new one) is always partial. Of course, if I have the Canon T90 out all it takes is a button push to switch between center weighted, partial, and spot.

Dan O'Farrell
30-Mar-2017, 15:10
A very sturdy and ridiculously inexpensive tripod, if you can find one, is a H.J.Riess, of Munich

v.kapoor
31-Mar-2017, 03:15
All this info is amazing. I'll keep you guys posted as I put together my collection!
Thank you.

Alan Gales
31-Mar-2017, 06:38
All this info is amazing. I'll keep you guys posted as I put together my collection!
Thank you.

That would be great. It's fun to hear what the new person ends up buying and why they picked what they did. :)

v.kapoor
2-Apr-2017, 14:51
Hey all,

Thinking about picking up up a (Leitz) Tiltall for $40.
Would this be sufficient for the Master Classic since it lacks long-bellow movements anyhow?

Bob Salomon
2-Apr-2017, 15:34
Hey all,

Thinking about picking up up a (Leitz) Tiltall for $40.
Would this be sufficient for the Master Classic since it lacks long-bellow movements anyhow?

Not really, it is basically designed for 35 through, maybe, 6x9.

What do you mean by lacks long bellows movements? You have basically the same movements until the bellows and bed are totally extended and even then, you still have some movements.

Drew Bedo
2-Apr-2017, 15:37
I used a TiltAll (Star) with a Speed Graphic at the Grand Canyon . . .it was OK for that.

For $40 it would be worth trying out.

Bob Salomon
2-Apr-2017, 15:41
I used a TiltAll (Star) with a Speed Graphic at the Grand Canyon . . .it was OK for that.

For $40 it would be worth trying out.

A speed is considerably lighter then a MT and has much less bellows and movements.

Salmo22
2-Apr-2017, 18:06
A proper focusing loupe is, for the vast majority of shooters, 4, 5 or 6x with a focusing eyepiece so you can set it to focus directly on the grain side of the ground glass and has an opaque skirt to block all extraneous light. These were made by several companies, including Rodenstock, Schneider, Wista, Peak, Nikon, etc.. if you wear glasses you want one with long eye relief and a rubber cup around the eyepiece so you don't scratch your glasses.

Since you bought the MT Classic there is also a Linhof accessory that will eliminate both the dark cloth and a loupe. That is the Linhof Focus Metering Bellows.
It attaches to the back in place of the Folding Focusing Hood that comes on your camera. It is a bag bellows that folds flat and has a built in eyepiece that has two loupes in it. A fixed 2x one and a screw in 2x one. When used together you have a 4x loupe that will let you concentrate on any area of the gg that is about the diameter of a US quarter. When you unscrew one and use it as a 2x loupe it lets you see the entire gg at 2x magnification. In addition, if you have a Gossen meter with the microscope adapter the adapter will fit into the rubber eyepiece and with the 2x only eyepiece you can then meter the entire gg, any portion of the gg or a spot on the gg about the size of a quarter.

Additionally, like your Folding Focusing Hood the Focus Metering Bellows is hinged directly to the back and, if desired, it can swing away from the camera to give you access to the gg or Fresnel for, for instance, cleaning, or marking spots on the gg.

In any case, you should be sure that you have the Fresnel screen installed. There is a small rectangular silver bar attached to the middle screw of the ground glass hold down bar. Simply swing these two bars aside, drop the Fresnel screen on top of the gg with the grooved side facing the ground glass and swing the bars back so they hold the Fresnel in place.

Bob:

In an effort to avoid the traditional dark cloth/loupe arrangement, I was considering acquiring a Right Angle Reflex Attachment 45 for my MT2000. Then I read your comments about the 45 Focus/Metering Bellows. Since my prior history with 4x5 (30+ years ago) did not include these options, I'd appreciate comments about the pros/cons for both these Linhof accessories.

Thanks;

Jeff

Bill_1856
2-Apr-2017, 18:44
Hey all,

Thinking about picking up up a (Leitz) Tiltall for $40.
Would this be sufficient for the Master Classic since it lacks long-bellow movements anyhow?

It would be perfect. (Pay no attention to Bob S. negative answer -- he's wrong.)

Bob Salomon
3-Apr-2017, 03:18
Bob:

In an effort to avoid the traditional dark cloth/loupe arrangement, I was considering acquiring a Right Angle Reflex Attachment 45 for my MT2000. Then I read your comments about the 45 Focus/Metering Bellows. Since my prior history with 4x5 (30+ years ago) did not include these options, I'd appreciate comments about the pros/cons for both these Linhof accessories.

Thanks;

Jeff
Since the Reflex Viewer is only 2x and lets you see the entire gg at once it really isn't the best for focusing. For that reason the right angle part detaches leaving the base as a Hood where you can stick a loupe into for focusing precisely.
The Metering Bellows has a 4 x loupe, convertible to 2x so it is designed for both critical focusing and viewing. In addition it is. Flexible cloth that folds flat unlike the right angle Viewer which is. Plastic and doesn't travel as easy.
And for 40.00 you should stay away from the Tiltall and if you go to the Tiltall site you can read about my extensivehistory of Tiltall. It is not designed for a Technika and besides its leg limitations the head is a massive problem. It is controlled by almost identical knobs, the column has no dampening and if you loosen the wrong knob inadvertent with a Technika on it you can really hurt something.

Jim Jones
3-Apr-2017, 06:26
A Tiltall, like any camera mounted on it, isn't foolproof. A rubber bushing on the column between the head and legs absorbs some of the shock of accidently loosening the column clamp.

Salmo22
3-Apr-2017, 07:42
Since the Reflex Viewer is only 2x and lets you see the entire gg at once it really isn't the best for focusing. For that reason the right angle part detaches leaving the base as a Hood where you can stick a loupe into for focusing precisely.
The Metering Bellows has a 4 x loupe, convertible to 2x so it is designed for both critical focusing and viewing. In addition it is. Flexible cloth that folds flat unlike the right angle Viewer which is. Plastic and doesn't travel as easy.

Bob:

Thank you for the explanation. My quest for a Metering Bellows begins.

Regards;

Jeff

Bob Salomon
3-Apr-2017, 08:00
A Tiltall, like any camera mounted on it, isn't foolproof. A rubber bushing on the column between the head and legs absorbs some of the shock of accidently loosening the column clamp.

There are several tripods currently made and formerly made that have either pnumatically dampened columns or spring dampened ones. But all really good tripods are designed with different shaped and/or length locking knobs to eliminate accidentally loosening the wrong one and, at the least, changing the scene and at worst busting your knuckles or breaking part of your camera.

Jim Jones
3-Apr-2017, 17:51
There are several tripods currently made and formerly made that have either pnumatically dampened columns or spring dampened ones. But all really good tripods are designed with different shaped and/or length locking knobs to eliminate accidentally loosening the wrong one and, at the least, changing the scene and at worst busting your knuckles or breaking part of your camera.

Duct tape can alter the shape of a knob for easy recognition, and can be removed if necessary. In the Tiltall case, different versions used different shaped knobs. One can always get a his and hers set of Tiltalls, and swap the offending knobs. Customizing a good tripod is more practical than buying a perfect one.

archphotofisher
4-Apr-2017, 09:12
Lanyard for Loupe (sports store for a duck call lanyard)
Dark Cloth 55"x 41" works with all formats for me, handmade mine, 2 layers corduroy fabric (without the ridges) black oneside, with the other side red. One layer works fine for darkness, i added the second layer for color.

Carry all Bag i use a shipwrights heavey canvas to haul my meters,film holders,extra lense, black card sun shades and other misc. stuff.

Bill_1856
4-Apr-2017, 14:39
[QUOTE=. Customizing a good tripod is more practical than buying a perfect one.[/QUOTE]

There's no such thing as a perfect tripod, just as there's no such thing as a perfect camera bag.

archphotofisher
4-Apr-2017, 17:09
another thing i like to use alot is a old fashion stop watch, mine has 30 second face, when i was doing late night interiors the ticking sound help from falling asleep on the 4 plus minute exposures.

Thalmees
9-Apr-2017, 00:53
Hey all,
Thinking about picking up up a (Leitz) Tiltall for $40.
Would this be sufficient for the Master Classic since it lacks long-bellow movements anyhow?
Hello again v.kapoor,
While the price is encouraging, I do not like tripods with short post above the spider!
Yes, your camera is a foldable field one, but still it's metal.
I avoid any tripod with post above spider, it elevate the center of weight of the camera/tripod system, which may decrease stability, though it has better versatility.
I think, a RRS Versa 3 tripod or equivalent(at least), should be enough for LF photography using field camera.
Any equivalent wood tripod(in size), should be better, but at the same time considerably heavier. Still better if you are going to tolerate the extra weight.
The primary purpose of a tripod, is not to carry them, so the lighter is the better. Tripod should be sturdy enough to support your camera and decrease(or prevent) vibrations. After that, it's weight can be considered as a second feature.
Good luck v.kapoor.

John Kasaian
9-Apr-2017, 07:49
Not all Tiltalls were created equal!
There is at least one smaller model Tiltall and at least three different manufacturers.
I've found them quite adequate for my Graphic View 2, 5x7 Speed Graphic and a very lightweight fixed focus Gowland 8x10 Aerial (honest!)
But when it comes to putting legs under a Linhof, I'd heed Mr Salomon's expertise. My 2-cents anyway.

Alan Gales
9-Apr-2017, 10:43
But when it comes to putting legs under a Linhof, I'd heed Mr Salomon's expertise. My 2-cents anyway.

His name may be Salomon but sometimes I think it should be Solomon. I don't argue with Bob. :)

gnuyork
12-Apr-2017, 18:25
Gear I use and it works:

Tripod - I have a few - Berlebach, vintage Tilt-all made by Leitz, vintage Majestic, and a vintage Otto. The Berlebach gets the most use. I'd love a Ries (but pricey).
Head - FLM 48 ball head with tiltlock feature (and pano stops)
Loupe - 7x rebranded (something) I think it's from Calumet?
Dark cloth - something my mom sewed for me - black on one side, white on the other.
Meter - Zone modified Pentax Digital Spot, and Sekonic L358 (flash and ambient)

All of this gear I either got used, was given to me, or I bought new for an exceptional deal including my camera and lenses (with the exception of the loupe, paid full boat for that.)

jim10219
14-Apr-2017, 13:03
For the meter, I recommend a DSLR. That acts as a meter, and as a polaroid back to give you an idea of what your final image should look like. It's really handy for a beginner, and useful. Another option, especially if you don't want to carry around a second camera, is an app for you phone called "Pocket Light Meter". It's free, and on the iPhones I've tried it with, it's surprisingly accurate. The downside is it's not a very tight spot meter. So it's not great for measuring a complex scene. But for most stuff, it works really well and is definitely worth the price. If you want to step up and get a spot meter, those Soligor digital spot meters are very accurate and a good bit cheaper than the Pentax. The only downside to them is they're quite a bit larger. I wouldn't recommend an incident meter. I have one and never use it. It's an old Sekonic L-28 C2. The selenium cell is dying, so it's always a stop low, but that's easy enough to remember and adjust for. I really on use it when I'm in the mood to try something different.

For the Loupe, just get a cheap thread count loupe. They fold up nice and small and fit in your pocket. They can be found in the magnification you desire (I've seen them from 3x-20x. Mine is 7x), and if you lose or destroy it, you can easily buy another for just a few bucks at just about any store that has sewing equipment like Hobby Lobby, Michael's, or Wal-Mart. I'm not convinced there is any reason to spend more on a loupe.

For the Dark Cloth, either make your own, or look for a used one. It's a dark cloth. There's really not much to it other than it being a cloth that blocks out light. Find one in the size and weight you like. I bought a camera that came with a Calumet brand one that I use. I have no complaints, but if I didn't get this one free with my first large format camera, I probably would have just sewn my own together. I don't see any reason to get spendy here. Just make sure it's dark on the inside and light on the outside. On summer days, they can get quite hot, and a light colored outer layer helps.

For the tripod, this is the area you don't want to skimp on. I use an old Bogen 3036 tripod with a Bogen 3047 head. I got it fairly cheap, and it's very sturdy and very, very heavy. It's great for keeping the tripod steady on long exposures in the wind. It's also great for astrophotography with my DSLR and barn door tracker. The down side is it's size and weight. You don't want to take it on a plane or on long hikes. I kind of regret not spending more on a nicer tripod just for the portability issues, but unfortunately I'm not rich, and I haven't found one that is light, folds up small, rigid, and affordable. So until I can justify spending the money required to get a really nice one that checks all of those boxes, I'm resigned to lugging around a beast of a tripod that weighs more than my camera and lenses combined.

v.kapoor
3-May-2017, 23:02
Hello all,

Slowly putting together my gear. I found a good deal on a Feisol CT-3441S with a CB-40D head.
Would this suffice for the Linhof MT Classic? Any opinions would be great, as I'm trying to hone in on the right tripod soon. Eager to shoot!

Here are some specs:
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/848825-REG/FEISOL_CT_3441S_Traveler_CT_3441S_Rapid_Tripod.html
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/848858-REG/FEISOL_CB_40D_CB_40D_Ballhead_With_QP_1444750.html

Thanks.

B.S.Kumar
4-May-2017, 02:18
You might also want to talk with Ari Tapiero on this forum. He distributes FLM tripods in North America.

Kumar

Alan Gales
4-May-2017, 12:26
You might also want to talk with Ari Tapiero on this forum. He distributes FLM tripods in North America.

Kumar


Ari recently came to St. Louis to demonstrate the FLM products to my favorite camera store. We along with our wives and my daughter had dinner together. Ari is a great guy and very knowledgable and easy to talk to. I was also impressed with the FLM tripods and heads he had with him. Here is his FLM website.

http://www.flmcanada.com/contact.html